Father Mark Diggens 'fuming' at Bushey Meads School treatment of charity head-shave daughter Jade Diggens

Watford Observer: Mark Diggens with Jade. Mark Diggens with Jade.

The father of a 14-year-old girl has expressed his anger at a Bushey school for putting his daughter in isolation after she shaved her head in memory of her grandparents.

Mark Diggens said he is "fuming" at Bushey Meads School after they did not allow his daughter Jade to sit her GCSE Physics exam last week.

Jade Diggens decided to have her hair chopped last Thursday after being inspired by singer Jessie J, who did in March for Comic Relief.

Having lost grandparents to cancer, Jade wanted to help raise money for Cancer research, and recently took part in a race for life.

Mr Diggens said they were expecting a fallout after the shave but did not think his daughter would not be allowed to sit an exam.

He said: "This has turned into a nightmare. Jade was told before she shaved her head there would be consequences, most likely that she would be put in isolation.

"What we did not know is that she would be forced to miss one exam and take another in unacceptable conditions. We are absolutely fuming,"

Jade was due to take a Physics GCSE on Friday but Mr Diggens said she was not allowed to sit it. She had a Maths exam on Monday, which she was allowed to sit in the library away from her peers.

Mr Diggens continued: "Jade was very upset because the library was loud and she could not concentrate.

"This whole situation is taking its toll emotionally on Jade and not only is she facing educational isolation, she is being socially isolated.

"All me and my wife want is for Jade to be allowed to continue with mainstream learning and given the same amount of work as her peers."

Mr Diggens said Jade was not allowed outside with her friends at break time, and is having to go to lunch before the other pupils.

The 45-year-old continued: "It is ridiculous. Jade has told us she would not change a thing. We are proud she has done this amazing thing for charity and are not ashamed of what she has done.

"Year 10 is a crucial time for children’s education and to be put in isolation is not acceptable. Her education should not be made to suffer.

"In my honest opinion I think the school are embarrassed of her. We will continue to support her throughout. We are upset because social standing is important to a 14-year-old girl and she is being made to suffer."

The school was approached for comment and said Jade was back in class.

Headteacher Keith Douglas said: "Any student who arrives at school with an extreme haircut is in breach of Bushey Meads school rules. "However in the case of the student in this instance, I can confirm that she is in class only because I realise that this is in aid of charity.

"I have however requested that she wears a hat through this week to the end of term."

Jade has raised £300 to date for cancer research and is still collecting.

Bushey Meads is not the first school in the area to take a hard line stance on charity head shaves. For more on a recent similar case in St Albans see here

Comments (74)

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9:39am Thu 19 Dec 13

Hornets number 12 fan says...

Jobsworth!
Jobsworth! Hornets number 12 fan

10:44am Thu 19 Dec 13

grahamtaylorismydad says...

beyond belief, the headmaster should hang his head in shame
beyond belief, the headmaster should hang his head in shame grahamtaylorismydad

10:48am Thu 19 Dec 13

jasonwatford says...

Another case of a headteacher with no common sense
Another case of a headteacher with no common sense jasonwatford

10:57am Thu 19 Dec 13

pr76uk says...

So she was told not to do something, did it anyway, and was subsequently punished in a way consistent with the discipline policy of the school.

A life lesson learnt.
So she was told not to do something, did it anyway, and was subsequently punished in a way consistent with the discipline policy of the school. A life lesson learnt. pr76uk

11:11am Thu 19 Dec 13

garston tony says...

I totally agree that making someone miss an exam is not acceptable, any 'punishment' should have taken place at a far more appropriate time.

I do however wonder at a parent who allows their child to do something in the full knowledge that there will be consequences for them at school.
I totally agree that making someone miss an exam is not acceptable, any 'punishment' should have taken place at a far more appropriate time. I do however wonder at a parent who allows their child to do something in the full knowledge that there will be consequences for them at school. garston tony

11:18am Thu 19 Dec 13

grahamtaylorismydad says...

pr76uk wrote:
So she was told not to do something, did it anyway, and was subsequently punished in a way consistent with the discipline policy of the school.

A life lesson learnt.
did you bother to read the story properly, sounds like a daughter to be proud of......oh and merry Christmas to you
[quote][p][bold]pr76uk[/bold] wrote: So she was told not to do something, did it anyway, and was subsequently punished in a way consistent with the discipline policy of the school. A life lesson learnt.[/p][/quote]did you bother to read the story properly, sounds like a daughter to be proud of......oh and merry Christmas to you grahamtaylorismydad

11:20am Thu 19 Dec 13

Angelaht says...

From the school website:

‘Cult’ hairstyles: These are not allowed. If students come to school with cult hairstyles, their parents will be asked to have the hairstyle changed to an acceptable style. Until this is done the student will work in isolation from their peers. Please note: Deciding which hairstyles are ‘cult’ and which are ‘acceptable’ is the prerogative of the school’s Senior Leadership Team.

I don't even know what 'cult' hairstyles means! But I am fairly sure if a male student came to school with this haircut he would not be similarly discriminated against.

I hope Mr. Douglas makes a hefty contribution to her fundraising!
Go Jade!
From the school website: ‘Cult’ hairstyles: These are not allowed. If students come to school with cult hairstyles, their parents will be asked to have the hairstyle changed to an acceptable style. Until this is done the student will work in isolation from their peers. Please note: Deciding which hairstyles are ‘cult’ and which are ‘acceptable’ is the prerogative of the school’s Senior Leadership Team. I don't even know what 'cult' hairstyles means! But I am fairly sure if a male student came to school with this haircut he would not be similarly discriminated against. I hope Mr. Douglas makes a hefty contribution to her fundraising! Go Jade! Angelaht

11:26am Thu 19 Dec 13

Hornets number 12 fan says...

Angelaht wrote:
From the school website:

‘Cult’ hairstyles: These are not allowed. If students come to school with cult hairstyles, their parents will be asked to have the hairstyle changed to an acceptable style. Until this is done the student will work in isolation from their peers. Please note: Deciding which hairstyles are ‘cult’ and which are ‘acceptable’ is the prerogative of the school’s Senior Leadership Team.

I don't even know what 'cult' hairstyles means! But I am fairly sure if a male student came to school with this haircut he would not be similarly discriminated against.

I hope Mr. Douglas makes a hefty contribution to her fundraising!
Go Jade!
I wouldn't consider a hair cut for charity to be a "Cult Hairstyle" whatever the hell one of those actually is! Well done Jade! Merry Christmas to you and your family and a large two finger salute to your headmaster!
[quote][p][bold]Angelaht[/bold] wrote: From the school website: ‘Cult’ hairstyles: These are not allowed. If students come to school with cult hairstyles, their parents will be asked to have the hairstyle changed to an acceptable style. Until this is done the student will work in isolation from their peers. Please note: Deciding which hairstyles are ‘cult’ and which are ‘acceptable’ is the prerogative of the school’s Senior Leadership Team. I don't even know what 'cult' hairstyles means! But I am fairly sure if a male student came to school with this haircut he would not be similarly discriminated against. I hope Mr. Douglas makes a hefty contribution to her fundraising! Go Jade![/p][/quote]I wouldn't consider a hair cut for charity to be a "Cult Hairstyle" whatever the hell one of those actually is! Well done Jade! Merry Christmas to you and your family and a large two finger salute to your headmaster! Hornets number 12 fan

11:27am Thu 19 Dec 13

CaptainPC says...

Why do people feel the need to publicise their private problems in the WO?

Why does the WO pander to them?
Why do people feel the need to publicise their private problems in the WO? Why does the WO pander to them? CaptainPC

11:44am Thu 19 Dec 13

angryangryangry says...

What a ridiculous way for a school to act! Surely it is personal preferance to have their hair however they want! And as this for for charity too makes it even more pathetic!

These schools seem to have far too much power!
What a ridiculous way for a school to act! Surely it is personal preferance to have their hair however they want! And as this for for charity too makes it even more pathetic! These schools seem to have far too much power! angryangryangry

11:48am Thu 19 Dec 13

TRT says...

I know I'll be down-voted for this, but would it really have been that much bother to check with the school BEFORE doing this?
I know I'll be down-voted for this, but would it really have been that much bother to check with the school BEFORE doing this? TRT

11:53am Thu 19 Dec 13

deadphill says...

Often when I was at Bushey Meads (albeit a while back) we were always told that certain policies were in place due to the outside world being the same. So if I did not wear a suit I would not keep a job, which I can relate to. I would get punished if I didnt wear my blazer shirt tie and trousers.

What I cannot relate to is if a boy shaves his head, there would be nothing said, as its not "cult like" to do this. But a girl does this and she gets this treatment. I see it as no business of the schools the reasons for doing it. In the outside world if she were treated in her job differently because she shaved her head it would be called discrimination or constructive dismissal.

As for the uniform racket this school headteacher seems to employ is out of order to. I wouldn't be checked if my trousers said Primark instead of Prada at work, so why should the students have the same treatment. Now most of us know the real reason is so the school cashes in on the kickback they get for enforcing the policy. If your work insists on everyone wearing the same uniform would you expect to have to pay for it? I wouldn't so if you are setting these kids up for the outside world, this school has to be consistent with how it is out there, and not misuse their powers.

I know the arguments for and against what this headteacher is trying to do. But screwing parents by not being able to shop around for their kids clothes and remarking upon how they do their hair is for me taking it too far.
Often when I was at Bushey Meads (albeit a while back) we were always told that certain policies were in place due to the outside world being the same. So if I did not wear a suit I would not keep a job, which I can relate to. I would get punished if I didnt wear my blazer shirt tie and trousers. What I cannot relate to is if a boy shaves his head, there would be nothing said, as its not "cult like" to do this. But a girl does this and she gets this treatment. I see it as no business of the schools the reasons for doing it. In the outside world if she were treated in her job differently because she shaved her head it would be called discrimination or constructive dismissal. As for the uniform racket this school headteacher seems to employ is out of order to. I wouldn't be checked if my trousers said Primark instead of Prada at work, so why should the students have the same treatment. Now most of us know the real reason is so the school cashes in on the kickback they get for enforcing the policy. If your work insists on everyone wearing the same uniform would you expect to have to pay for it? I wouldn't so if you are setting these kids up for the outside world, this school has to be consistent with how it is out there, and not misuse their powers. I know the arguments for and against what this headteacher is trying to do. But screwing parents by not being able to shop around for their kids clothes and remarking upon how they do their hair is for me taking it too far. deadphill

12:10pm Thu 19 Dec 13

dented says...

"Mr Diggens said they were expecting a fallout after the shave"

Surely it would've been better to check with the school before the event rather than run to the WO afterwards?
"Mr Diggens said they were expecting a fallout after the shave" Surely it would've been better to check with the school before the event rather than run to the WO afterwards? dented

12:17pm Thu 19 Dec 13

TRT says...

Just re-read the article. Apparently they did check with the school.
"He said: "This has turned into a nightmare. Jade was told before she shaved her head there would be consequences, most likely that she would be put in isolation.""

So the headline should really read "Father angry after something he was told would happen, happened."
Just re-read the article. Apparently they did check with the school. "He said: "This has turned into a nightmare. Jade was told before she shaved her head there would be consequences, most likely that she would be put in isolation."" So the headline should really read "Father angry after something he was told would happen, happened." TRT

12:18pm Thu 19 Dec 13

edhorn says...

This is sexual discrimation plain and simple, as the contributor above has already said. If a boy did it there would be no comment, if a girl does it she's treated as being in a cult. A short haircut is not a cult haircut. Why on earth do people believe that all girls have to have long hair? The headmaster needs to take a long look at himself. Jade, I think the haircut looks brilliant and it suits you. Well done!
This is sexual discrimation plain and simple, as the contributor above has already said. If a boy did it there would be no comment, if a girl does it she's treated as being in a cult. A short haircut is not a cult haircut. Why on earth do people believe that all girls have to have long hair? The headmaster needs to take a long look at himself. Jade, I think the haircut looks brilliant and it suits you. Well done! edhorn

12:23pm Thu 19 Dec 13

TRT says...

