Bid to track down owner of child's camera left in Bushey Museum shop

A photo taken on the camera.

A photo taken on the camera.

First published in News
Last updated

Staff are trying to track down the person who left a pink VTech child’s camera in the shop at Bushey Museum.

The camera was left several weeks ago but so far no one has claimed it.

The camera contains 300 pictures of a child, her dog and her father, with the first picture taken on Boxing Day 2012, suggesting it may well have been a Christmas present.

By publishing this info, and a couple of pictures, perhaps someone may recognise the owner.

If anyone recognises the pictures or if you lost the camera contact the shop manager Barry Hyman on 020 8420 4057.

Comments (2)

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4:29pm Fri 7 Mar 14

samjlear says...

This is becoming an amazing story! Although it has human interest for anyone I have an additional, personal reason to be touched by it. I was with John on a business trip in Miami when he received news that his beloved daughter's camera had been found. We were out on the streets of the south beach area on a shopping trip for him to buy presents for his children, that he'd been missing for the week we'd been away. We naively hadn't listened to the warnings we'd been given that we didn't want to be caught out in the storm that was coming that afternoon. Rashly we'd gone ahead with it, partly in testament to John's devotion to his four lovely children. Suddenly, inevitably, the storm hit. For us, used to temperate English weather this tropical storm was a deluge of almost biblical proportions and within half a minute we were soaked to the skin. We quickly realised we had a very different set of priorities now. We needed to get a cab back to our hotel and fast. The streets were flooded, traffic had slowed in the sheet rain to walking pace and we were miles away from our hotel. Almost immediately, all the few cabs that were passing were already taken. The possibility of us missing our flight home later that evening was very real. Things were starting to get desperate as we spent almost an hour trying to get a cab. Thankfully, somehow, Johns phone had not been ruined in the rain. He received a call and when he answered it, the face that only moments before had been racked with worry and desperation that he should secure safe passage back to his family now radiated first amazement, then happiness. He'd received word that the Observer had published a photo from a camera and it was of him.
I suspect that he had already accepted the loss of his daughters camera, and with it all the photos that she had lovingly taken of her family over the months. I can't say whether all the water still dripping down his cheeks were raindrops or were, in part, tears of happiness and gratitude but I know I have my suspicions. The rain stopped, as quickly as it had started, and the sun both literally and figuratively broke from the clouds. It was at that point, miraculously, we then passed some colleagues sitting under the awning of a restaurant who had been attending the same conference as us. They had managed to secure cabs and there was room in them for two bedraggled refugees. We were able to get back to our hotel in time to pick up our luggage and catch the flight. I'm now writing this from my living room and I know that John got home safe too, now dry and back in the bosom of his loving family. So thank you Watford Observer! For turning a story that started with the loss of a camera, filled with memories, each one testament to a daughters loving catalogueing of the precious people and things in her life, then lost in a moment of carefree childish inattention, to one where the intervention of digital media and social networks has provided a story of hope. This is positive proof that the modern, technological world, that we can sometimes worry is in intrusive element, that separates us from each other and our own humanity can work with us and can provide moments of humanity and redemption, of connection and cooperation, and that communities can still pull together. More please!
This is becoming an amazing story! Although it has human interest for anyone I have an additional, personal reason to be touched by it. I was with John on a business trip in Miami when he received news that his beloved daughter's camera had been found. We were out on the streets of the south beach area on a shopping trip for him to buy presents for his children, that he'd been missing for the week we'd been away. We naively hadn't listened to the warnings we'd been given that we didn't want to be caught out in the storm that was coming that afternoon. Rashly we'd gone ahead with it, partly in testament to John's devotion to his four lovely children. Suddenly, inevitably, the storm hit. For us, used to temperate English weather this tropical storm was a deluge of almost biblical proportions and within half a minute we were soaked to the skin. We quickly realised we had a very different set of priorities now. We needed to get a cab back to our hotel and fast. The streets were flooded, traffic had slowed in the sheet rain to walking pace and we were miles away from our hotel. Almost immediately, all the few cabs that were passing were already taken. The possibility of us missing our flight home later that evening was very real. Things were starting to get desperate as we spent almost an hour trying to get a cab. Thankfully, somehow, Johns phone had not been ruined in the rain. He received a call and when he answered it, the face that only moments before had been racked with worry and desperation that he should secure safe passage back to his family now radiated first amazement, then happiness. He'd received word that the Observer had published a photo from a camera and it was of him. I suspect that he had already accepted the loss of his daughters camera, and with it all the photos that she had lovingly taken of her family over the months. I can't say whether all the water still dripping down his cheeks were raindrops or were, in part, tears of happiness and gratitude but I know I have my suspicions. The rain stopped, as quickly as it had started, and the sun both literally and figuratively broke from the clouds. It was at that point, miraculously, we then passed some colleagues sitting under the awning of a restaurant who had been attending the same conference as us. They had managed to secure cabs and there was room in them for two bedraggled refugees. We were able to get back to our hotel in time to pick up our luggage and catch the flight. I'm now writing this from my living room and I know that John got home safe too, now dry and back in the bosom of his loving family. So thank you Watford Observer! For turning a story that started with the loss of a camera, filled with memories, each one testament to a daughters loving catalogueing of the precious people and things in her life, then lost in a moment of carefree childish inattention, to one where the intervention of digital media and social networks has provided a story of hope. This is positive proof that the modern, technological world, that we can sometimes worry is in intrusive element, that separates us from each other and our own humanity can work with us and can provide moments of humanity and redemption, of connection and cooperation, and that communities can still pull together. More please! samjlear
  • Score: 15

10:43pm Fri 7 Mar 14

Barry Hyman says...

What is as amazing is this. I handed the camera over to Lola this afternoon at the Museum, then went on to collect my daughter and toddler grandson. Telling her of my little 'triumph' she said 'I know about this.' 'You can't possibly,' I replied. 'Oh yes I can. Its' on a Bushey Mumsnet site.' Someone one had already picked the story up from the Observer website and passed it on!.
Instant communication is here to stay! Well done Observer.
Barry Hyman
Shop Manager
Bushey Museum
What is as amazing is this. I handed the camera over to Lola this afternoon at the Museum, then went on to collect my daughter and toddler grandson. Telling her of my little 'triumph' she said 'I know about this.' 'You can't possibly,' I replied. 'Oh yes I can. Its' on a Bushey Mumsnet site.' Someone one had already picked the story up from the Observer website and passed it on!. Instant communication is here to stay! Well done Observer. Barry Hyman Shop Manager Bushey Museum [where the customer comes first!] Barry Hyman
  • Score: 5

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