Debt charity, Christians Against Poverty, reaches out to those in need of advice ahead of one of 'busiest days ever' in February

Watford Observer: Debt charity reaches out ahead of one of  'busiest days ever' Debt charity reaches out ahead of one of 'busiest days ever'

The second Monday in February is expected to bring about one of the busiest days ever for growing debt counselling charity Christians Against Poverty.

Already in 2014, staff have seen calls for debt help from across the UK soar by 69 per cent compared with the same period last year.

Watford Centre Manager Liz Potter said: "We’re keen to hear from people who are struggling to pay the bills or feed their families.

"We want to hear from people who have lost track of their debts and are suffering sleepless nights. Our service is ideally placed for them." One client, Lauren, who picked up the phone to ask for help, is now debt free. She said: "I’m dancing around the house, have applied to go back to college and am ecstatic."

The start of the year brings a flurry of calls from people who typically have problems which have spiralled over many months and years.

Six out of ten people are worried about losing their homes and a quarter are regularly missing meals, says the charity.

Liz added: "It’s not just a bit of overspending at Christmas. They tend to call in January and February because they can’t face doing so in the days leading up to the festivities and they prefer to sort things when the children are at school."

Statistics show that Monday is the most popular day of the week to call for debt help and mid-February sees an annual peak in calls.

Watford Observer: CAP

Liz, based at Soul Survivor Watford church, added: "People tell us that calling for help with something as personal as finances is the hardest thing to do.

"They are surprised and relieved to find that we don’t judge them. "

Debbie said: "It was so nice not to feel judged or condemned for some of the mistakes I have made."

For more: www.capuk.org or call 0800 328 0006.

Comments (1)

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12:26pm Fri 7 Feb 14

John Dowdle says...

I find the hypocrisy of these so-called Christians Against Poverty utterly unbelievable. We recently had the Archbishop of Canterbury declaring a War On Wonga, only to find that the Church of England itself was an investor in the company. Most of these large religious businesses have substantial investment portfolios; their investments are based upon manipulation and exploitation of poor people. They then have the sheer gall to offer debt advice - you could not make it up. The still-existing Pope was reported as owning 200 pairs of Italian hand-made shoes, each costing £500 per pair. That comes out at £10,000 being consumed by his shoes' wardrobe. He then has the audacity to lecture everyone else on the plight of the poor! Instead of wasting resources on religion, we should be investing in school financial education so that young people will avoid getting into debt in the first place. Also, Citizen's Advice Bureaux do this work week in and week out. Why are they not mentioned in the article?
I find the hypocrisy of these so-called Christians Against Poverty utterly unbelievable. We recently had the Archbishop of Canterbury declaring a War On Wonga, only to find that the Church of England itself was an investor in the company. Most of these large religious businesses have substantial investment portfolios; their investments are based upon manipulation and exploitation of poor people. They then have the sheer gall to offer debt advice - you could not make it up. The still-existing Pope was reported as owning 200 pairs of Italian hand-made shoes, each costing £500 per pair. That comes out at £10,000 being consumed by his shoes' wardrobe. He then has the audacity to lecture everyone else on the plight of the poor! Instead of wasting resources on religion, we should be investing in school financial education so that young people will avoid getting into debt in the first place. Also, Citizen's Advice Bureaux do this work week in and week out. Why are they not mentioned in the article? John Dowdle

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