Kings Langley School students to welcome Holocaust survivor Harry Bibring for Holocaust Educational Trust talk

Sixth form students at Kings Langley School will hear a testimony from a Holocaust survivor next month.

As part of a visit organised by the Holocaust Educational Trust (HET), the pupils will hear from Harry Bibring on January 9.

The testimony will be followed by a question and answer session to enable students to better understand the nature of the Holocaust and to explore its lessons in more depth.

The visit is part of the Holocaust Educational Trust’s extensive all year round Outreach Programme, which is available to schools across the UK.

Gary Lewis, headteacher at Kings Langley School, said: "It is a privilege for us to welcome Harry Bibring to our school and his testimony will remain a powerful reminder of the horrors so many experienced. We are grateful to the Holocaust Educational Trust for co-ordinating the visit and we hope that by hearing Harry’s testimony, it will encourage our students to learn from the lessons of the Holocaust and make a positive difference in their own lives."

Karen Pollock MBE, chief executive of the Holocaust Educational Trust, added: "The Holocaust Educational Trust educates and engages students from across the UK, from all communities about the Holocaust and there can be no better way than through the first-hand testimony of a survivor. Harry’s story is one of tremendous courage during horrific circumstances and by hearing his testimony, students will have the opportunity to learn where prejudice and racism can ultimately lead.

"At the Trust, we impart the history of the Holocaust to young people, to ensure that we honour the memory of those whose lives were lost and take forward the lessons taught by those who survived."

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10:33am Wed 11 Dec 13

garston tony says...

Acidrainman wrote:
Aaaaah.... The second holocaust raises it's head once again on the school curriculum, lest we forget. How about the department for education adjust the curriculum and also teach our children about the FIRST Holocaust, perpetrated by the English against the Irish and wrapped up in a politically correct fairy tale of a potato famine? Shame, perhaps?....
Cant speak for every school but I was taught about the potato famine when I was at school, as were my kids (who went to a different school than I did) so not sure what you're on about really
[quote][p][bold]Acidrainman[/bold] wrote: Aaaaah.... The second holocaust raises it's head once again on the school curriculum, lest we forget. How about the department for education adjust the curriculum and also teach our children about the FIRST Holocaust, perpetrated by the English against the Irish and wrapped up in a politically correct fairy tale of a potato famine? Shame, perhaps?....[/p][/quote]Cant speak for every school but I was taught about the potato famine when I was at school, as were my kids (who went to a different school than I did) so not sure what you're on about really garston tony

11:11am Wed 11 Dec 13

Harry Caine says...

Perhaps it might be interesting to hear how some of the other victims of the Holocaust feel about the way it is presented these days. The Roma, LBG's, Polish Catholics, Disabled people, people with learning difficulties, Russian POW's, Communists, political dissidents and the all other 6 million; when are we going to hear more about how they were victimised and done to death?
Perhaps it might be interesting to hear how some of the other victims of the Holocaust feel about the way it is presented these days. The Roma, LBG's, Polish Catholics, Disabled people, people with learning difficulties, Russian POW's, Communists, political dissidents and the all other 6 million; when are we going to hear more about how they were victimised and done to death? Harry Caine

3:00pm Wed 11 Dec 13

garston tony says...

Harry Caine wrote:
Perhaps it might be interesting to hear how some of the other victims of the Holocaust feel about the way it is presented these days. The Roma, LBG's, Polish Catholics, Disabled people, people with learning difficulties, Russian POW's, Communists, political dissidents and the all other 6 million; when are we going to hear more about how they were victimised and done to death?
You appear to have a grievance about this talk, not sure why? This man has a story to tell that and it is important it is still heard, it may be one of 20+ million but the fact it is from a Jewish perspective doesnt dilute what we can all learn from it even today.

No the Jews were not the only group suffering in the holocaust, but they were by far the largest single group and we probably hear more about them for the pure mathematics that more of them survived and large numbers of those survivors scattered across the world after the war. That's not their 'fault' nor is it their 'fault' that there are probably precious few people from the other groups that came to these shores after the war and therefore that their story is often overshadowed.

Having said that there is a lot of information available about the other groups that the Germans also picked on that can be accessed with relative ease and i'm sure if you're that het up about it you could easily arrange some sort of event to highlight the trauma they suffered too.
[quote][p][bold]Harry Caine[/bold] wrote: Perhaps it might be interesting to hear how some of the other victims of the Holocaust feel about the way it is presented these days. The Roma, LBG's, Polish Catholics, Disabled people, people with learning difficulties, Russian POW's, Communists, political dissidents and the all other 6 million; when are we going to hear more about how they were victimised and done to death?[/p][/quote]You appear to have a grievance about this talk, not sure why? This man has a story to tell that and it is important it is still heard, it may be one of 20+ million but the fact it is from a Jewish perspective doesnt dilute what we can all learn from it even today. No the Jews were not the only group suffering in the holocaust, but they were by far the largest single group and we probably hear more about them for the pure mathematics that more of them survived and large numbers of those survivors scattered across the world after the war. That's not their 'fault' nor is it their 'fault' that there are probably precious few people from the other groups that came to these shores after the war and therefore that their story is often overshadowed. Having said that there is a lot of information available about the other groups that the Germans also picked on that can be accessed with relative ease and i'm sure if you're that het up about it you could easily arrange some sort of event to highlight the trauma they suffered too. garston tony

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