Letter: Humbug! How not to treat a child at Christmas PC World

Letter to the Editor: Last month we bought an HP PC for our 13-year-old son, Nick.

It was an expensive gift but one we hoped would last him for a good many years.

On Xmas day he was delighted with the gift and couldn't wait to set it up.

My partner and my son successfully set the PC up and my son downloaded a game.

This was all fine but we were due at my mum's for lunch so Nick never got to use the PC.

Upon arriving home, when my son signed in, a message came up saying "PC repairing itself"' then an "Unable to repair" message.

My partner could do nothing to rectify it so they both packed it up, got up early this morning and were at PC World for their 8am opening.

We had the receipt and all the necessary paperwork and packaging so my husband was expecting a straight exchange. No!

After attempting to reason with them and negotiate, they were unwilling to do anything except send it off to attempt to repair it and it will be gone until at least January 8. They would not budge!

My son has come home in tears, his brand new Xmas present is sitting in PC World and there is nothing anyone is prepared to do about it.

How can it be acceptable to offer only to repair a brand new £550 PC that a child hasn't even been able to use yet? All we asked for was a straight swap.

How can a company do this to a child at Christmas? And, as it was such an expensive gift, we were unable to buy Nick anything else so he now has no Xmas gifts at all.

Sid Radia and Sarah Daly, Souldern Street, Watford

Comments (51)

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10:50am Thu 26 Dec 13

WD18Firm says...

Really poor from PC World.

They are wrong. if the product is faulty (which it clearly is) - you can reject it and demand a full refund.

As a minimum, an exchange should have been offered.
Really poor from PC World. They are wrong. if the product is faulty (which it clearly is) - you can reject it and demand a full refund. As a minimum, an exchange should have been offered. WD18Firm

10:55am Thu 26 Dec 13

gusgreen says...

Sale of goods act Shop is legally responsible for anything they sell and as this unit was "not fit for use" they have to refund the money or exchange which ever the customer wants. Go back and demand your rights and create a row in the shop in front of customers with the manager. Be very firm and insistent but not rude and get what the law says you are entitled to. Good luck!
Sale of goods act Shop is legally responsible for anything they sell and as this unit was "not fit for use" they have to refund the money or exchange which ever the customer wants. Go back and demand your rights and create a row in the shop in front of customers with the manager. Be very firm and insistent but not rude and get what the law says you are entitled to. Good luck! gusgreen

11:09am Thu 26 Dec 13

dontknowynot says...

very bad customer service, maybe you could DEMAND your money back as from what you say clearly the goods as supplied were not fit for purpose. Then buy a replacement elsewhere, any money saved could be given to a charity for the homeless or some such, or of course spent on hedonistic consumption
very bad customer service, maybe you could DEMAND your money back as from what you say clearly the goods as supplied were not fit for purpose. Then buy a replacement elsewhere, any money saved could be given to a charity for the homeless or some such, or of course spent on hedonistic consumption dontknowynot

11:21am Thu 26 Dec 13

Mister Mr says...

Watford Observer, this is not news yet. As a good local paper why not contact PC World for their statement and then build a great news piece from it which is unbiased?

Why has the reader contacted the local paper before phoning PC World Head Office?

Do you advise all readers to contact you in the first instance if we receive poor service on the High Street?

From previous experience most retailers do not even consider refunds/repairs on Boxing Day due to how busy the day is for them, so to actually even have the conversation is fairly fortunate.

There is likely to be three bigger news stories in Watford today, this is not any of them. Those three are likely to be; Watford V Millwall, the new heightened profile of the Harlequin Centre on the business shopping day of the year and the historic traffic problems that the two previous bring with them.

However, all of my comment is irrelevant if the Editor of the Watford Observer does actually work for PC World.
Watford Observer, this is not news yet. As a good local paper why not contact PC World for their statement and then build a great news piece from it which is unbiased? Why has the reader contacted the local paper before phoning PC World Head Office? Do you advise all readers to contact you in the first instance if we receive poor service on the High Street? From previous experience most retailers do not even consider refunds/repairs on Boxing Day due to how busy the day is for them, so to actually even have the conversation is fairly fortunate. There is likely to be three bigger news stories in Watford today, this is not any of them. Those three are likely to be; Watford V Millwall, the new heightened profile of the Harlequin Centre on the business shopping day of the year and the historic traffic problems that the two previous bring with them. However, all of my comment is irrelevant if the Editor of the Watford Observer does actually work for PC World. Mister Mr

11:40am Thu 26 Dec 13

smalon says...

If you have bought that PC with the intention of your son being able to play games on it as well as use it for general purposes, I suggest that you try to get your money back and buy a PC from an online retailer that specialises in gaming PCs.
What you get at Currys/ PC World is woefully under-powered to play modern games on, and I'm talking their high-end systems so your £550 PC stands no chance.
Their are plenty of sites you could get a good system from for your £550 such as Cyberpower, Wired2fire, PCspecialist, Dinopc and many more.
If you have bought that PC with the intention of your son being able to play games on it as well as use it for general purposes, I suggest that you try to get your money back and buy a PC from an online retailer that specialises in gaming PCs. What you get at Currys/ PC World is woefully under-powered to play modern games on, and I'm talking their high-end systems so your £550 PC stands no chance. Their are plenty of sites you could get a good system from for your £550 such as Cyberpower, Wired2fire, PCspecialist, Dinopc and many more. smalon

11:44am Thu 26 Dec 13

LSC says...

I don't believe the law says they HAVE to give you an exchange or refund at this point, but it is pretty stupid for them not to do so.
Many shops operate what is called a 'Good will policy'* for such cases. It might be worth asking if they have one.