"If a boy did it there would be no comment,"

Are you sure? Are you REALLY sure? Have you checked with the school?
Where I went had a "no skinheads" rule; 1" minimum over the majority of the head. Equally applicable to male and female alike.
"If a boy did it there would be no comment," Are you sure? Are you REALLY sure? Have you checked with the school? Where I went had a "no skinheads" rule; 1" minimum over the majority of the head. Equally applicable to male and female alike. TRT

12:32pm Thu 19 Dec 13

TRT says...

I mean, all I'm saying is that if my child suggested shaving their head to raise money for a charity, and I'd checked with the school and they'd said "it breaches our rules and will end up with isolation", and if I felt that strongly about it and taken it to the head and he'd said the same, I'd probably be saying to my child "look, why don't you think of another way to raise funds for charity, eh?"

If I really, really, really felt that the school policy was wrong in principle, badly worded, inappropriately applied etc. I'd be taking it to the head of the board of governors, the schools department of the County Council or whosoever was in charge of the school and eventually the Education Secretary.

I certainly wouldn't be saying "go ahead and do it anyway" and then go bleating to the papers when it all goes exactly as expected. Obviously the social stigma and consequences of being in isolation can't be that much of a trauma, or it wouldn't have been worth the risk, would it?
I mean, all I'm saying is that if my child suggested shaving their head to raise money for a charity, and I'd checked with the school and they'd said "it breaches our rules and will end up with isolation", and if I felt that strongly about it and taken it to the head and he'd said the same, I'd probably be saying to my child "look, why don't you think of another way to raise funds for charity, eh?" If I really, really, really felt that the school policy was wrong in principle, badly worded, inappropriately applied etc. I'd be taking it to the head of the board of governors, the schools department of the County Council or whosoever was in charge of the school and eventually the Education Secretary. I certainly wouldn't be saying "go ahead and do it anyway" and then go bleating to the papers when it all goes exactly as expected. Obviously the social stigma and consequences of being in isolation can't be that much of a trauma, or it wouldn't have been worth the risk, would it? TRT

12:37pm Thu 19 Dec 13

The Not-so-enlightened one says...

Whilst agreeing that people should be proud of what Jade has done in raising money for her chosen charity, surely, having checked with the school and been told there would be consequences, the parents should have made Jade wait until after her exams to have her head shaved? Congratulations to Jade on her fund-raising, castigation for her parents for showing a lack of guidance to their child and lack of common sense in general. It is they, not the school that have jeopardised her education.
Whilst agreeing that people should be proud of what Jade has done in raising money for her chosen charity, surely, having checked with the school and been told there would be consequences, the parents should have made Jade wait until after her exams to have her head shaved? Congratulations to Jade on her fund-raising, castigation for her parents for showing a lack of guidance to their child and lack of common sense in general. It is they, not the school that have jeopardised her education. The Not-so-enlightened one

12:46pm Thu 19 Dec 13

XxMaseyxX says...

I'm sorry but I think a lot of people are missing the point. THIS WAS FOR CHARITY! ! Surely the school should have been a lot more supportive. I'm slightly biased at the minute probably having lost my mum to cancer only a few weeks ago. This disease is horrendous not only for the person suffering, but for the people caring for them. The more money raised to help in the research of cancer and eventually a cure can only be a good thing and anyone prepared to go to any lengths to assist in this can only be commended in my eyes. If this beautiful young lady did something to aid many others why should she be punished in any way? Hairstyles do not affect the capabilities to learn, nor are they detrimental to others. I think the school needs to make an apology to this young star and also to those of us that have taken massive offence to her treatment. I'm so upset and angry that for someone that has stuck to their principles, and done such a good dead, for a massively good cause can be treated so appallingly. Mrs S Mason - South Oxhey
I'm sorry but I think a lot of people are missing the point. THIS WAS FOR CHARITY! ! Surely the school should have been a lot more supportive. I'm slightly biased at the minute probably having lost my mum to cancer only a few weeks ago. This disease is horrendous not only for the person suffering, but for the people caring for them. The more money raised to help in the research of cancer and eventually a cure can only be a good thing and anyone prepared to go to any lengths to assist in this can only be commended in my eyes. If this beautiful young lady did something to aid many others why should she be punished in any way? Hairstyles do not affect the capabilities to learn, nor are they detrimental to others. I think the school needs to make an apology to this young star and also to those of us that have taken massive offence to her treatment. I'm so upset and angry that for someone that has stuck to their principles, and done such a good dead, for a massively good cause can be treated so appallingly. Mrs S Mason - South Oxhey XxMaseyxX

12:57pm Thu 19 Dec 13

PCllrRRidley says...

Why couldn't she have her head shaved after the exams and just prior to the school holidays? Some schools have a no shorter than a grade 3 clipper for boys who attend, so in these days of equality, the same might apply to girls.

How much was raised, as can't see anything in article.
Why couldn't she have her head shaved after the exams and just prior to the school holidays? Some schools have a no shorter than a grade 3 clipper for boys who attend, so in these days of equality, the same might apply to girls. How much was raised, as can't see anything in article. PCllrRRidley

12:57pm Thu 19 Dec 13

PCllrRRidley says...

Why couldn't she have her head shaved after the exams and just prior to the school holidays? Some schools have a no shorter than a grade 3 clipper for boys who attend, so in these days of equality, the same might apply to girls.

How much was raised, as can't see anything in article.
Why couldn't she have her head shaved after the exams and just prior to the school holidays? Some schools have a no shorter than a grade 3 clipper for boys who attend, so in these days of equality, the same might apply to girls. How much was raised, as can't see anything in article. PCllrRRidley

12:59pm Thu 19 Dec 13

TRT says...

"I'm sorry but I think a lot of people are missing the point. THIS WAS FOR CHARITY! "
Doing something for charity is not a "Get out of jail free" card. Whilst I agree with your sentiments about fundraising and sympathise with your loss of a near and dear one, I can only say that (1) there are other ways to raise money (2) they were warned of the school's stance on hair cuts beforehand and (3) why should the school apologise?

There seems to be confusion here about "sticking to principles". The principle seems to have become "I should be allowed to shave my head" not "I should be allowed to fund raise for charity". Imagine how much more she could have raised if they'd have had, say, a non-uniform day across the whole school, or a silly-hat day, or a bake sale?

I have to side with the school, I'm afraid. Not that their rule is right or clear or unambiguous or non-sexist, but that they stuck to what they said they would do. Well, at least until someone shouted loud and ran crying to the paper... then they backed down which just goes to reinforce the view that those who shout loudest get their own way.
"I'm sorry but I think a lot of people are missing the point. THIS WAS FOR CHARITY! " Doing something for charity is not a "Get out of jail free" card. Whilst I agree with your sentiments about fundraising and sympathise with your loss of a near and dear one, I can only say that (1) there are other ways to raise money (2) they were warned of the school's stance on hair cuts beforehand and (3) why should the school apologise? There seems to be confusion here about "sticking to principles". The principle seems to have become "I should be allowed to shave my head" not "I should be allowed to fund raise for charity". Imagine how much more she could have raised if they'd have had, say, a non-uniform day across the whole school, or a silly-hat day, or a bake sale? I have to side with the school, I'm afraid. Not that their rule is right or clear or unambiguous or non-sexist, but that they stuck to what they said they would do. Well, at least until someone shouted loud and ran crying to the paper... then they backed down which just goes to reinforce the view that those who shout loudest get their own way. TRT

1:05pm Thu 19 Dec 13

PCllrRRidley says...

Sorry £300 raised so far, missed it.
Sorry £300 raised so far, missed it. PCllrRRidley

3:02pm Thu 19 Dec 13

Aryldi says...

Given that the school had said there would be consequences, the parents should have asked what these would be before agreeing to the haircut.

Was it absolutely necessary to shave the hair so close to the end of term rather than afterwards, when it would not impact on her exams, and would have had time to grow back enough over the 2 week break?

It is a disgrace for the child to be excluded from an exam due to a haircut - regardless of the reason. If she had dyed her hair fluorescent yellow and styled it as a mohawk, she should still have been allowed to sit her exam - with punishment later on. It is not unreasonable, however, for her to be asked to wear a headscarf, to comply with uniform policy.

I would question whether the exam would have been a GCSE, given that it is December - more likely to be a mock GCSE, which is far less critical.
Given that the school had said there would be consequences, the parents should have asked what these would be before agreeing to the haircut. Was it absolutely necessary to shave the hair so close to the end of term rather than afterwards, when it would not impact on her exams, and would have had time to grow back enough over the 2 week break? It is a disgrace for the child to be excluded from an exam due to a haircut - regardless of the reason. If she had dyed her hair fluorescent yellow and styled it as a mohawk, she should still have been allowed to sit her exam - with punishment later on. It is not unreasonable, however, for her to be asked to wear a headscarf, to comply with uniform policy. I would question whether the exam would have been a GCSE, given that it is December - more likely to be a mock GCSE, which is far less critical. Aryldi

3:39pm Thu 19 Dec 13

CaptainPC says...

edhorn wrote:
This is sexual discrimation plain and simple, as the contributor above has already said. If a boy did it there would be no comment, if a girl does it she's treated as being in a cult. A short haircut is not a cult haircut. Why on earth do people believe that all girls have to have long hair? The headmaster needs to take a long look at himself. Jade, I think the haircut looks brilliant and it suits you. Well done!
Do you know that or are you guessing?

I went to BM (ages ago) and you weren't allowed to have a skinhead haircut.

I'm male by the way.....
[quote][p][bold]edhorn[/bold] wrote: This is sexual discrimation plain and simple, as the contributor above has already said. If a boy did it there would be no comment, if a girl does it she's treated as being in a cult. A short haircut is not a cult haircut. Why on earth do people believe that all girls have to have long hair? The headmaster needs to take a long look at himself. Jade, I think the haircut looks brilliant and it suits you. Well done![/p][/quote]Do you know that or are you guessing? I went to BM (ages ago) and you weren't allowed to have a skinhead haircut. I'm male by the way..... CaptainPC

4:11pm Thu 19 Dec 13

Boosey says...

CaptainPC wrote:
edhorn wrote: This is sexual discrimation plain and simple, as the contributor above has already said. If a boy did it there would be no comment, if a girl does it she's treated as being in a cult. A short haircut is not a cult haircut. Why on earth do people believe that all girls have to have long hair? The headmaster needs to take a long look at himself. Jade, I think the haircut looks brilliant and it suits you. Well done!
Do you know that or are you guessing? I went to BM (ages ago) and you weren't allowed to have a skinhead haircut. I'm male by the way.....
Well theres a surprise!
[quote][p][bold]CaptainPC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]edhorn[/bold] wrote: This is sexual discrimation plain and simple, as the contributor above has already said. If a boy did it there would be no comment, if a girl does it she's treated as being in a cult. A short haircut is not a cult haircut. Why on earth do people believe that all girls have to have long hair? The headmaster needs to take a long look at himself. Jade, I think the haircut looks brilliant and it suits you. Well done![/p][/quote]Do you know that or are you guessing? I went to BM (ages ago) and you weren't allowed to have a skinhead haircut. I'm male by the way.....[/p][/quote]Well theres a surprise! Boosey

7:06pm Thu 19 Dec 13

XxMaseyxX says...

