West Herts College win Cabtify logo competition

Students from West Herts College have won a competition to design a new logo for a Watford business.

Foundation degree Art and Design students submitted their best ideas and the winner, Tom Hall, was given Harlequin gift vouchers and the bonus of a signed Emeli Sande album.

Both Mr Hall and Josh Noyes, runner-up have been given the opportunity to work for the company, Cabtify, on a freelance basis.

Comments (9)

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5:01pm Thu 22 Nov 12

khilan says...

Its great to see local companies employ students when there is such a high unemployment rate for the younger generation.
Its great to see local companies employ students when there is such a high unemployment rate for the younger generation. khilan

5:15pm Thu 22 Nov 12

mocheema says...

Really glad to see a local business pioneering the way forward by getting involved with students from West Herts College which, i'm sure has had a massive input in their business by the students creating them a company logo and also given the student a taste of life to come post studies. Best of luck to Cabtify and congrats to the winner of the competition!
Really glad to see a local business pioneering the way forward by getting involved with students from West Herts College which, i'm sure has had a massive input in their business by the students creating them a company logo and also given the student a taste of life to come post studies. Best of luck to Cabtify and congrats to the winner of the competition! mocheema

6:12pm Thu 22 Nov 12

raylin69 says...

I agree, great idea to get local college students involved. More companies should take note from Cabtify!
I agree, great idea to get local college students involved. More companies should take note from Cabtify! raylin69

6:36pm Thu 22 Nov 12

Elizabeth71 says...

Statistics from the House of Commons website state that between the period May-July 2012, 1.02 million young people aged 16-24 were unemployed. If more companies followed suit like Cabtify then they can collectively bring this number down. I fear for the younger generation.
Statistics from the House of Commons website state that between the period May-July 2012, 1.02 million young people aged 16-24 were unemployed. If more companies followed suit like Cabtify then they can collectively bring this number down. I fear for the younger generation. Elizabeth71

6:38pm Thu 22 Nov 12

raylin69 says...

I never knew the number was that high.
I never knew the number was that high. raylin69

7:52pm Thu 22 Nov 12

Elizabeth71 says...

I suspect the situation is much worse than the stats suggest in the more affluent areas of the UK. Plenty of graduates have returned to the parental home in order to seek work but haven't registered as unemployed. Free to search for appropriate work or tied down under the JSA regs is between a rock and a hard place. 16-24 unemployment is likely to be much worse than even these numbers suggest
I suspect the situation is much worse than the stats suggest in the more affluent areas of the UK. Plenty of graduates have returned to the parental home in order to seek work but haven't registered as unemployed. Free to search for appropriate work or tied down under the JSA regs is between a rock and a hard place. 16-24 unemployment is likely to be much worse than even these numbers suggest Elizabeth71

8:54pm Thu 22 Nov 12

LutherBlissett88 says...

One issue with measuring unemployment among 16-24 year olds is that areas with large student populations are going to have the unemployment rate of their local youths massively underestimated. So for example Oxford has approx 45,000 students at its two universities (leaving aside mature students, older postgrads and those not living in the city, a reasonable estimate would be around 35,000 students in the denominator of approx 45,000 16-24 year olds). as students are not eligible for JSA, the overall proportion of people unemployed is very low 1.6%. But take the students out of the denominator and the figure is significantly higher at 7.1% of non-student population.
There a are a number of arguments for excluding the students (many are not there for approx half the year and are not part of the long term local labour market and are not economically active by and large)
One issue with measuring unemployment among 16-24 year olds is that areas with large student populations are going to have the unemployment rate of their local youths massively underestimated. So for example Oxford has approx 45,000 students at its two universities (leaving aside mature students, older postgrads and those not living in the city, a reasonable estimate would be around 35,000 students in the denominator of approx 45,000 16-24 year olds). as students are not eligible for JSA, the overall proportion of people unemployed is very low 1.6%. But take the students out of the denominator and the figure is significantly higher at 7.1% of non-student population. There a are a number of arguments for excluding the students (many are not there for approx half the year and are not part of the long term local labour market and are not economically active by and large) LutherBlissett88

12:49pm Fri 23 Nov 12

Elizabeth71 says...

The plan is to raise the age of retirement, whilst keeping the young unemployed. The old supporting the young rather than the other way around.
The plan is to raise the age of retirement, whilst keeping the young unemployed. The old supporting the young rather than the other way around. Elizabeth71

12:51pm Fri 23 Nov 12

Elizabeth71 says...

Government figures released state that only 2.6 million people are out of work. Everyone knows how the Government papers are fudged and fiddled to show any number you want - it has been proved that they have issued such figures regularly. These figures ignore those who are working voluntary (to gain work experience), ignore those forced into part time work, ignore those who are on tax credits, ignore those who are looking for employment but not signing on. The true figures are more than 6.3 million UK people looking for work. Based on the again fiddled numbers of 70 million population - it is far more than this, but we will use this number as UK citizens only - then the number possibly employable is say - approximately less than half this number i.e. 30 million people. Rounding up we have 6 million out of 30 million out of work = 1 person in every five people is out of a job! We have people in their twenty's who have never found a decent job, we have youngsters on short time temporary work, we have older people not bringing in sufficient to pay a mortgage and feed a family. The government's priority should be to put all UK nationals into full time work!
Government figures released state that only 2.6 million people are out of work. Everyone knows how the Government papers are fudged and fiddled to show any number you want - it has been proved that they have issued such figures regularly. These figures ignore those who are working voluntary (to gain work experience), ignore those forced into part time work, ignore those who are on tax credits, ignore those who are looking for employment but not signing on. The true figures are more than 6.3 million UK people looking for work. Based on the again fiddled numbers of 70 million population - it is far more than this, but we will use this number as UK citizens only - then the number possibly employable is say - approximately less than half this number i.e. 30 million people. Rounding up we have 6 million out of 30 million out of work = 1 person in every five people is out of a job! We have people in their twenty's who have never found a decent job, we have youngsters on short time temporary work, we have older people not bringing in sufficient to pay a mortgage and feed a family. The government's priority should be to put all UK nationals into full time work! Elizabeth71

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