*Good will policies are the ones that let you buy an outfit for a party, wear it then take it back and say it didn't fit or the colour looked wrong in sunlight. The law does not support you doing this, but many shops allow it.
Under the letter of the Law, PC World will have to check the claims are correct before you can play the 'unfit for purpose' card. How do they know you didn't pour a cup of tea over the thing, and won't do so again to the next one? Perhaps the downloaded game was corrupt? Is that their fault?

I'm sorry you had a bad experience, but you have to see both sides.
I don't believe the law says they HAVE to give you an exchange or refund at this point, but it is pretty stupid for them not to do so. Many shops operate what is called a 'Good will policy'* for such cases. It might be worth asking if they have one. *Good will policies are the ones that let you buy an outfit for a party, wear it then take it back and say it didn't fit or the colour looked wrong in sunlight. The law does not support you doing this, but many shops allow it. Under the letter of the Law, PC World will have to check the claims are correct before you can play the 'unfit for purpose' card. How do they know you didn't pour a cup of tea over the thing, and won't do so again to the next one? Perhaps the downloaded game was corrupt? Is that their fault? I'm sorry you had a bad experience, but you have to see both sides. LSC

11:54am Thu 26 Dec 13

The Rover says...

LSC wrote:
I don't believe the law says they HAVE to give you an exchange or refund at this point, but it is pretty stupid for them not to do so.
Many shops operate what is called a 'Good will policy'* for such cases. It might be worth asking if they have one.

*Good will policies are the ones that let you buy an outfit for a party, wear it then take it back and say it didn't fit or the colour looked wrong in sunlight. The law does not support you doing this, but many shops allow it.
Under the letter of the Law, PC World will have to check the claims are correct before you can play the 'unfit for purpose' card. How do they know you didn't pour a cup of tea over the thing, and won't do so again to the next one? Perhaps the downloaded game was corrupt? Is that their fault?

I'm sorry you had a bad experience, but you have to see both sides.
The "goodwill policy" is there for people who have changed their minds, or been given a gift they want to exchange. In this case the goods are faulty, not of merchantable quality, and the purchaser is entitled to a full refund.

Do not accept a repair. Insist on a replacement unit, and if they decline this then demand a refund. You are entitled to it. If they refuse to refund you and you paid by credit card then contact your card issuer and get the transaction reversed.

As others have said PC World is not the right place to purchase a gaming PC.
[quote][p][bold]LSC[/bold] wrote: I don't believe the law says they HAVE to give you an exchange or refund at this point, but it is pretty stupid for them not to do so. Many shops operate what is called a 'Good will policy'* for such cases. It might be worth asking if they have one. *Good will policies are the ones that let you buy an outfit for a party, wear it then take it back and say it didn't fit or the colour looked wrong in sunlight. The law does not support you doing this, but many shops allow it. Under the letter of the Law, PC World will have to check the claims are correct before you can play the 'unfit for purpose' card. How do they know you didn't pour a cup of tea over the thing, and won't do so again to the next one? Perhaps the downloaded game was corrupt? Is that their fault? I'm sorry you had a bad experience, but you have to see both sides.[/p][/quote]The "goodwill policy" is there for people who have changed their minds, or been given a gift they want to exchange. In this case the goods are faulty, not of merchantable quality, and the purchaser is entitled to a full refund. Do not accept a repair. Insist on a replacement unit, and if they decline this then demand a refund. You are entitled to it. If they refuse to refund you and you paid by credit card then contact your card issuer and get the transaction reversed. As others have said PC World is not the right place to purchase a gaming PC. The Rover

12:11pm Thu 26 Dec 13

LSC says...

@ The Rover: I think the shop are within their rights to verify there is a fault at all, and then check is wasn't self inflicted, ie tea spillage or corrupt software.
In an ideal world they would have done that right away, but that isn't always possible.
If you bought a Rolls Royce, drove it off the forecourt to a garage and filled it full of Diesel when it has a petrol engine, would you expect a full refund before the facts had been established?

The report says the customer downloaded a game. If that game was corrupt with a virus, how is that PC Worlds fault? Quite obviously the PC was working before or they wouldn't have been able to download the game, would they? They got as far as switching on ok, connecting to the internet ok, so the thing was clearly working.
I think PC World has every right to investigate. It is a shame it couldn't be done faster though.
@ The Rover: I think the shop are within their rights to verify there is a fault at all, and then check is wasn't self inflicted, ie tea spillage or corrupt software. In an ideal world they would have done that right away, but that isn't always possible. If you bought a Rolls Royce, drove it off the forecourt to a garage and filled it full of Diesel when it has a petrol engine, would you expect a full refund before the facts had been established? The report says the customer downloaded a game. If that game was corrupt with a virus, how is that PC Worlds fault? Quite obviously the PC was working before or they wouldn't have been able to download the game, would they? They got as far as switching on ok, connecting to the internet ok, so the thing was clearly working. I think PC World has every right to investigate. It is a shame it couldn't be done faster though. LSC

12:28pm Thu 26 Dec 13

wd40 says...

What if the PC is not faulty but there is a problem with the operating system would it be Microsofts problem? What if the game that was downloaded caused a problem with the operating system is it their fault? Has it been contaminated? Although unfortunate and disappointing I think its unfair to blame a retailer when the cause of the issue needs to be investigated. If they replaced every PC that did not operate the way it was expected to because of problem software in the first instance they would be out of business very quickly. Give them the opportunity to find out what the problem is and then resolve it. What was the game BTW was it compatible with the hardware and operating system was it from a reputable site. I feel sorry for your son and hope he gets it back soon in a working state.
What if the PC is not faulty but there is a problem with the operating system would it be Microsofts problem? What if the game that was downloaded caused a problem with the operating system is it their fault? Has it been contaminated? Although unfortunate and disappointing I think its unfair to blame a retailer when the cause of the issue needs to be investigated. If they replaced every PC that did not operate the way it was expected to because of problem software in the first instance they would be out of business very quickly. Give them the opportunity to find out what the problem is and then resolve it. What was the game BTW was it compatible with the hardware and operating system was it from a reputable site. I feel sorry for your son and hope he gets it back soon in a working state. wd40

12:46pm Thu 26 Dec 13

The Rover says...