TRT wrote:
"I'm sorry but I think a lot of people are missing the point. THIS WAS FOR CHARITY! "
Doing something for charity is not a "Get out of jail free" card. Whilst I agree with your sentiments about fundraising and sympathise with your loss of a near and dear one, I can only say that (1) there are other ways to raise money (2) they were warned of the school's stance on hair cuts beforehand and (3) why should the school apologise?

There seems to be confusion here about "sticking to principles". The principle seems to have become "I should be allowed to shave my head" not "I should be allowed to fund raise for charity". Imagine how much more she could have raised if they'd have had, say, a non-uniform day across the whole school, or a silly-hat day, or a bake sale?

I have to side with the school, I'm afraid. Not that their rule is right or clear or unambiguous or non-sexist, but that they stuck to what they said they would do. Well, at least until someone shouted loud and ran crying to the paper... then they backed down which just goes to reinforce the view that those who shout loudest get their own way.
I wasn't saying it was a get out of jail card just cos it was for charity. I was saying the school should have shown a bit more support. The parents did check first and they were told there probably would be consequences, most likely isolation. However to stop a young person sitting an exam just because of a hair cut is ridiculous. Would they have treated a young person undergoing chemo with the same mentality if they'd had to shave they're head due to hair loss. I doubt it. The haircut would look the same yet wouldn't be classed as a cult cut due to illness. They would still be able to sit exams without being segregated. There should have been a little leniency due to the situation and reasoning that's all.
[quote][p][bold]TRT[/bold] wrote: "I'm sorry but I think a lot of people are missing the point. THIS WAS FOR CHARITY! " Doing something for charity is not a "Get out of jail free" card. Whilst I agree with your sentiments about fundraising and sympathise with your loss of a near and dear one, I can only say that (1) there are other ways to raise money (2) they were warned of the school's stance on hair cuts beforehand and (3) why should the school apologise? There seems to be confusion here about "sticking to principles". The principle seems to have become "I should be allowed to shave my head" not "I should be allowed to fund raise for charity". Imagine how much more she could have raised if they'd have had, say, a non-uniform day across the whole school, or a silly-hat day, or a bake sale? I have to side with the school, I'm afraid. Not that their rule is right or clear or unambiguous or non-sexist, but that they stuck to what they said they would do. Well, at least until someone shouted loud and ran crying to the paper... then they backed down which just goes to reinforce the view that those who shout loudest get their own way.[/p][/quote]I wasn't saying it was a get out of jail card just cos it was for charity. I was saying the school should have shown a bit more support. The parents did check first and they were told there probably would be consequences, most likely isolation. However to stop a young person sitting an exam just because of a hair cut is ridiculous. Would they have treated a young person undergoing chemo with the same mentality if they'd had to shave they're head due to hair loss. I doubt it. The haircut would look the same yet wouldn't be classed as a cult cut due to illness. They would still be able to sit exams without being segregated. There should have been a little leniency due to the situation and reasoning that's all. XxMaseyxX

7:26pm Thu 19 Dec 13

benbog says...

pr76uk wrote:
So she was told not to do something, did it anyway, and was subsequently punished in a way consistent with the discipline policy of the school.

A life lesson learnt.
So we should all agree to do everything we're told by people in authority just because they say so, even if the ruling is clearly wrong and we don't agree with it?
[quote][p][bold]pr76uk[/bold] wrote: So she was told not to do something, did it anyway, and was subsequently punished in a way consistent with the discipline policy of the school. A life lesson learnt.[/p][/quote]So we should all agree to do everything we're told by people in authority just because they say so, even if the ruling is clearly wrong and we don't agree with it? benbog

7:28pm Thu 19 Dec 13

Shelbykate says...

This girl did something to help others in need, I left bushey meads school 2 years back and i know what it's like to be socially isolated as i had the same treatment, Its a terrible school and they do not know what respect is and how to treat someone, Anyone who has any problems they deal with inappropriately, Especially because all they care about is that the school looks good. I hope Keith Douglas enjoys his new position at Rickmansworth as he's leaving the school he said was most precious to him. The school's a joke. They expect everyone to be the same and its not going to happen.
This girl did something to help others in need, I left bushey meads school 2 years back and i know what it's like to be socially isolated as i had the same treatment, Its a terrible school and they do not know what respect is and how to treat someone, Anyone who has any problems they deal with inappropriately, Especially because all they care about is that the school looks good. I hope Keith Douglas enjoys his new position at Rickmansworth as he's leaving the school he said was most precious to him. The school's a joke. They expect everyone to be the same and its not going to happen. Shelbykate

8:26pm Thu 19 Dec 13

shawks says...

I recently left bushey meads and was in the same year as jade, This kind of discrimination happens all to often at this school, the boys aren't even allowed their head shaved below a grade 2! Besides the fact this was for charity and a very brave thing to do! Bushey meads only cares about it's image and how it's seen to public. they pride themselves on being a school with no bullying but then they go and bully their students into feeling ashamed of being themselves or even just trying to be a decent human being and helping the community. This school is also a special needs school, and some children do not look the same and so what looks don't matter, they need to get off their high horse and stop making children not allowed to express themselves how they want to! This school is that of conformity and to be different is to be wrong and i personally think that's disgusting, Keith Douglas should be ashamed.
I recently left bushey meads and was in the same year as jade, This kind of discrimination happens all to often at this school, the boys aren't even allowed their head shaved below a grade 2! Besides the fact this was for charity and a very brave thing to do! Bushey meads only cares about it's image and how it's seen to public. they pride themselves on being a school with no bullying but then they go and bully their students into feeling ashamed of being themselves or even just trying to be a decent human being and helping the community. This school is also a special needs school, and some children do not look the same and so what looks don't matter, they need to get off their high horse and stop making children not allowed to express themselves how they want to! This school is that of conformity and to be different is to be wrong and i personally think that's disgusting, Keith Douglas should be ashamed. shawks

9:37pm Thu 19 Dec 13

AmySeymour92 says...

So they punish people for extreme hair cuts. This is in aid of charity but what if she wanted to shave her head anyway? It would be ok if a boy came in like that. What if her hair had fallen out due to illness. Would you isolate her because of that as well?!
So they punish people for extreme hair cuts. This is in aid of charity but what if she wanted to shave her head anyway? It would be ok if a boy came in like that. What if her hair had fallen out due to illness. Would you isolate her because of that as well?! AmySeymour92

10:49pm Thu 19 Dec 13

Ms H says...

Is this the same school who isolated my sons 8 days before the end of the academic year because i couldn't afford school shoes?? Is this also the same school who after i sent a letter in stating my financial predicament (working full time with no financial help from their Father) and that i had purchased 6 pairs of shoes for two children and they had a TA throw the letter back into my sons face and say 'We do not care about your mothers financial situation' O...i believe it is!

Yes you took him out to the Harlequin (as it was then) and purchased new shoes (i reimbursed the money) after i called the Daily Express and they were prepared to run with a story, but here's a thing, they were in school...TEACH! how their hair is or what is on their feet is meaningless the duty you have as an educational establishment is, is to teach them!
Is this the same school who isolated my sons 8 days before the end of the academic year because i couldn't afford school shoes?? Is this also the same school who after i sent a letter in stating my financial predicament (working full time with no financial help from their Father) and that i had purchased 6 pairs of shoes for two children and they had a TA throw the letter back into my sons face and say 'We do not care about your mothers financial situation' O...i believe it is! Yes you took him out to the Harlequin (as it was then) and purchased new shoes (i reimbursed the money) after i called the Daily Express and they were prepared to run with a story, but here's a thing, they were in school...TEACH! how their hair is or what is on their feet is meaningless the duty you have as an educational establishment is, is to teach them! Ms H

10:53pm Thu 19 Dec 13

LSC says...

benbog wrote:
pr76uk wrote:
So she was told not to do something, did it anyway, and was subsequently punished in a way consistent with the discipline policy of the school.

A life lesson learnt.
So we should all agree to do everything we're told by people in authority just because they say so, even if the ruling is clearly wrong and we don't agree with it?
On the whole, yes.
But that doesn't mean the end of the story. If you have a case, there are quite a few ways to put it across for review.

A former pupil above states that boys wouldn't be allowed to do this either, which negates a lot of the comments on here.

I'm not a fan of this school after reading the uniform saga, but all schools have to draw a line. This line seemed clear enough.

This week it is a shaven head for charity. What next week? A luminous green mohican, for charity. Wearing no trousers, for charity. Standing on one leg during lessons, for charity. Bring your dog to school day. Wearing a fez. The possibilities are endless, so a line must be drawn.

It was, and for all her good motives this girl crossed it. End of story.
[quote][p][bold]benbog[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]pr76uk[/bold] wrote: So she was told not to do something, did it anyway, and was subsequently punished in a way consistent with the discipline policy of the school. A life lesson learnt.[/p][/quote]So we should all agree to do everything we're told by people in authority just because they say so, even if the ruling is clearly wrong and we don't agree with it?[/p][/quote]On the whole, yes. But that doesn't mean the end of the story. If you have a case, there are quite a few ways to put it across for review. A former pupil above states that boys wouldn't be allowed to do this either, which negates a lot of the comments on here. I'm not a fan of this school after reading the uniform saga, but all schools have to draw a line. This line seemed clear enough. This week it is a shaven head for charity. What next week? A luminous green mohican, for charity. Wearing no trousers, for charity. Standing on one leg during lessons, for charity. Bring your dog to school day. Wearing a fez. The possibilities are endless, so a line must be drawn. It was, and for all her good motives this girl crossed it. End of story. LSC

11:10pm Thu 19 Dec 13

LSC says...

Ms H wrote:
Is this the same school who isolated my sons 8 days before the end of the academic year because i couldn't afford school shoes?? Is this also the same school who after i sent a letter in stating my financial predicament (working full time with no financial help from their Father) and that i had purchased 6 pairs of shoes for two children and they had a TA throw the letter back into my sons face and say 'We do not care about your mothers financial situation' O...i believe it is!

Yes you took him out to the Harlequin (as it was then) and purchased new shoes (i reimbursed the money) after i called the Daily Express and they were prepared to run with a story, but here's a thing, they were in school...TEACH! how their hair is or what is on their feet is meaningless the duty you have as an educational establishment is, is to teach them!
Ms H, I sympathise with your financial situation, but you do demand that they TEACH while acknowledging they took your child shopping. How many children was that staff member able to teach at the Harlequin? How much paperwork did they have to fill in for that while they could have been teaching?

I see you called the Daily Mail, I presume from a phone box or from work, because I personally would go without food, let alone a telephone, before my children didn't have shoes on their feet.
[quote][p][bold]Ms H[/bold] wrote: Is this the same school who isolated my sons 8 days before the end of the academic year because i couldn't afford school shoes?? Is this also the same school who after i sent a letter in stating my financial predicament (working full time with no financial help from their Father) and that i had purchased 6 pairs of shoes for two children and they had a TA throw the letter back into my sons face and say 'We do not care about your mothers financial situation' O...i believe it is! Yes you took him out to the Harlequin (as it was then) and purchased new shoes (i reimbursed the money) after i called the Daily Express and they were prepared to run with a story, but here's a thing, they were in school...TEACH! how their hair is or what is on their feet is meaningless the duty you have as an educational establishment is, is to teach them![/p][/quote]Ms H, I sympathise with your financial situation, but you do demand that they TEACH while acknowledging they took your child shopping. How many children was that staff member able to teach at the Harlequin? How much paperwork did they have to fill in for that while they could have been teaching? I see you called the Daily Mail, I presume from a phone box or from work, because I personally would go without food, let alone a telephone, before my children didn't have shoes on their feet. LSC

12:02am Fri 20 Dec 13

LSC says...