LSC wrote:
@ The Rover: I think the shop are within their rights to verify there is a fault at all, and then check is wasn't self inflicted, ie tea spillage or corrupt software.
In an ideal world they would have done that right away, but that isn't always possible.
If you bought a Rolls Royce, drove it off the forecourt to a garage and filled it full of Diesel when it has a petrol engine, would you expect a full refund before the facts had been established?

The report says the customer downloaded a game. If that game was corrupt with a virus, how is that PC Worlds fault? Quite obviously the PC was working before or they wouldn't have been able to download the game, would they? They got as far as switching on ok, connecting to the internet ok, so the thing was clearly working.
I think PC World has every right to investigate. It is a shame it couldn't be done faster though.
I agree, but not if it is going to take the until the 8th January. Being an IT reseller they should have the ability to carry out those checks in store and on the spot. If they know what they are doing it will take them less than 10 minutes to establish if the equipment is faulty. All HP PC's have a recovery partition. Hold down a function key on booting and restore the machine to factory settings. If that doesn't work then the chances are the PC is faulty. Either way the customer should be able to leave the store with a working PC. There are plenty of independent PC resellers, including some in Watford who know how to build a gaming PC, and actually have the knowledge to resolve a problem when things go wrong. You also get personal service from staff who appreciate that a child wants to be able to play with their Christmas present and not wait 10 days.
[quote][p][bold]LSC[/bold] wrote: @ The Rover: I think the shop are within their rights to verify there is a fault at all, and then check is wasn't self inflicted, ie tea spillage or corrupt software. In an ideal world they would have done that right away, but that isn't always possible. If you bought a Rolls Royce, drove it off the forecourt to a garage and filled it full of Diesel when it has a petrol engine, would you expect a full refund before the facts had been established? The report says the customer downloaded a game. If that game was corrupt with a virus, how is that PC Worlds fault? Quite obviously the PC was working before or they wouldn't have been able to download the game, would they? They got as far as switching on ok, connecting to the internet ok, so the thing was clearly working. I think PC World has every right to investigate. It is a shame it couldn't be done faster though.[/p][/quote]I agree, but not if it is going to take the until the 8th January. Being an IT reseller they should have the ability to carry out those checks in store and on the spot. If they know what they are doing it will take them less than 10 minutes to establish if the equipment is faulty. All HP PC's have a recovery partition. Hold down a function key on booting and restore the machine to factory settings. If that doesn't work then the chances are the PC is faulty. Either way the customer should be able to leave the store with a working PC. There are plenty of independent PC resellers, including some in Watford who know how to build a gaming PC, and actually have the knowledge to resolve a problem when things go wrong. You also get personal service from staff who appreciate that a child wants to be able to play with their Christmas present and not wait 10 days. The Rover

12:50pm Thu 26 Dec 13

The Rover says...

wd40 wrote:
What if the PC is not faulty but there is a problem with the operating system would it be Microsofts problem? What if the game that was downloaded caused a problem with the operating system is it their fault? Has it been contaminated? Although unfortunate and disappointing I think its unfair to blame a retailer when the cause of the issue needs to be investigated. If they replaced every PC that did not operate the way it was expected to because of problem software in the first instance they would be out of business very quickly. Give them the opportunity to find out what the problem is and then resolve it. What was the game BTW was it compatible with the hardware and operating system was it from a reputable site. I feel sorry for your son and hope he gets it back soon in a working state.
I agree that PC World should be given the opportunity to investigate the problem. It should take them no longer than an hour to do, and not until the 8th January. If they do not have the ability to do that why should the customer suffer?
[quote][p][bold]wd40[/bold] wrote: What if the PC is not faulty but there is a problem with the operating system would it be Microsofts problem? What if the game that was downloaded caused a problem with the operating system is it their fault? Has it been contaminated? Although unfortunate and disappointing I think its unfair to blame a retailer when the cause of the issue needs to be investigated. If they replaced every PC that did not operate the way it was expected to because of problem software in the first instance they would be out of business very quickly. Give them the opportunity to find out what the problem is and then resolve it. What was the game BTW was it compatible with the hardware and operating system was it from a reputable site. I feel sorry for your son and hope he gets it back soon in a working state.[/p][/quote]I agree that PC World should be given the opportunity to investigate the problem. It should take them no longer than an hour to do, and not until the 8th January. If they do not have the ability to do that why should the customer suffer? The Rover

2:51pm Thu 26 Dec 13

LSC says...

I agree 8th of January is too long. But expecting the Tech bods to be working on Boxing Day is a bit much. I'm not working today,and nor are most of the people reading this. I pity the generally unskilled shop staff who are made to because of the public's **** for a bargain.
It is Boxing day. I'm listening to Watford beat Millwall on the radio, eating Stilton and drinking Port. The commercial world is a long way from my mind.
I agree 8th of January is too long. But expecting the Tech bods to be working on Boxing Day is a bit much. I'm not working today,and nor are most of the people reading this. I pity the generally unskilled shop staff who are made to because of the public's **** for a bargain. It is Boxing day. I'm listening to Watford beat Millwall on the radio, eating Stilton and drinking Port. The commercial world is a long way from my mind. LSC

2:53pm Thu 26 Dec 13

LSC says...

l*u*s*t is a banned word? Wow, Auntie WO, I'll try to upset people by using that one again.
l*u*s*t is a banned word? Wow, Auntie WO, I'll try to upset people by using that one again. LSC

3:00pm Thu 26 Dec 13

Hornets number 12 fan says...

Similar to the shoddy service I got from Currys which are part of the same group I believe. They are a law unto themselves and they completely ignored their responsibilities under the sale of goods act. I vowed after three months of fighting with them that I would NEVER buy from them or PC World again and that was 6 years ago. I have kept my word they lost a customer that day and they deserved to lose many many more
Similar to the shoddy service I got from Currys which are part of the same group I believe. They are a law unto themselves and they completely ignored their responsibilities under the sale of goods act. I vowed after three months of fighting with them that I would NEVER buy from them or PC World again and that was 6 years ago. I have kept my word they lost a customer that day and they deserved to lose many many more Hornets number 12 fan

3:29pm Thu 26 Dec 13

gloryhornet4 says...

LSC wrote:
I don't believe the law says they HAVE to give you an exchange or refund at this point, but it is pretty stupid for them not to do so.
Many shops operate what is called a 'Good will policy'* for such cases. It might be worth asking if they have one.

*Good will policies are the ones that let you buy an outfit for a party, wear it then take it back and say it didn't fit or the colour looked wrong in sunlight. The law does not support you doing this, but many shops allow it.
Under the letter of the Law, PC World will have to check the claims are correct before you can play the 'unfit for purpose' card. How do they know you didn't pour a cup of tea over the thing, and won't do so again to the next one? Perhaps the downloaded game was corrupt? Is that their fault?

I'm sorry you had a bad experience, but you have to see both sides.
SG Act - fit for purpose. A PC must also be of satisfactory quality which rules out breaking down on its maiden flight. I don't "buy" the line loading a game on a PC as the cause of it breaking down, as 13 year olds have PC's bought for them and they don't use to put together Power Point presentations and complex speadsheets.

I had a similar incident earlier this year with a high street multiple PC supplier who offered a repair on a tablet as they had sold out and were not expecting new stock. I declined and the salesman said he did not have the authority to refund. I replied that I was not giving him a choice as I was rejecting the goods as faulty. Without moving from his post after a few buttons on his till I had my refund.

Its a try on and we consumers need to be clear in our words - I am rejecting your faulty goods and I do not want a repair.
[quote][p][bold]LSC[/bold] wrote: I don't believe the law says they HAVE to give you an exchange or refund at this point, but it is pretty stupid for them not to do so. Many shops operate what is called a 'Good will policy'* for such cases. It might be worth asking if they have one. *Good will policies are the ones that let you buy an outfit for a party, wear it then take it back and say it didn't fit or the colour looked wrong in sunlight. The law does not support you doing this, but many shops allow it. Under the letter of the Law, PC World will have to check the claims are correct before you can play the 'unfit for purpose' card. How do they know you didn't pour a cup of tea over the thing, and won't do so again to the next one? Perhaps the downloaded game was corrupt? Is that their fault? I'm sorry you had a bad experience, but you have to see both sides.[/p][/quote]SG Act - fit for purpose. A PC must also be of satisfactory quality which rules out breaking down on its maiden flight. I don't "buy" the line loading a game on a PC as the cause of it breaking down, as 13 year olds have PC's bought for them and they don't use to put together Power Point presentations and complex speadsheets. I had a similar incident earlier this year with a high street multiple PC supplier who offered a repair on a tablet as they had sold out and were not expecting new stock. I declined and the salesman said he did not have the authority to refund. I replied that I was not giving him a choice as I was rejecting the goods as faulty. Without moving from his post after a few buttons on his till I had my refund. Its a try on and we consumers need to be clear in our words - I am rejecting your faulty goods and I do not want a repair. gloryhornet4

5:00pm Thu 26 Dec 13

gloryhornet4 says...

The Rover wrote:
LSC wrote:
I don't believe the law says they HAVE to give you an exchange or refund at this point, but it is pretty stupid for them not to do so.
Many shops operate what is called a 'Good will policy'* for such cases. It might be worth asking if they have one.

*Good will policies are the ones that let you buy an outfit for a party, wear it then take it back and say it didn't fit or the colour looked wrong in sunlight. The law does not support you doing this, but many shops allow it.
Under the letter of the Law, PC World will have to check the claims are correct before you can play the 'unfit for purpose' card. How do they know you didn't pour a cup of tea over the thing, and won't do so again to the next one? Perhaps the downloaded game was corrupt? Is that their fault?

I'm sorry you had a bad experience, but you have to see both sides.
The "goodwill policy" is there for people who have changed their minds, or been given a gift they want to exchange. In this case the goods are faulty, not of merchantable quality, and the purchaser is entitled to a full refund.

Do not accept a repair. Insist on a replacement unit, and if they decline this then demand a refund. You are entitled to it. If they refuse to refund you and you paid by credit card then contact your card issuer and get the transaction reversed.

As others have said PC World is not the right place to purchase a gaming PC.
Sorry to be a tart.

Merchantable quality was replaced with satisfactory quality about 20 years ago by an amendment to the SGA. Unfortunately some retailers are working on the old law, which basically said if it worked - hard luck.