I might as well add the obvious Ms H. You have internet access at 11 at night, which suggests you are not in some public building using it for free.
So you have a decent phone or a PC.
And yet you allow your children to be thrown out of school because you can't afford shoes, then complain about the people who buy them shoes. Yes you paid them back I'm sure, but not the wages and time.
You demand that teachers teach.
I demand that parents start parenting.
I might as well add the obvious Ms H. You have internet access at 11 at night, which suggests you are not in some public building using it for free. So you have a decent phone or a PC. And yet you allow your children to be thrown out of school because you can't afford shoes, then complain about the people who buy them shoes. Yes you paid them back I'm sure, but not the wages and time. You demand that teachers teach. I demand that parents start parenting. LSC

8:53am Fri 20 Dec 13

Ms H says...

LSC wrote:
I might as well add the obvious Ms H. You have internet access at 11 at night, which suggests you are not in some public building using it for free.
So you have a decent phone or a PC.
And yet you allow your children to be thrown out of school because you can't afford shoes, then complain about the people who buy them shoes. Yes you paid them back I'm sure, but not the wages and time.
You demand that teachers teach.
I demand that parents start parenting.
Assume a lot don't you!

My sons are 19 & 21 so this occurred 6/7 yrs ago, i didn't realise i needed to give a full biography for your purpose, bit like the TA at the school!

I purchased new shoes in the September x 2 and again if needed at October half term, if not, definitely in the New Year and again at Easter = £150/160 for the school year, just on shoes. Two growing boys, i do not know of any parent who would purchase shoes 11 days before the end of the academic year for them to sit for 6/7 wks for big feet to grow bigger.

Did i demand that they took him out of school? No i didn't! Was i held to ransom to pay the money back? i felt i was, did i? yes i did!

Called the Daily Mail? Errrr no it was the express!

Go without food to pay for what the CSA failed to do, oh yes i have, regularly! Working full time YES, pay the bills YES, made sure both my sons were in school YES. Did they go on elaborate school trips away with the school? Never i couldn't afford it!

I did parent and parented excellently to a point i put my own life on hold because i believe that's what you do, and FYI what happens NOW in my household has no bearing on 6/7 yrs ago and both of my sons are in well paid full time employment so i did something right.

I do not believe that a school has the right to hold parents to ransom over school uniform let alone isolate them, punish them for something that wasn't their fault.

So LSC don't make assumptions it's really not an attractive quality and makes you look like a bully.
[quote][p][bold]LSC[/bold] wrote: I might as well add the obvious Ms H. You have internet access at 11 at night, which suggests you are not in some public building using it for free. So you have a decent phone or a PC. And yet you allow your children to be thrown out of school because you can't afford shoes, then complain about the people who buy them shoes. Yes you paid them back I'm sure, but not the wages and time. You demand that teachers teach. I demand that parents start parenting.[/p][/quote]Assume a lot don't you! My sons are 19 & 21 so this occurred 6/7 yrs ago, i didn't realise i needed to give a full biography for your purpose, bit like the TA at the school! I purchased new shoes in the September x 2 and again if needed at October half term, if not, definitely in the New Year and again at Easter = £150/160 for the school year, just on shoes. Two growing boys, i do not know of any parent who would purchase shoes 11 days before the end of the academic year for them to sit for 6/7 wks for big feet to grow bigger. Did i demand that they took him out of school? No i didn't! Was i held to ransom to pay the money back? i felt i was, did i? yes i did! Called the Daily Mail? Errrr no it was the express! Go without food to pay for what the CSA failed to do, oh yes i have, regularly! Working full time YES, pay the bills YES, made sure both my sons were in school YES. Did they go on elaborate school trips away with the school? Never i couldn't afford it! I did parent and parented excellently to a point i put my own life on hold because i believe that's what you do, and FYI what happens NOW in my household has no bearing on 6/7 yrs ago and both of my sons are in well paid full time employment so i did something right. I do not believe that a school has the right to hold parents to ransom over school uniform let alone isolate them, punish them for something that wasn't their fault. So LSC don't make assumptions it's really not an attractive quality and makes you look like a bully. Ms H

9:21am Fri 20 Dec 13

Tanyawhitney@btinternet.com says...

OMG someone shaving their head is NOT an extreme hair cut. Sometimes for medical reasons people have to shave their hair off, does that mean they'd be punished too?... Mohican, pink hair, I completely understand. Whoever enforced such inappropriate punishment should be suspended due to ignorance & more importantly the emotional impact the punishment would of had on this very brave & courageous young lady. How does punishing a pupil for raising funds for charity teach values we'd like all children to have? Makes me feel like writing to The Right Honourable Michael Gove MP & Richard Harrington MP... Remarkable young lady, I bet her grand parents would be so proud of her x
OMG someone shaving their head is NOT an extreme hair cut. Sometimes for medical reasons people have to shave their hair off, does that mean they'd be punished too?... Mohican, pink hair, I completely understand. Whoever enforced such inappropriate punishment should be suspended due to ignorance & more importantly the emotional impact the punishment would of had on this very brave & courageous young lady. How does punishing a pupil for raising funds for charity teach values we'd like all children to have? Makes me feel like writing to The Right Honourable Michael Gove MP & Richard Harrington MP... Remarkable young lady, I bet her grand parents would be so proud of her x Tanyawhitney@btinternet.com

9:31am Fri 20 Dec 13

Phil Cox (UKIP) says...

School rules.

If you don't like them, try to change them, but if you flout them then you must expect the consequences, whether you agree with them or not.

Charity cannot be an excuse for going against school rules unless the school has first agreed to waive the rules.

If as a parent you then decide to break the rules anyway I fail to see how you can complain afterwards knowing full-well what you are doing. You really should have given better guidance to your child who by your own admission has suffered both personally and academically.

The poor girl should have been advised to wait until the summer holidays before shaving her head or should have chosen some other less drastic way of raising money for such a good cause.

Jessie J got away with it because she is a pop star, self-employed and her fans expect her to do whatever she wants, she does not have any such rules, she is an adult, you on the other hand are a schoolgirl and you and your parents were warned what might happen if you broke the rules.

I suggest any concerned parents try to change the school rules and good luck with that because this seems like an eminently sensible rule.

The School could have waived the rules but didn't. You knew that but still went ahead.

School rules are not always good rules, but they are the rules you agree to when you send your child to that school. If you don't like them, try to change them. If you want to flout them for charity, then ask the school first for permission. If they give exceptional permission, all is well, but if they say no and you go ahead anyway then I am sorry but you really have no-one to blame but yourself.

It's just a shame a young girl has suffered when all she wanted to do was do a good thing.

I am pleased things are now back to normal, for her sake.
School rules. If you don't like them, try to change them, but if you flout them then you must expect the consequences, whether you agree with them or not. Charity cannot be an excuse for going against school rules unless the school has first agreed to waive the rules. If as a parent you then decide to break the rules anyway I fail to see how you can complain afterwards knowing full-well what you are doing. You really should have given better guidance to your child who by your own admission has suffered both personally and academically. The poor girl should have been advised to wait until the summer holidays before shaving her head or should have chosen some other less drastic way of raising money for such a good cause. Jessie J got away with it because she is a pop star, self-employed and her fans expect her to do whatever she wants, she does not have any such rules, she is an adult, you on the other hand are a schoolgirl and you and your parents were warned what might happen if you broke the rules. I suggest any concerned parents try to change the school rules and good luck with that because this seems like an eminently sensible rule. The School could have waived the rules but didn't. You knew that but still went ahead. School rules are not always good rules, but they are the rules you agree to when you send your child to that school. If you don't like them, try to change them. If you want to flout them for charity, then ask the school first for permission. If they give exceptional permission, all is well, but if they say no and you go ahead anyway then I am sorry but you really have no-one to blame but yourself. It's just a shame a young girl has suffered when all she wanted to do was do a good thing. I am pleased things are now back to normal, for her sake. Phil Cox (UKIP)

10:18am Fri 20 Dec 13

Meofcourse says...

Well well well............... who are we to condemn and criticise on both parties.

As for turning on each other for having an opinion, shame on us.

There are right and wrongs in this world and we are responsible for which path we take, it is called choice.

With actions there are consequences, as we have clearly seen.
Well well well............... who are we to condemn and criticise on both parties. As for turning on each other for having an opinion, shame on us. There are right and wrongs in this world and we are responsible for which path we take, it is called choice. With actions there are consequences, as we have clearly seen. Meofcourse

10:24am Fri 20 Dec 13

Andrew Turpie says...

End of the day, the policies laid down by schools are usually available at any time and anyone via their websites in a .PDF format. These rules are not invented on the fly by heads, but by governors and the majority of governing bodies are made up of parent governors. They are also responsible for the revision and updating of these policies which is the signed off by the chair of governors.

The heads job is to ensure that the rules are adhered to and that no one gets any special treatment. Without these rules in place then the majority would then complain about favouritism and/or victimisation.

A case of damned if you do, damned if you don't.
End of the day, the policies laid down by schools are usually available at any time and anyone via their websites in a .PDF format. These rules are not invented on the fly by heads, but by governors and the majority of governing bodies are made up of parent governors. They are also responsible for the revision and updating of these policies which is the signed off by the chair of governors. The heads job is to ensure that the rules are adhered to and that no one gets any special treatment. Without these rules in place then the majority would then complain about favouritism and/or victimisation. A case of damned if you do, damned if you don't. Andrew Turpie

12:02pm Fri 20 Dec 13

Tanyawhitney@btinternet.com says...

Sorry folks, maybe I missing something here... This young lady has shaved her head!... What is so wrong that she needs to be punished?... What's she has done hasn't offended or harmed anyone, nor was it done to shock, she did a deed from the passion inside her heart to help others. Now if you think she should be punished for that, wait until the 6 weeks holiday or believe shes broken a rule - really?... Is this how you measure life?... Good on her, shame on the school... x
Sorry folks, maybe I missing something here... This young lady has shaved her head!... What is so wrong that she needs to be punished?... What's she has done hasn't offended or harmed anyone, nor was it done to shock, she did a deed from the passion inside her heart to help others. Now if you think she should be punished for that, wait until the 6 weeks holiday or believe shes broken a rule - really?... Is this how you measure life?... Good on her, shame on the school... x Tanyawhitney@btinternet.com

12:26pm Fri 20 Dec 13

TRT says...

Tanyawhitney@btinter
net.com
wrote:
Sorry folks, maybe I missing something here... This young lady has shaved her head!... What is so wrong that she needs to be punished?... What's she has done hasn't offended or harmed anyone, nor was it done to shock, she did a deed from the passion inside her heart to help others. Now if you think she should be punished for that, wait until the 6 weeks holiday or believe shes broken a rule - really?... Is this how you measure life?... Good on her, shame on the school... x
Yeah, read the article again, Tanya. Good on them that they checked before hand if head shaving would result in a consequence (punishment), but when they were told that it would breach the rules resulting in isolation, then went ahead and did it anyway, they've got no grounds to go running to the press crying 'Foul!'
It is one way I measure life, yes. You take the consequences for your own actions. If they had a problem with the rule, they could have challenged it through legitimate channels. Shame on the school? For enforcing their own rules? Is that how YOU measure life? Seeing how much you can get away with? Always edging 35 in a 30 zone? Handing in your library books a week late? Not tapping in with your travel card if you think you can get away with it?
[quote][p][bold]Tanyawhitney@btinter net.com[/bold] wrote: Sorry folks, maybe I missing something here... This young lady has shaved her head!... What is so wrong that she needs to be punished?... What's she has done hasn't offended or harmed anyone, nor was it done to shock, she did a deed from the passion inside her heart to help others. Now if you think she should be punished for that, wait until the 6 weeks holiday or believe shes broken a rule - really?... Is this how you measure life?... Good on her, shame on the school... x[/p][/quote]Yeah, read the article again, Tanya. Good on them that they checked before hand if head shaving would result in a consequence (punishment), but when they were told that it would breach the rules resulting in isolation, then went ahead and did it anyway, they've got no grounds to go running to the press crying 'Foul!' It is one way I measure life, yes. You take the consequences for your own actions. If they had a problem with the rule, they could have challenged it through legitimate channels. Shame on the school? For enforcing their own rules? Is that how YOU measure life? Seeing how much you can get away with? Always edging 35 in a 30 zone? Handing in your library books a week late? Not tapping in with your travel card if you think you can get away with it? TRT

12:49pm Fri 20 Dec 13

Tanyawhitney@btinternet.com says...