Here however a PC that won't load is neither.
[quote][p][bold]The Rover[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LSC[/bold] wrote: I don't believe the law says they HAVE to give you an exchange or refund at this point, but it is pretty stupid for them not to do so. Many shops operate what is called a 'Good will policy'* for such cases. It might be worth asking if they have one. *Good will policies are the ones that let you buy an outfit for a party, wear it then take it back and say it didn't fit or the colour looked wrong in sunlight. The law does not support you doing this, but many shops allow it. Under the letter of the Law, PC World will have to check the claims are correct before you can play the 'unfit for purpose' card. How do they know you didn't pour a cup of tea over the thing, and won't do so again to the next one? Perhaps the downloaded game was corrupt? Is that their fault? I'm sorry you had a bad experience, but you have to see both sides.[/p][/quote]The "goodwill policy" is there for people who have changed their minds, or been given a gift they want to exchange. In this case the goods are faulty, not of merchantable quality, and the purchaser is entitled to a full refund. Do not accept a repair. Insist on a replacement unit, and if they decline this then demand a refund. You are entitled to it. If they refuse to refund you and you paid by credit card then contact your card issuer and get the transaction reversed. As others have said PC World is not the right place to purchase a gaming PC.[/p][/quote]Sorry to be a tart. Merchantable quality was replaced with satisfactory quality about 20 years ago by an amendment to the SGA. Unfortunately some retailers are working on the old law, which basically said if it worked - hard luck. Here however a PC that won't load is neither. gloryhornet4

5:12pm Thu 26 Dec 13

gloryhornet4 says...

LSC wrote:
I agree 8th of January is too long. But expecting the Tech bods to be working on Boxing Day is a bit much. I'm not working today,and nor are most of the people reading this. I pity the generally unskilled shop staff who are made to because of the public's **** for a bargain.
It is Boxing day. I'm listening to Watford beat Millwall on the radio, eating Stilton and drinking Port. The commercial world is a long way from my mind.
LSC you are getting negative scores, but I think you are right.

Boxing day is to shift sales and many shops could not have a Danny S****U for returns getting in their way.

The day I hate most is 27 Dec. If I am working there is usually nowhere to get a sandwich so I need to go into the throngs of people taking back Danny they do not want or it does not fit, or I get no lunch.

Anyway - we have to accept that there will be a delay say until this Saturday to get a common sense answer from a shop on a problem like a PC. Little Johny or whatever can play with something else, it's not as if he is not spoilt without his PC I bet. 8 Jan is poor customer service and should not be tolerated. Not that from the description a repair should be accepted.

Hope you enjoyed the game. The woodwork got a peppering and there 2 more shouts for a penalty. 17 shots at goal and about 65% of the game. All we needed since October was to break out of walking pace when attacking and we are a threat again.
[quote][p][bold]LSC[/bold] wrote: I agree 8th of January is too long. But expecting the Tech bods to be working on Boxing Day is a bit much. I'm not working today,and nor are most of the people reading this. I pity the generally unskilled shop staff who are made to because of the public's **** for a bargain. It is Boxing day. I'm listening to Watford beat Millwall on the radio, eating Stilton and drinking Port. The commercial world is a long way from my mind.[/p][/quote]LSC you are getting negative scores, but I think you are right. Boxing day is to shift sales and many shops could not have a Danny S****U for returns getting in their way. The day I hate most is 27 Dec. If I am working there is usually nowhere to get a sandwich so I need to go into the throngs of people taking back Danny they do not want or it does not fit, or I get no lunch. Anyway - we have to accept that there will be a delay say until this Saturday to get a common sense answer from a shop on a problem like a PC. Little Johny or whatever can play with something else, it's not as if he is not spoilt without his PC I bet. 8 Jan is poor customer service and should not be tolerated. Not that from the description a repair should be accepted. Hope you enjoyed the game. The woodwork got a peppering and there 2 more shouts for a penalty. 17 shots at goal and about 65% of the game. All we needed since October was to break out of walking pace when attacking and we are a threat again. gloryhornet4

9:48pm Thu 26 Dec 13

Popeonarope says...

Personally i wont ever buy anything from PC World as i have never had a decent experience from them.
From one of their 'engineers' trying to convince me an incompatible architecture HDD would be fine with my old PC, to being ignored by two salespeople who were more interested in having a conversation about their night out instead of taking my money.
A neighbor took a laptop into their repair center last year to remove a virus - a simple procedure' instead they wiped the HDD including the photos on it. Luckily it was backed up but could have bad as they didn't back up anything!

There are plenty of better choices - I use RLSupplies in Watford. A basic premises but a knowledgeable bunch of techies as required. For online orders i have never had a problem with Dell in 16 years and 30+ PCs purchased.
Novatech were very also good and fixed a faulty graphics card the day after i reported it..
All will provide a decent PC for the price quoted.
Personally i wont ever buy anything from PC World as i have never had a decent experience from them. From one of their 'engineers' trying to convince me an incompatible architecture HDD would be fine with my old PC, to being ignored by two salespeople who were more interested in having a conversation about their night out instead of taking my money. A neighbor took a laptop into their repair center last year to remove a virus - a simple procedure' instead they wiped the HDD including the photos on it. Luckily it was backed up but could have bad as they didn't back up anything! There are plenty of better choices - I use RLSupplies in Watford. A basic premises but a knowledgeable bunch of techies as required. For online orders i have never had a problem with Dell in 16 years and 30+ PCs purchased. Novatech were very also good and fixed a faulty graphics card the day after i reported it.. All will provide a decent PC for the price quoted. Popeonarope

9:57pm Thu 26 Dec 13

ateddy says...

Some people are such big liars and attention seekers! How do you even knoe if they used their pc correctly. Are you trying to say that a good company will produce £550 pound worth of a machine without doing any quality test?? And a company like pc world will make money out of sending a machine for repair! Get your facts right before publishing any rubbish biased news and stop abusing the power of media with corrupt tacts!
Some people are such big liars and attention seekers! How do you even knoe if they used their pc correctly. Are you trying to say that a good company will produce £550 pound worth of a machine without doing any quality test?? And a company like pc world will make money out of sending a machine for repair! Get your facts right before publishing any rubbish biased news and stop abusing the power of media with corrupt tacts! ateddy

10:45pm Thu 26 Dec 13

LSC says...

Gloryhornet, I'm used to the thumbs down for having an opinion. The PC was working. It must have been as they set up the FireWall and Anti Virus before they tried to download anything.Then the anti Malware and the roveiving Ip address.
All basic essentials before you even think to download a game.
So it was working quite well, seems to me.

In other news; Go the Hornets!
Gloryhornet, I'm used to the thumbs down for having an opinion. The PC was working. It must have been as they set up the FireWall and Anti Virus before they tried to download anything.Then the anti Malware and the roveiving Ip address. All basic essentials before you even think to download a game. So it was working quite well, seems to me. In other news; Go the Hornets! LSC

10:23am Fri 27 Dec 13

Simon_Watkins says...

LSC wrote:
Gloryhornet, I'm used to the thumbs down for having an opinion. The PC was working. It must have been as they set up the FireWall and Anti Virus before they tried to download anything.Then the anti Malware and the roveiving Ip address.
All basic essentials before you even think to download a game.
So it was working quite well, seems to me.

In other news; Go the Hornets!
Oh so the PC *was* working. Majority of hardware faults occur in the first 28 dates. Any idiot knows that. How is the fact that it *was* working relevant exactly? The only relevant part is that it's not working now.

Gee, it seems that some people are suspiciously keen to be apologists for PC world's ineptitude don't ya think?(!)
[quote][p][bold]LSC[/bold] wrote: Gloryhornet, I'm used to the thumbs down for having an opinion. The PC was working. It must have been as they set up the FireWall and Anti Virus before they tried to download anything.Then the anti Malware and the roveiving Ip address. All basic essentials before you even think to download a game. So it was working quite well, seems to me. In other news; Go the Hornets![/p][/quote]Oh so the PC *was* working. Majority of hardware faults occur in the first 28 dates. Any idiot knows that. How is the fact that it *was* working relevant exactly? The only relevant part is that it's not working now. Gee, it seems that some people are suspiciously keen to be apologists for PC world's ineptitude don't ya think?(!) Simon_Watkins

10:29am Fri 27 Dec 13

Simon_Watkins says...

gloryhornet4 wrote:
LSC wrote:
I agree 8th of January is too long. But expecting the Tech bods to be working on Boxing Day is a bit much. I'm not working today,and nor are most of the people reading this. I pity the generally unskilled shop staff who are made to because of the public's **** for a bargain.
It is Boxing day. I'm listening to Watford beat Millwall on the radio, eating Stilton and drinking Port. The commercial world is a long way from my mind.
LSC you are getting negative scores, but I think you are right.

Boxing day is to shift sales and many shops could not have a Danny S****U for returns getting in their way.

The day I hate most is 27 Dec. If I am working there is usually nowhere to get a sandwich so I need to go into the throngs of people taking back Danny they do not want or it does not fit, or I get no lunch.

Anyway - we have to accept that there will be a delay say until this Saturday to get a common sense answer from a shop on a problem like a PC. Little Johny or whatever can play with something else, it's not as if he is not spoilt without his PC I bet. 8 Jan is poor customer service and should not be tolerated. Not that from the description a repair should be accepted.

Hope you enjoyed the game. The woodwork got a peppering and there 2 more shouts for a penalty. 17 shots at goal and about 65% of the game. All we needed since October was to break out of walking pace when attacking and we are a threat again.
I'm sure traders would love to sell more and more new stock every day, not just Boxing Day, but it doesn't exempt them from their Sale of Goods Act *legal* responsibilities. Get real!
[quote][p][bold]gloryhornet4[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LSC[/bold] wrote: I agree 8th of January is too long. But expecting the Tech bods to be working on Boxing Day is a bit much. I'm not working today,and nor are most of the people reading this. I pity the generally unskilled shop staff who are made to because of the public's **** for a bargain. It is Boxing day. I'm listening to Watford beat Millwall on the radio, eating Stilton and drinking Port. The commercial world is a long way from my mind.[/p][/quote]LSC you are getting negative scores, but I think you are right. Boxing day is to shift sales and many shops could not have a Danny S****U for returns getting in their way. The day I hate most is 27 Dec. If I am working there is usually nowhere to get a sandwich so I need to go into the throngs of people taking back Danny they do not want or it does not fit, or I get no lunch. Anyway - we have to accept that there will be a delay say until this Saturday to get a common sense answer from a shop on a problem like a PC. Little Johny or whatever can play with something else, it's not as if he is not spoilt without his PC I bet. 8 Jan is poor customer service and should not be tolerated. Not that from the description a repair should be accepted. Hope you enjoyed the game. The woodwork got a peppering and there 2 more shouts for a penalty. 17 shots at goal and about 65% of the game. All we needed since October was to break out of walking pace when attacking and we are a threat again.[/p][/quote]I'm sure traders would love to sell more and more new stock every day, not just Boxing Day, but it doesn't exempt them from their Sale of Goods Act *legal* responsibilities. Get real! Simon_Watkins

11:25am Fri 27 Dec 13

CaptainPC says...

smalon wrote:
If you have bought that PC with the intention of your son being able to play games on it as well as use it for general purposes, I suggest that you try to get your money back and buy a PC from an online retailer that specialises in gaming PCs.
What you get at Currys/ PC World is woefully under-powered to play modern games on, and I'm talking their high-end systems so your £550 PC stands no chance.
Their are plenty of sites you could get a good system from for your £550 such as Cyberpower, Wired2fire, PCspecialist, Dinopc and many more.
That is the most boring post I have ever seen on this site......
[quote][p][bold]smalon[/bold] wrote: If you have bought that PC with the intention of your son being able to play games on it as well as use it for general purposes, I suggest that you try to get your money back and buy a PC from an online retailer that specialises in gaming PCs. What you get at Currys/ PC World is woefully under-powered to play modern games on, and I'm talking their high-end systems so your £550 PC stands no chance. Their are plenty of sites you could get a good system from for your £550 such as Cyberpower, Wired2fire, PCspecialist, Dinopc and many more.[/p][/quote]That is the most boring post I have ever seen on this site...... CaptainPC

11:58am Fri 27 Dec 13

LSC says...