Do you know what, if bending a rule slightly helps saves another's life, YES I would do it!... The young lady has ONLY shaved her head, big deal - what is the fuss about, rules are rules which I accept, but so is using discretionary common sense. We live in a country that grants us freedom, freedom to help others, not rule & dictate another's life... Do you really think everyone in life lives their life by strict rules, even private sector companies or our Government - the answer is of course they don't... A rule is interpreted by the common sense it's applied by... One shaves their head for Charity = punishment... What does that teach?
Do you know what, if bending a rule slightly helps saves another's life, YES I would do it!... The young lady has ONLY shaved her head, big deal - what is the fuss about, rules are rules which I accept, but so is using discretionary common sense. We live in a country that grants us freedom, freedom to help others, not rule & dictate another's life... Do you really think everyone in life lives their life by strict rules, even private sector companies or our Government - the answer is of course they don't... A rule is interpreted by the common sense it's applied by... One shaves their head for Charity = punishment... What does that teach? Tanyawhitney@btinternet.com

1:01pm Fri 20 Dec 13

TRT says...

"One shaves their head for Charity = punishment... What does that teach?"

That if you break the rules, expect to get punished? I'd call that a valuable life lesson.

If they were so determined to raise funds for a charity, and were told that shaving the head would result in isolation, then why didn't they find another, more acceptable, way to raise money? With the support of the school they could have raised much more instead of ending up going to the papers and making themselves look like a bunch of whinging idiots. I'm sure they are not, of course, and I know that they've lost family to a terrible disease, but the point still stands that they shouldn't be bad mouthing the school this way. What does that teach? That school, authority, the head master, dress codes etc can just be ignored?
"One shaves their head for Charity = punishment... What does that teach?" That if you break the rules, expect to get punished? I'd call that a valuable life lesson. If they were so determined to raise funds for a charity, and were told that shaving the head would result in isolation, then why didn't they find another, more acceptable, way to raise money? With the support of the school they could have raised much more instead of ending up going to the papers and making themselves look like a bunch of whinging idiots. I'm sure they are not, of course, and I know that they've lost family to a terrible disease, but the point still stands that they shouldn't be bad mouthing the school this way. What does that teach? That school, authority, the head master, dress codes etc can just be ignored? TRT

1:07pm Fri 20 Dec 13

Tanyawhitney@btinternet.com says...

OMG someone shaving their head is NOT an extreme hair cut. Sometimes for medical reasons people have to shave their hair off, does that mean they'd be punished too?... Mohican, pink hair, I completely understand. Whoever enforced such inappropriate punishment should be suspended due to ignorance & more importantly the emotional impact the punishment would of had on this very brave & courageous young lady. How does punishing a pupil for raising funds for charity teach values we'd like all children to have? Makes me feel like writing to The Right Honourable Michael Gove MP & Richard Harrington MP... Remarkable young lady, I bet her grand parents would be so proud of her x
OMG someone shaving their head is NOT an extreme hair cut. Sometimes for medical reasons people have to shave their hair off, does that mean they'd be punished too?... Mohican, pink hair, I completely understand. Whoever enforced such inappropriate punishment should be suspended due to ignorance & more importantly the emotional impact the punishment would of had on this very brave & courageous young lady. How does punishing a pupil for raising funds for charity teach values we'd like all children to have? Makes me feel like writing to The Right Honourable Michael Gove MP & Richard Harrington MP... Remarkable young lady, I bet her grand parents would be so proud of her x Tanyawhitney@btinternet.com

1:27pm Fri 20 Dec 13

TRT says...

Did you actually read the article? I missed it the first time; THEY ASKED IN ADVANCE AND WERE TOLD IT WOULD RESULT IN ISOLATION.

Sorry for "shouting", but how can I make it any clearer?

I never said it was an extreme haircut and I know people lose hair for medical reasons etc etc. It's not my place to interpret the school policies. The point is that they asked someone in that position, were told it was a breach, they did it anyway and received the consequences. This is a total non-story. She was not punished for raising money for charity, that would be ludicrous; don't muddy the waters by confusing the issue. If my boss said I would get the sack for dressing as Pudsey Bear on Children In Need day, and that's what happened, I'd have a hard time claiming unfair dismissal.

Perhaps the school should have a policy on charity fundraising, something like "If pupils or staff wish to raise money or otherwise collect for a charity or a 'good cause', where it might come into conflict with another school policy or in some other way affect teaching, learning or the smooth running of activities at the school, they may do so only with the written permission of a member of the school management team." I'd say that was pretty much common sense, though.
Did you actually read the article? I missed it the first time; THEY ASKED IN ADVANCE AND WERE TOLD IT WOULD RESULT IN ISOLATION. Sorry for "shouting", but how can I make it any clearer? I never said it was an extreme haircut and I know people lose hair for medical reasons etc etc. It's not my place to interpret the school policies. The point is that they asked someone in that position, were told it was a breach, they did it anyway and received the consequences. This is a total non-story. She was not punished for raising money for charity, that would be ludicrous; don't muddy the waters by confusing the issue. If my boss said I would get the sack for dressing as Pudsey Bear on Children In Need day, and that's what happened, I'd have a hard time claiming unfair dismissal. Perhaps the school should have a policy on charity fundraising, something like "If pupils or staff wish to raise money or otherwise collect for a charity or a 'good cause', where it might come into conflict with another school policy or in some other way affect teaching, learning or the smooth running of activities at the school, they may do so only with the written permission of a member of the school management team." I'd say that was pretty much common sense, though. TRT

1:27pm Fri 20 Dec 13

Tanyawhitney@btinternet.com says...

Do you know what, I still don't see your point. Hindsight is a wonderful thing & if the young lady broke the rules twice fair enough that'd warrant some type of punishment. But it's the 1st time she has ever done this. The punishment was way too harsh nor was the young ladies emotional reason recognised. 14 years is a very young age to lose a grand parent. A bit of empathy should have been applied with a dash of common sense.
Do you know what, I still don't see your point. Hindsight is a wonderful thing & if the young lady broke the rules twice fair enough that'd warrant some type of punishment. But it's the 1st time she has ever done this. The punishment was way too harsh nor was the young ladies emotional reason recognised. 14 years is a very young age to lose a grand parent. A bit of empathy should have been applied with a dash of common sense. Tanyawhitney@btinternet.com

1:39pm Fri 20 Dec 13

TRT says...

"Hindsight is a wonderful thing"

How about "foresight"?
"Hindsight is a wonderful thing" How about "foresight"? TRT

2:58pm Fri 20 Dec 13

garston tony says...

Tanyawhitney@btinter
net.com
wrote:
Do you know what, I still don't see your point. Hindsight is a wonderful thing & if the young lady broke the rules twice fair enough that'd warrant some type of punishment. But it's the 1st time she has ever done this. The punishment was way too harsh nor was the young ladies emotional reason recognised. 14 years is a very young age to lose a grand parent. A bit of empathy should have been applied with a dash of common sense.
There was no need for 'hindsight', the parents and I assume child were aware IN ADVANCE that her shaving her head would lead to punishement at school.

I still dont think she should have been punished by missing an exam mind you
[quote][p][bold]Tanyawhitney@btinter net.com[/bold] wrote: Do you know what, I still don't see your point. Hindsight is a wonderful thing & if the young lady broke the rules twice fair enough that'd warrant some type of punishment. But it's the 1st time she has ever done this. The punishment was way too harsh nor was the young ladies emotional reason recognised. 14 years is a very young age to lose a grand parent. A bit of empathy should have been applied with a dash of common sense.[/p][/quote]There was no need for 'hindsight', the parents and I assume child were aware IN ADVANCE that her shaving her head would lead to punishement at school. I still dont think she should have been punished by missing an exam mind you garston tony

3:34pm Fri 20 Dec 13

mummy_1 says...

My 11 year old (Y7) son has just read this article and his comments are as follows:

a. Why didn't her parents speak to the school first?
b. Do this during Summer Holidays?
c. Why are they all surprised that Jade was put in isolation when her dad said he was expecting a 'fall-out'?

My sympathies are with the family, however what next, tattoos, piercing and term time holidays to mark/ commemorate lost loved ones? The school has to have rules. Great cause Jade but rules are rules and even if something is for a good cause 'rules are rules'.

The parents of Bushey Meads kids are spending a lot of effort (and column inches in the WO) displaying a lack of support for the school. May I suggest that many have a read of the school rules over Xmas and any rules that they have an issue with, they contact the School Governors (not the WO) and discuss before it becomes an issue.
My 11 year old (Y7) son has just read this article and his comments are as follows: a. Why didn't her parents speak to the school first? b. Do this during Summer Holidays? c. Why are they all surprised that Jade was put in isolation when her dad said he was expecting a 'fall-out'? My sympathies are with the family, however what next, tattoos, piercing and term time holidays to mark/ commemorate lost loved ones? The school has to have rules. Great cause Jade but rules are rules and even if something is for a good cause 'rules are rules'. The parents of Bushey Meads kids are spending a lot of effort (and column inches in the WO) displaying a lack of support for the school. May I suggest that many have a read of the school rules over Xmas and any rules that they have an issue with, they contact the School Governors (not the WO) and discuss before it becomes an issue. mummy_1

4:29pm Fri 20 Dec 13

Harry's Bar says...

Tanyawhitney@btinter
net.com
wrote:
Do you know what, I still don't see your point. Hindsight is a wonderful thing & if the young lady broke the rules twice fair enough that'd warrant some type of punishment. But it's the 1st time she has ever done this. The punishment was way too harsh nor was the young ladies emotional reason recognised. 14 years is a very young age to lose a grand parent. A bit of empathy should have been applied with a dash of common sense.
14 years is a very young age to shave all your hair off for charity. There should be charity guidelines for an appropriate minimum age to do this.
[quote][p][bold]Tanyawhitney@btinter net.com[/bold] wrote: Do you know what, I still don't see your point. Hindsight is a wonderful thing & if the young lady broke the rules twice fair enough that'd warrant some type of punishment. But it's the 1st time she has ever done this. The punishment was way too harsh nor was the young ladies emotional reason recognised. 14 years is a very young age to lose a grand parent. A bit of empathy should have been applied with a dash of common sense.[/p][/quote]14 years is a very young age to shave all your hair off for charity. There should be charity guidelines for an appropriate minimum age to do this. Harry's Bar

4:43pm Fri 20 Dec 13

Boosey says...

A rasta has dreadlocks, if a pupil had dreadlocks, would that be classed as extreme? Doubt it, so what's wrong with a shaven head? Oh I know, maybe it's classed as thuggish!
A rasta has dreadlocks, if a pupil had dreadlocks, would that be classed as extreme? Doubt it, so what's wrong with a shaven head? Oh I know, maybe it's classed as thuggish! Boosey

4:52pm Fri 20 Dec 13

CaptainPC says...

Boosey wrote:
A rasta has dreadlocks, if a pupil had dreadlocks, would that be classed as extreme? Doubt it, so what's wrong with a shaven head? Oh I know, maybe it's classed as thuggish!
That's why it's not allowed in the school.

If you know the rules and break them, then accept the punishment.

There seems to a spate of parents publicising their issues in the press.

Leaving aside the right and wrong of the catual case what benefit is there, to the child. I can't see any at all.......
[quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: A rasta has dreadlocks, if a pupil had dreadlocks, would that be classed as extreme? Doubt it, so what's wrong with a shaven head? Oh I know, maybe it's classed as thuggish![/p][/quote]That's why it's not allowed in the school. If you know the rules and break them, then accept the punishment. There seems to a spate of parents publicising their issues in the press. Leaving aside the right and wrong of the catual case what benefit is there, to the child. I can't see any at all....... CaptainPC

9:39pm Fri 20 Dec 13

esercito giallo says...

CaptainPC wrote:
Boosey wrote:
A rasta has dreadlocks, if a pupil had dreadlocks, would that be classed as extreme? Doubt it, so what's wrong with a shaven head? Oh I know, maybe it's classed as thuggish!
That's why it's not allowed in the school.

If you know the rules and break them, then accept the punishment.

There seems to a spate of parents publicising their issues in the press.

Leaving aside the right and wrong of the catual case what benefit is there, to the child. I can't see any at all.......
Apart from raising money for charity and she can imitate Jessie J who is a good role model for kids !
[quote][p][bold]CaptainPC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: A rasta has dreadlocks, if a pupil had dreadlocks, would that be classed as extreme? Doubt it, so what's wrong with a shaven head? Oh I know, maybe it's classed as thuggish![/p][/quote]That's why it's not allowed in the school. If you know the rules and break them, then accept the punishment. There seems to a spate of parents publicising their issues in the press. Leaving aside the right and wrong of the catual case what benefit is there, to the child. I can't see any at all.......[/p][/quote]Apart from raising money for charity and she can imitate Jessie J who is a good role model for kids ! esercito giallo

12:10pm Sat 21 Dec 13

Boosey says...

CaptainPC wrote:
Boosey wrote: A rasta has dreadlocks, if a pupil had dreadlocks, would that be classed as extreme? Doubt it, so what's wrong with a shaven head? Oh I know, maybe it's classed as thuggish!
That's why it's not allowed in the school. If you know the rules and break them, then accept the punishment. There seems to a spate of parents publicising their issues in the press. Leaving aside the right and wrong of the catual case what benefit is there, to the child. I can't see any at all.......
She won't catch nits for a while, that's at least one benefit.
[quote][p][bold]CaptainPC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: A rasta has dreadlocks, if a pupil had dreadlocks, would that be classed as extreme? Doubt it, so what's wrong with a shaven head? Oh I know, maybe it's classed as thuggish![/p][/quote]That's why it's not allowed in the school. If you know the rules and break them, then accept the punishment. There seems to a spate of parents publicising their issues in the press. Leaving aside the right and wrong of the catual case what benefit is there, to the child. I can't see any at all.......[/p][/quote]She won't catch nits for a while, that's at least one benefit. Boosey

2:02pm Sat 21 Dec 13

Wisbech Hornet says...

grahamtaylorismydad wrote:
beyond belief, the headmaster should hang his head in shame
Why should the head "hang his head in shame"
This father contacted the school, was told there would be consequenses if his daughter had her head shaved so they went ahead and did it anyway and then run to the WO when the punishment is meted out.
This may well have been done for a worthy cause but better to have done it at the start of the summer holidays when her hair would have had 6 weeks to grow back to an acceptable length.
Why do some parents think school rules do not apply to their own children?
[quote][p][bold]grahamtaylorismydad[/bold] wrote: beyond belief, the headmaster should hang his head in shame[/p][/quote]Why should the head "hang his head in shame" This father contacted the school, was told there would be consequenses if his daughter had her head shaved so they went ahead and did it anyway and then run to the WO when the punishment is meted out. This may well have been done for a worthy cause but better to have done it at the start of the summer holidays when her hair would have had 6 weeks to grow back to an acceptable length. Why do some parents think school rules do not apply to their own children? Wisbech Hornet

5:44pm Sat 21 Dec 13

BlackxWidow says...

My daughter shaved her head for charity..BUT firstly she asked her heateacher if this would be ok,she was given the OK and teachers and students alike (with the head at the time giving a very nice sum) all donated and made almost £500 to her chosen charity..Schools have rules regaring the way you look and how you represent the school...Im sorry,but if the head said no,then its no...Maybe think of other ways to raise money..Nothing against Jade or the family,im just telling you about my daughters experience.
Merry Christmas to you all ;d
My daughter shaved her head for charity..BUT firstly she asked her heateacher if this would be ok,she was given the OK and teachers and students alike (with the head at the time giving a very nice sum) all donated and made almost £500 to her chosen charity..Schools have rules regaring the way you look and how you represent the school...Im sorry,but if the head said no,then its no...Maybe think of other ways to raise money..Nothing against Jade or the family,im just telling you about my daughters experience. Merry Christmas to you all ;d BlackxWidow

9:59am Sun 22 Dec 13

Digger14 says...

mummy_1 wrote:
My 11 year old (Y7) son has just read this article and his comments are as follows:

a. Why didn't her parents speak to the school first?
b. Do this during Summer Holidays?
c. Why are they all surprised that Jade was put in isolation when her dad said he was expecting a 'fall-out'?

My sympathies are with the family, however what next, tattoos, piercing and term time holidays to mark/ commemorate lost loved ones? The school has to have rules. Great cause Jade but rules are rules and even if something is for a good cause 'rules are rules'.

The parents of Bushey Meads kids are spending a lot of effort (and column inches in the WO) displaying a lack of support for the school. May I suggest that many have a read of the school rules over Xmas and any rules that they have an issue with, they contact the School Governors (not the WO) and discuss before it becomes an issue.
Parents are using the WO because the school is not prepared to listen to parents concerns. There have been numerous complaints to the headmaster and he Governors about the new unfair uniform policy but these are being shunned by them and we all know why. All this can be seen by checking out the Facebook page Bushey Meads Unifirm Group and on the petition on change.com.
[quote][p][bold]mummy_1[/bold] wrote: My 11 year old (Y7) son has just read this article and his comments are as follows: a. Why didn't her parents speak to the school first? b. Do this during Summer Holidays? c. Why are they all surprised that Jade was put in isolation when her dad said he was expecting a 'fall-out'? My sympathies are with the family, however what next, tattoos, piercing and term time holidays to mark/ commemorate lost loved ones? The school has to have rules. Great cause Jade but rules are rules and even if something is for a good cause 'rules are rules'. The parents of Bushey Meads kids are spending a lot of effort (and column inches in the WO) displaying a lack of support for the school. May I suggest that many have a read of the school rules over Xmas and any rules that they have an issue with, they contact the School Governors (not the WO) and discuss before it becomes an issue.[/p][/quote]Parents are using the WO because the school is not prepared to listen to parents concerns. There have been numerous complaints to the headmaster and he Governors about the new unfair uniform policy but these are being shunned by them and we all know why. All this can be seen by checking out the Facebook page Bushey Meads Unifirm Group and on the petition on change.com. Digger14

1:06pm Sun 22 Dec 13

mummy_1 says...

Digger14 wrote:
mummy_1 wrote:
My 11 year old (Y7) son has just read this article and his comments are as follows:

a. Why didn't her parents speak to the school first?
b. Do this during Summer Holidays?
c. Why are they all surprised that Jade was put in isolation when her dad said he was expecting a 'fall-out'?

My sympathies are with the family, however what next, tattoos, piercing and term time holidays to mark/ commemorate lost loved ones? The school has to have rules. Great cause Jade but rules are rules and even if something is for a good cause 'rules are rules'.

The parents of Bushey Meads kids are spending a lot of effort (and column inches in the WO) displaying a lack of support for the school. May I suggest that many have a read of the school rules over Xmas and any rules that they have an issue with, they contact the School Governors (not the WO) and discuss before it becomes an issue.
Parents are using the WO because the school is not prepared to listen to parents concerns. There have been numerous complaints to the headmaster and he Governors about the new unfair uniform policy but these are being shunned by them and we all know why. All this can be seen by checking out the Facebook page Bushey Meads Unifirm Group and on the petition on change.com.
While I don't foresee many teenaged girls shaving their head for a good cause, dyed hair, tattoos, piecing, term time pilgrimages will all become the new 'head shave' and all have to be managed for the good of the school.

My son's secondary school has many, many issues, which we all complain about to each other as parents and carers. Many use the social media to vent yet when there is an official meeting a hand-full of parents (less than 50) turn up and most tend to be the ones who are supporting the school’s view. If you believe that the case is for the good, use the correct forums and procedures, the school has to listen to what you have to say and respond. A 'Like' on Facebook or a retweet does not get recognition!
[quote][p][bold]Digger14[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mummy_1[/bold] wrote: My 11 year old (Y7) son has just read this article and his comments are as follows: a. Why didn't her parents speak to the school first? b. Do this during Summer Holidays? c. Why are they all surprised that Jade was put in isolation when her dad said he was expecting a 'fall-out'? My sympathies are with the family, however what next, tattoos, piercing and term time holidays to mark/ commemorate lost loved ones? The school has to have rules. Great cause Jade but rules are rules and even if something is for a good cause 'rules are rules'. The parents of Bushey Meads kids are spending a lot of effort (and column inches in the WO) displaying a lack of support for the school. May I suggest that many have a read of the school rules over Xmas and any rules that they have an issue with, they contact the School Governors (not the WO) and discuss before it becomes an issue.[/p][/quote]Parents are using the WO because the school is not prepared to listen to parents concerns. There have been numerous complaints to the headmaster and he Governors about the new unfair uniform policy but these are being shunned by them and we all know why. All this can be seen by checking out the Facebook page Bushey Meads Unifirm Group and on the petition on change.com.[/p][/quote]While I don't foresee many teenaged girls shaving their head for a good cause, dyed hair, tattoos, piecing, term time pilgrimages will all become the new 'head shave' and all have to be managed for the good of the school. My son's secondary school has many, many issues, which we all complain about to each other as parents and carers. Many use the social media to vent yet when there is an official meeting a hand-full of parents (less than 50) turn up and most tend to be the ones who are supporting the school’s view. If you believe that the case is for the good, use the correct forums and procedures, the school has to listen to what you have to say and respond. A 'Like' on Facebook or a retweet does not get recognition! mummy_1

1:19pm Sun 22 Dec 13

LSC says...

Digger14 wrote:
mummy_1 wrote:
My 11 year old (Y7) son has just read this article and his comments are as follows:

a. Why didn't her parents speak to the school first?
b. Do this during Summer Holidays?
c. Why are they all surprised that Jade was put in isolation when her dad said he was expecting a 'fall-out'?

My sympathies are with the family, however what next, tattoos, piercing and term time holidays to mark/ commemorate lost loved ones? The school has to have rules. Great cause Jade but rules are rules and even if something is for a good cause 'rules are rules'.