"I'm sure traders would love to sell more and more new stock every day, not just Boxing Day, but it doesn't exempt them from their Sale of Goods Act *legal* responsibilities. Get real!"

The Sale of Goods Act isn't a catch-all get out of jail free card. Quite clearly the computer was working at the point of sale, so the shop is clear on the SaGA. IF the shop also sold the customer the game, then there might be a case, but it appears they didn't.
So we are out of the sale of Goods Act and into a Warranty issue anyway.
That being so, the shop has the right to investigate, especially as software, that I presume they did not recommend, had been added to the product.
If I put 25" wheels on my new car after I take it home, and then the rear axle falls off, it isn't the car salesman's fault unless I asked, and he assured me, the car could cope with 25" wheels from a certain supplier. If the car could cope with those wheels, the chances are it would be an optional extra anyway and the shop would have sold me them themselves to bump the price up.

Having said that, it is reasonable to expect a PC to have games installed, and it should be able to cope with that. But what game and from where?
It is only fair they find out. If it was from Pirate Bay and contained Malware, the shop has no responsibility whatsoever. For a £550 sale, they have every right to find that out.

There was a recent thing on 4Chan where someone asked how to speed up their PC, and some 'joker' replied that they should delete the system32 file. (Please do not do this folks). Apparently hundreds did though.
Presumably some of those hundreds were still under warranty; do you think they should get a free replacement?
"I'm sure traders would love to sell more and more new stock every day, not just Boxing Day, but it doesn't exempt them from their Sale of Goods Act *legal* responsibilities. Get real!" The Sale of Goods Act isn't a catch-all get out of jail free card. Quite clearly the computer was working at the point of sale, so the shop is clear on the SaGA. IF the shop also sold the customer the game, then there might be a case, but it appears they didn't. So we are out of the sale of Goods Act and into a Warranty issue anyway. That being so, the shop has the right to investigate, especially as software, that I presume they did not recommend, had been added to the product. If I put 25" wheels on my new car after I take it home, and then the rear axle falls off, it isn't the car salesman's fault unless I asked, and he assured me, the car could cope with 25" wheels from a certain supplier. If the car could cope with those wheels, the chances are it would be an optional extra anyway and the shop would have sold me them themselves to bump the price up. Having said that, it is reasonable to expect a PC to have games installed, and it should be able to cope with that. But what game and from where? It is only fair they find out. If it was from Pirate Bay and contained Malware, the shop has no responsibility whatsoever. For a £550 sale, they have every right to find that out. There was a recent thing on 4Chan where someone asked how to speed up their PC, and some 'joker' replied that they should delete the system32 file. (Please do not do this folks). Apparently hundreds did though. Presumably some of those hundreds were still under warranty; do you think they should get a free replacement? LSC

1:09pm Fri 27 Dec 13

EU_OUT_NOW says...

Goodness me, poor old PC World, getting a hammering when none of the true facts are made available? (1) Downloaded game? (2) Was the game from a legitimate source? (3) Did it carry a virus with it? (4) Was it compatible with Windows 8? or 8.1? (5) Was it downloaded and installed correctly? Bottom line! Windows usually goes into "repairing itself" (repair mode) when there is a software conflict and/or the Operating System has been damaged or corrupted by the user! So lets hear the full story WO. No of course we wont!
Goodness me, poor old PC World, getting a hammering when none of the true facts are made available? (1) Downloaded game? (2) Was the game from a legitimate source? (3) Did it carry a virus with it? (4) Was it compatible with Windows 8? or 8.1? (5) Was it downloaded and installed correctly? Bottom line! Windows usually goes into "repairing itself" (repair mode) when there is a software conflict and/or the Operating System has been damaged or corrupted by the user! So lets hear the full story WO. No of course we wont! EU_OUT_NOW

1:44pm Fri 27 Dec 13

EU_OUT_NOW says...

LSC wrote:
l*u*s*t is a banned word? Wow, Auntie WO, I'll try to upset people by using that one again.
They can't ban that word? It's what makes the world go round and relationships FUN...)::):):):)
[quote][p][bold]LSC[/bold] wrote: l*u*s*t is a banned word? Wow, Auntie WO, I'll try to upset people by using that one again.[/p][/quote]They can't ban that word? It's what makes the world go round and relationships FUN...)::):):):) EU_OUT_NOW

3:38pm Fri 27 Dec 13

KeithMercer says...