The parents of Bushey Meads kids are spending a lot of effort (and column inches in the WO) displaying a lack of support for the school. May I suggest that many have a read of the school rules over Xmas and any rules that they have an issue with, they contact the School Governors (not the WO) and discuss before it becomes an issue.
Parents are using the WO because the school is not prepared to listen to parents concerns. There have been numerous complaints to the headmaster and he Governors about the new unfair uniform policy but these are being shunned by them and we all know why. All this can be seen by checking out the Facebook page Bushey Meads Unifirm Group and on the petition on change.com.
The uniform policy is a disgrace, I agree.
As an employer, I do sometimes look into school records/references but believe me, something like wearing the wrong brand of trousers does not influence me. If the pupil had insisted on wearing lime-green flared shorts with pictures of kittens on them, then perhaps.
Which brings us back to the head shaving. Having sensibly checked it was against the rules, they did it anyway. This would worry me as an employer.
If I need someone at work at 9 and they don't turn up until 11 because they were helping old ladies across the road, that is all very commendable but is no good to me. It would be against the rules, but they did it anyway. There is a time and place and a method for charity.
[quote][p][bold]Digger14[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mummy_1[/bold] wrote: My 11 year old (Y7) son has just read this article and his comments are as follows: a. Why didn't her parents speak to the school first? b. Do this during Summer Holidays? c. Why are they all surprised that Jade was put in isolation when her dad said he was expecting a 'fall-out'? My sympathies are with the family, however what next, tattoos, piercing and term time holidays to mark/ commemorate lost loved ones? The school has to have rules. Great cause Jade but rules are rules and even if something is for a good cause 'rules are rules'. The parents of Bushey Meads kids are spending a lot of effort (and column inches in the WO) displaying a lack of support for the school. May I suggest that many have a read of the school rules over Xmas and any rules that they have an issue with, they contact the School Governors (not the WO) and discuss before it becomes an issue.[/p][/quote]Parents are using the WO because the school is not prepared to listen to parents concerns. There have been numerous complaints to the headmaster and he Governors about the new unfair uniform policy but these are being shunned by them and we all know why. All this can be seen by checking out the Facebook page Bushey Meads Unifirm Group and on the petition on change.com.[/p][/quote]The uniform policy is a disgrace, I agree. As an employer, I do sometimes look into school records/references but believe me, something like wearing the wrong brand of trousers does not influence me. If the pupil had insisted on wearing lime-green flared shorts with pictures of kittens on them, then perhaps. Which brings us back to the head shaving. Having sensibly checked it was against the rules, they did it anyway. This would worry me as an employer. If I need someone at work at 9 and they don't turn up until 11 because they were helping old ladies across the road, that is all very commendable but is no good to me. It would be against the rules, but they did it anyway. There is a time and place and a method for charity. LSC

11:17am Mon 23 Dec 13

CaptainPC says...

Boosey wrote:
CaptainPC wrote:
Boosey wrote: A rasta has dreadlocks, if a pupil had dreadlocks, would that be classed as extreme? Doubt it, so what's wrong with a shaven head? Oh I know, maybe it's classed as thuggish!
That's why it's not allowed in the school. If you know the rules and break them, then accept the punishment. There seems to a spate of parents publicising their issues in the press. Leaving aside the right and wrong of the catual case what benefit is there, to the child. I can't see any at all.......
She won't catch nits for a while, that's at least one benefit.
You aren't the brightest are you?
I was questioning the benefit of publicising the problem.
[quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]CaptainPC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: A rasta has dreadlocks, if a pupil had dreadlocks, would that be classed as extreme? Doubt it, so what's wrong with a shaven head? Oh I know, maybe it's classed as thuggish![/p][/quote]That's why it's not allowed in the school. If you know the rules and break them, then accept the punishment. There seems to a spate of parents publicising their issues in the press. Leaving aside the right and wrong of the catual case what benefit is there, to the child. I can't see any at all.......[/p][/quote]She won't catch nits for a while, that's at least one benefit.[/p][/quote]You aren't the brightest are you? I was questioning the benefit of publicising the problem. CaptainPC

1:23pm Mon 23 Dec 13

Boosey says...

CaptainPC wrote:
Boosey wrote:
CaptainPC wrote:
Boosey wrote: A rasta has dreadlocks, if a pupil had dreadlocks, would that be classed as extreme? Doubt it, so what's wrong with a shaven head? Oh I know, maybe it's classed as thuggish!
That's why it's not allowed in the school. If you know the rules and break them, then accept the punishment. There seems to a spate of parents publicising their issues in the press. Leaving aside the right and wrong of the catual case what benefit is there, to the child. I can't see any at all.......
She won't catch nits for a while, that's at least one benefit.
You aren't the brightest are you? I was questioning the benefit of publicising the problem.
Captain Condom speaks again! The difference between you and I is, I don't take myself seriously, you're pathetic, go do one knobhead!
[quote][p][bold]CaptainPC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]CaptainPC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: A rasta has dreadlocks, if a pupil had dreadlocks, would that be classed as extreme? Doubt it, so what's wrong with a shaven head? Oh I know, maybe it's classed as thuggish![/p][/quote]That's why it's not allowed in the school. If you know the rules and break them, then accept the punishment. There seems to a spate of parents publicising their issues in the press. Leaving aside the right and wrong of the catual case what benefit is there, to the child. I can't see any at all.......[/p][/quote]She won't catch nits for a while, that's at least one benefit.[/p][/quote]You aren't the brightest are you? I was questioning the benefit of publicising the problem.[/p][/quote]Captain Condom speaks again! The difference between you and I is, I don't take myself seriously, you're pathetic, go do one knobhead! Boosey

1:24pm Mon 23 Dec 13

CaptainPC says...

Boosey wrote:
CaptainPC wrote:
Boosey wrote:
CaptainPC wrote:
Boosey wrote: A rasta has dreadlocks, if a pupil had dreadlocks, would that be classed as extreme? Doubt it, so what's wrong with a shaven head? Oh I know, maybe it's classed as thuggish!
That's why it's not allowed in the school. If you know the rules and break them, then accept the punishment. There seems to a spate of parents publicising their issues in the press. Leaving aside the right and wrong of the catual case what benefit is there, to the child. I can't see any at all.......
She won't catch nits for a while, that's at least one benefit.
You aren't the brightest are you? I was questioning the benefit of publicising the problem.
Captain Condom speaks again! The difference between you and I is, I don't take myself seriously, you're pathetic, go do one knobhead!
You are right not to take yourself seriously.
[quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]CaptainPC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]CaptainPC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: A rasta has dreadlocks, if a pupil had dreadlocks, would that be classed as extreme? Doubt it, so what's wrong with a shaven head? Oh I know, maybe it's classed as thuggish![/p][/quote]That's why it's not allowed in the school. If you know the rules and break them, then accept the punishment. There seems to a spate of parents publicising their issues in the press. Leaving aside the right and wrong of the catual case what benefit is there, to the child. I can't see any at all.......[/p][/quote]She won't catch nits for a while, that's at least one benefit.[/p][/quote]You aren't the brightest are you? I was questioning the benefit of publicising the problem.[/p][/quote]Captain Condom speaks again! The difference between you and I is, I don't take myself seriously, you're pathetic, go do one knobhead![/p][/quote]You are right not to take yourself seriously. CaptainPC

1:36pm Mon 23 Dec 13

lutondown says...

CaptainPC wrote:
Boosey wrote:
CaptainPC wrote:
Boosey wrote:
CaptainPC wrote:
Boosey wrote: A rasta has dreadlocks, if a pupil had dreadlocks, would that be classed as extreme? Doubt it, so what's wrong with a shaven head? Oh I know, maybe it's classed as thuggish!
That's why it's not allowed in the school. If you know the rules and break them, then accept the punishment. There seems to a spate of parents publicising their issues in the press. Leaving aside the right and wrong of the catual case what benefit is there, to the child. I can't see any at all.......
She won't catch nits for a while, that's at least one benefit.
You aren't the brightest are you? I was questioning the benefit of publicising the problem.
Captain Condom speaks again! The difference between you and I is, I don't take myself seriously, you're pathetic, go do one knobhead!
You are right not to take yourself seriously.
Oh dear captain...intellectu
al snobbery at its very worst.
You obviously see yourself as one bright mother..
Clever clever boy you
[quote][p][bold]CaptainPC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]CaptainPC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]CaptainPC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: A rasta has dreadlocks, if a pupil had dreadlocks, would that be classed as extreme? Doubt it, so what's wrong with a shaven head? Oh I know, maybe it's classed as thuggish![/p][/quote]That's why it's not allowed in the school. If you know the rules and break them, then accept the punishment. There seems to a spate of parents publicising their issues in the press. Leaving aside the right and wrong of the catual case what benefit is there, to the child. I can't see any at all.......[/p][/quote]She won't catch nits for a while, that's at least one benefit.[/p][/quote]You aren't the brightest are you? I was questioning the benefit of publicising the problem.[/p][/quote]Captain Condom speaks again! The difference between you and I is, I don't take myself seriously, you're pathetic, go do one knobhead![/p][/quote]You are right not to take yourself seriously.[/p][/quote]Oh dear captain...intellectu al snobbery at its very worst. You obviously see yourself as one bright mother.. Clever clever boy you lutondown

1:50pm Mon 23 Dec 13

Boosey says...

CaptainPC wrote:
Boosey wrote:
CaptainPC wrote:
Boosey wrote:
CaptainPC wrote:
Boosey wrote: A rasta has dreadlocks, if a pupil had dreadlocks, would that be classed as extreme? Doubt it, so what's wrong with a shaven head? Oh I know, maybe it's classed as thuggish!
That's why it's not allowed in the school. If you know the rules and break them, then accept the punishment. There seems to a spate of parents publicising their issues in the press. Leaving aside the right and wrong of the catual case what benefit is there, to the child. I can't see any at all.......
She won't catch nits for a while, that's at least one benefit.
You aren't the brightest are you? I was questioning the benefit of publicising the problem.
Captain Condom speaks again! The difference between you and I is, I don't take myself seriously, you're pathetic, go do one knobhead!
You are right not to take yourself seriously.
Here's a question for everyone.
How does Captain Condom make friends?
No, seriously, he's getting lonely!
[quote][p][bold]CaptainPC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]CaptainPC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]CaptainPC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: A rasta has dreadlocks, if a pupil had dreadlocks, would that be classed as extreme? Doubt it, so what's wrong with a shaven head? Oh I know, maybe it's classed as thuggish![/p][/quote]That's why it's not allowed in the school. If you know the rules and break them, then accept the punishment. There seems to a spate of parents publicising their issues in the press. Leaving aside the right and wrong of the catual case what benefit is there, to the child. I can't see any at all.......[/p][/quote]She won't catch nits for a while, that's at least one benefit.[/p][/quote]You aren't the brightest are you? I was questioning the benefit of publicising the problem.[/p][/quote]Captain Condom speaks again! The difference between you and I is, I don't take myself seriously, you're pathetic, go do one knobhead![/p][/quote]You are right not to take yourself seriously.[/p][/quote]Here's a question for everyone. How does Captain Condom make friends? No, seriously, he's getting lonely! Boosey

2:07pm Mon 23 Dec 13

CaptainPC says...

Boosey wrote:
CaptainPC wrote:
Boosey wrote:
CaptainPC wrote:
Boosey wrote:
CaptainPC wrote:
Boosey wrote: A rasta has dreadlocks, if a pupil had dreadlocks, would that be classed as extreme? Doubt it, so what's wrong with a shaven head? Oh I know, maybe it's classed as thuggish!
That's why it's not allowed in the school. If you know the rules and break them, then accept the punishment. There seems to a spate of parents publicising their issues in the press. Leaving aside the right and wrong of the catual case what benefit is there, to the child. I can't see any at all.......
She won't catch nits for a while, that's at least one benefit.
You aren't the brightest are you? I was questioning the benefit of publicising the problem.
Captain Condom speaks again! The difference between you and I is, I don't take myself seriously, you're pathetic, go do one knobhead!
You are right not to take yourself seriously.
Here's a question for everyone.
How does Captain Condom make friends?
No, seriously, he's getting lonely!
I appreciate your concern and I think it is sweet that your "Goodwill to all men" attitude overcomes our petty bickering, but I'm fine for friends, thanks.

Hope you have a lovely Christmas, mate. X
[quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]CaptainPC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]CaptainPC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]CaptainPC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: A rasta has dreadlocks, if a pupil had dreadlocks, would that be classed as extreme? Doubt it, so what's wrong with a shaven head? Oh I know, maybe it's classed as thuggish![/p][/quote]That's why it's not allowed in the school. If you know the rules and break them, then accept the punishment. There seems to a spate of parents publicising their issues in the press. Leaving aside the right and wrong of the catual case what benefit is there, to the child. I can't see any at all.......[/p][/quote]She won't catch nits for a while, that's at least one benefit.[/p][/quote]You aren't the brightest are you? I was questioning the benefit of publicising the problem.[/p][/quote]Captain Condom speaks again! The difference between you and I is, I don't take myself seriously, you're pathetic, go do one knobhead![/p][/quote]You are right not to take yourself seriously.[/p][/quote]Here's a question for everyone. How does Captain Condom make friends? No, seriously, he's getting lonely![/p][/quote]I appreciate your concern and I think it is sweet that your "Goodwill to all men" attitude overcomes our petty bickering, but I'm fine for friends, thanks. Hope you have a lovely Christmas, mate. X CaptainPC

11:18am Tue 24 Dec 13

gloryhornet4 says...

The school is right to be miffed BUT never ever stop a child from sitting an exam.
The school is right to be miffed BUT never ever stop a child from sitting an exam. gloryhornet4

12:59pm Sun 29 Dec 13

Paul Barbara says...

XxMaseyxX wrote:
I'm sorry but I think a lot of people are missing the point. THIS WAS FOR CHARITY! ! Surely the school should have been a lot more supportive. I'm slightly biased at the minute probably having lost my mum to cancer only a few weeks ago. This disease is horrendous not only for the person suffering, but for the people caring for them. The more money raised to help in the research of cancer and eventually a cure can only be a good thing and anyone prepared to go to any lengths to assist in this can only be commended in my eyes. If this beautiful young lady did something to aid many others why should she be punished in any way? Hairstyles do not affect the capabilities to learn, nor are they detrimental to others. I think the school needs to make an apology to this young star and also to those of us that have taken massive offence to her treatment. I'm so upset and angry that for someone that has stuck to their principles, and done such a good dead, for a massively good cause can be treated so appallingly. Mrs S Mason - South Oxhey
Spot on, Mrs. Mason! The Soviets used to have 'rules', too: like children obliged to report on their parents. I'm sure the Hitler Youth had rules too.
I wonder how many of the 'teachers' belong to 'Common Purpose' and go along with 'Agenda 21' re education?
That schools have to have rules is fine, but here was a case where any one with an ounce of common sense or decency would have happily granted a 'dispensation' due to the reason for the head-shave.
I lost a sister in America a couple of years ago to cancer - a truly good, loving mother of three, grandmother of one, and only 56 years old.
She had survived a mastectomy for breast cancer, and seemed to be cancer free. She was used in the hospital literature as an example of a brilliant result for their work. But the cancer returned, in her brain, and all the medical interventions failed to save her.
But here is the really important thing I have to tell all who have eyes to see and ears to hear: our UK Government, and other Governments, and the WHO, don't give diddly squat about how many people get cancer - in fact the Governments actively promote KNOWN cancer-causing WI-FI (especially in schools!) and microwave (mobile phones, 'Smart' phones and 'Smart' meters (search '973 - Barrie Trower (1 of 13)' for an excellent 13-part video exposing this).
It is an extremely illuminating video, and Barrie has other very good videos and documents on the web.
Learn how our Government shower (and all the main parties are the same on microwaves) have foisted a system called 'Tetra' on our emergency services, including police and ambulancemen, which is KNOWN to be horrendously dangerous; they have committed to 'Trial' this US (Motorola) system till 2018, and any officer who doesn't like it has is told 'Accept it or resign'. They are using these officers as guinea pigs, a breach of the Nuremberg principles. They are doing the same with our children, often forcing them to sit in front of WI-FI computers, where the young girl's eggs are irradiated; these eggs have no defense against irradiation, and this will undoughtedly cause untold damage through the generations. Microwave damage can never be repaired.
I hope any parents, and any Emergency personnel, research this issue.
[quote][p][bold]XxMaseyxX[/bold] wrote: I'm sorry but I think a lot of people are missing the point. THIS WAS FOR CHARITY! ! Surely the school should have been a lot more supportive. I'm slightly biased at the minute probably having lost my mum to cancer only a few weeks ago. This disease is horrendous not only for the person suffering, but for the people caring for them. The more money raised to help in the research of cancer and eventually a cure can only be a good thing and anyone prepared to go to any lengths to assist in this can only be commended in my eyes. If this beautiful young lady did something to aid many others why should she be punished in any way? Hairstyles do not affect the capabilities to learn, nor are they detrimental to others. I think the school needs to make an apology to this young star and also to those of us that have taken massive offence to her treatment. I'm so upset and angry that for someone that has stuck to their principles, and done such a good dead, for a massively good cause can be treated so appallingly. Mrs S Mason - South Oxhey[/p][/quote]Spot on, Mrs. Mason! The Soviets used to have 'rules', too: like children obliged to report on their parents. I'm sure the Hitler Youth had rules too. I wonder how many of the 'teachers' belong to 'Common Purpose' and go along with 'Agenda 21' re education? That schools have to have rules is fine, but here was a case where any one with an ounce of common sense or decency would have happily granted a 'dispensation' due to the reason for the head-shave. I lost a sister in America a couple of years ago to cancer - a truly good, loving mother of three, grandmother of one, and only 56 years old. She had survived a mastectomy for breast cancer, and seemed to be cancer free. She was used in the hospital literature as an example of a brilliant result for their work. But the cancer returned, in her brain, and all the medical interventions failed to save her. But here is the really important thing I have to tell all who have eyes to see and ears to hear: our UK Government, and other Governments, and the WHO, don't give diddly squat about how many people get cancer - in fact the Governments actively promote KNOWN cancer-causing WI-FI (especially in schools!) and microwave (mobile phones, 'Smart' phones and 'Smart' meters (search '973 - Barrie Trower (1 of 13)' for an excellent 13-part video exposing this). It is an extremely illuminating video, and Barrie has other very good videos and documents on the web. Learn how our Government shower (and all the main parties are the same on microwaves) have foisted a system called 'Tetra' on our emergency services, including police and ambulancemen, which is KNOWN to be horrendously dangerous; they have committed to 'Trial' this US (Motorola) system till 2018, and any officer who doesn't like it has is told 'Accept it or resign'. They are using these officers as guinea pigs, a breach of the Nuremberg principles. They are doing the same with our children, often forcing them to sit in front of WI-FI computers, where the young girl's eggs are irradiated; these eggs have no defense against irradiation, and this will undoughtedly cause untold damage through the generations. Microwave damage can never be repaired. I hope any parents, and any Emergency personnel, research this issue. Paul Barbara

6:42pm Sun 29 Dec 13

Paul Barbara says...

I forgot to add, before she died, I had my head shaved in a show of solidarity; a very minor act, and in no way comparable to the young girl's shave for charity; also, it is a much bigger gesture for a girl to lose her haie than it is for an OAP like myself.
I am heartened by the result of the poll at top of page; it shows that at least on this issue, WO readers have overwhelmingly shown humane and sensible attitudes. I only hope this can be reflected if the school head is in need of votes at some time (I don't know how the system works, but that school system certainly lacks common sense and decency. Shame on them. They ought to shave their heads, and go about in sackcloth and ashes as a penance.
I forgot to add, before she died, I had my head shaved in a show of solidarity; a very minor act, and in no way comparable to the young girl's shave for charity; also, it is a much bigger gesture for a girl to lose her haie than it is for an OAP like myself. I am heartened by the result of the poll at top of page; it shows that at least on this issue, WO readers have overwhelmingly shown humane and sensible attitudes. I only hope this can be reflected if the school head is in need of votes at some time (I don't know how the system works, but that school system certainly lacks common sense and decency. Shame on them. They ought to shave their heads, and go about in sackcloth and ashes as a penance. Paul Barbara

9:13pm Wed 1 Jan 14

tizbyjo.1989 says...

What if a young girl was going through cancer treatment, was told that she MAY lose her hair and shave it off??? Would she be told she cant sit an exam??? Jade has done this for CHARITY. How many other girls of Jades age have sat down and thought about doing something themselves to help others and have actually done it?? I know of a few people local to us who have done this and there has been nothing said to them about 'cult haircuts' and being isolated or excluded or told they cant sit an exam!!
This headteacher and school should be ashamed of themselves. No heart obviously to support a CHILD who has gone out and raised money for a great cause!!
Well Done Jade!!! Keep fundraising and fighting these morons!! x
What if a young girl was going through cancer treatment, was told that she MAY lose her hair and shave it off??? Would she be told she cant sit an exam??? Jade has done this for CHARITY. How many other girls of Jades age have sat down and thought about doing something themselves to help others and have actually done it?? I know of a few people local to us who have done this and there has been nothing said to them about 'cult haircuts' and being isolated or excluded or told they cant sit an exam!! This headteacher and school should be ashamed of themselves. No heart obviously to support a CHILD who has gone out and raised money for a great cause!! Well Done Jade!!! Keep fundraising and fighting these morons!! x tizbyjo.1989

12:10pm Thu 2 Jan 14

Paul Barbara says...

I see my first post got two 'dislikes'. Yet no replies! Why, cat got your typing fingers, or you cannot dispute the microwave claims?
Presumably neither of you have school-age children or grand-children, and don't care how much other people's children are exposed to these dangers in schools.
I see my first post got two 'dislikes'. Yet no replies! Why, cat got your typing fingers, or you cannot dispute the microwave claims? Presumably neither of you have school-age children or grand-children, and don't care how much other people's children are exposed to these dangers in schools. Paul Barbara

2:39pm Thu 2 Jan 14

CaptainPC says...

Paul Barbara wrote:
I see my first post got two 'dislikes'. Yet no replies! Why, cat got your typing fingers, or you cannot dispute the microwave claims?
Presumably neither of you have school-age children or grand-children, and don't care how much other people's children are exposed to these dangers in schools.
I didn't *dislike* your post, but I think the motivation would have been that you are a nutter beyond reason. X
[quote][p][bold]Paul Barbara[/bold] wrote: I see my first post got two 'dislikes'. Yet no replies! Why, cat got your typing fingers, or you cannot dispute the microwave claims? Presumably neither of you have school-age children or grand-children, and don't care how much other people's children are exposed to these dangers in schools.[/p][/quote]I didn't *dislike* your post, but I think the motivation would have been that you are a nutter beyond reason. X CaptainPC

1:50pm Fri 3 Jan 14

pr76uk says...

And at least she gets a chance to take the GCSE's again next year, in Year 11.
And at least she gets a chance to take the GCSE's again next year, in Year 11. pr76uk

4:08am Sat 4 Jan 14

Paul Barbara says...

CaptainPC wrote:
Paul Barbara wrote:
I see my first post got two 'dislikes'. Yet no replies! Why, cat got your typing fingers, or you cannot dispute the microwave claims?
Presumably neither of you have school-age children or grand-children, and don't care how much other people's children are exposed to these dangers in schools.
I didn't *dislike* your post, but I think the motivation would have been that you are a nutter beyond reason. X
Keep taking your meds! I have little doubt you haven't checked out any of the info I gave above; have another glass of Government Kool-Aid!
Someone has to believe their propaganda, might as well be you.
[quote][p][bold]CaptainPC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Paul Barbara[/bold] wrote: I see my first post got two 'dislikes'. Yet no replies! Why, cat got your typing fingers, or you cannot dispute the microwave claims? Presumably neither of you have school-age children or grand-children, and don't care how much other people's children are exposed to these dangers in schools.[/p][/quote]I didn't *dislike* your post, but I think the motivation would have been that you are a nutter beyond reason. X[/p][/quote]Keep taking your meds! I have little doubt you haven't checked out any of the info I gave above; have another glass of Government Kool-Aid! Someone has to believe their propaganda, might as well be you. Paul Barbara

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