PC WORLD completely sucks and I would never buy anything ever from them again after a similar story a few years ago. I bought a Sony Vaio and was strongly sold an insurance policy with the TECH GUYS.A few months later when I had major problems with the Laptop I took it in to the TECH GUYS fully expecting them (maybe naively )to fix it on the spot or at least in a few hours. Instead they told me they would send it away and it would be at least 3 weeks before I saw it again. Unhappy at this I tried to contact the TECH GUYS on the phone to voice my displeasure , this took forever and then they eventually told me that as it was under a year old that Sony were responsible and that I should take my complaint up with them.
To cut a long story short Sony fixed the laptop no problem and very quickly using couriers at their expense. The question is WHY ARE PC WORLD SELLING EXPENSIVE INSURANCE POLICIES ? When they are not prepared to help and then just pass you on to the original manufacturer.
My sympathies go out to anyone unfortunate enough to have to deal with the TECH GUYS ! THEY SUCK !!!!!
PC WORLD completely sucks and I would never buy anything ever from them again after a similar story a few years ago. I bought a Sony Vaio and was strongly sold an insurance policy with the TECH GUYS.A few months later when I had major problems with the Laptop I took it in to the TECH GUYS fully expecting them (maybe naively )to fix it on the spot or at least in a few hours. Instead they told me they would send it away and it would be at least 3 weeks before I saw it again. Unhappy at this I tried to contact the TECH GUYS on the phone to voice my displeasure , this took forever and then they eventually told me that as it was under a year old that Sony were responsible and that I should take my complaint up with them. To cut a long story short Sony fixed the laptop no problem and very quickly using couriers at their expense. The question is WHY ARE PC WORLD SELLING EXPENSIVE INSURANCE POLICIES ? When they are not prepared to help and then just pass you on to the original manufacturer. My sympathies go out to anyone unfortunate enough to have to deal with the TECH GUYS ! THEY SUCK !!!!! KeithMercer

4:42pm Fri 27 Dec 13

Hampermill-Mike says...

I don't intend to bad mouth PC World. The problem mentioned usually happened with Windows 7 detects a corrupted file. It stops, demands a restart and then you get a message about attempting to do a restore which usually fails.

The problem is nearly always down to a file download of the wrong type. Windows 7 will load in 32 or 64 bit modes depending on the computer make.
If you download a programme with 32 properties it may run on a 64 bit machine but if it loads a 32 bit file and overwrites an important 64 bit one then you will find yourself in this sort of mess.

The lesson is ALWAYS load the correct version for your computer.

Right click "my Computer" click on "properties" which will reveal what type your computer is.

Until the real story is known then !
I don't intend to bad mouth PC World. The problem mentioned usually happened with Windows 7 detects a corrupted file. It stops, demands a restart and then you get a message about attempting to do a restore which usually fails. The problem is nearly always down to a file download of the wrong type. Windows 7 will load in 32 or 64 bit modes depending on the computer make. If you download a programme with 32 properties it may run on a 64 bit machine but if it loads a 32 bit file and overwrites an important 64 bit one then you will find yourself in this sort of mess. The lesson is ALWAYS load the correct version for your computer. Right click "my Computer" click on "properties" which will reveal what type your computer is. Until the real story is known then ! Hampermill-Mike

6:23pm Fri 27 Dec 13

EU_OUT_NOW says...

Hampermill-Mike wrote:
I don't intend to bad mouth PC World. The problem mentioned usually happened with Windows 7 detects a corrupted file. It stops, demands a restart and then you get a message about attempting to do a restore which usually fails.

The problem is nearly always down to a file download of the wrong type. Windows 7 will load in 32 or 64 bit modes depending on the computer make.
If you download a programme with 32 properties it may run on a 64 bit machine but if it loads a 32 bit file and overwrites an important 64 bit one then you will find yourself in this sort of mess.

The lesson is ALWAYS load the correct version for your computer.

Right click "my Computer" click on "properties" which will reveal what type your computer is.

Until the real story is known then !
Your pretty close, it tends to be drivers that cause the main problem. Of course you are quite right, 64-bit drivers/software wont run on a 32-bit Windows O/S but usually will work the other way round (but not always). There is a good Microsoft/Windows web page that explains this well, 32-bit and 64-bit Windows: Frequently asked questions. (I would copy and paste the URL, but the WO filter will undoubtedly block it.)
[quote][p][bold]Hampermill-Mike[/bold] wrote: I don't intend to bad mouth PC World. The problem mentioned usually happened with Windows 7 detects a corrupted file. It stops, demands a restart and then you get a message about attempting to do a restore which usually fails. The problem is nearly always down to a file download of the wrong type. Windows 7 will load in 32 or 64 bit modes depending on the computer make. If you download a programme with 32 properties it may run on a 64 bit machine but if it loads a 32 bit file and overwrites an important 64 bit one then you will find yourself in this sort of mess. The lesson is ALWAYS load the correct version for your computer. Right click "my Computer" click on "properties" which will reveal what type your computer is. Until the real story is known then ![/p][/quote]Your pretty close, it tends to be drivers that cause the main problem. Of course you are quite right, 64-bit drivers/software wont run on a 32-bit Windows O/S but usually will work the other way round (but not always). There is a good Microsoft/Windows web page that explains this well, 32-bit and 64-bit Windows: Frequently asked questions. (I would copy and paste the URL, but the WO filter will undoubtedly block it.) EU_OUT_NOW

9:30pm Fri 27 Dec 13

kingofpop says...

Shouldn't matter what day of the year it is...they should still offer the same level of service! If you go out for a meal and order 20 minutes before service stops would it be acceptable to get less care taken with your meal? All yhese places are the same and do everything they can to avoid refunds....havent seen anyone post anything about a positive experience at pc world, which makes me think there must be a reason. Is it even legal for a store to sell an item, then refuse to refund/fix it and tell the consumer to go direct to the product maker?
Shouldn't matter what day of the year it is...they should still offer the same level of service! If you go out for a meal and order 20 minutes before service stops would it be acceptable to get less care taken with your meal? All yhese places are the same and do everything they can to avoid refunds....havent seen anyone post anything about a positive experience at pc world, which makes me think there must be a reason. Is it even legal for a store to sell an item, then refuse to refund/fix it and tell the consumer to go direct to the product maker? kingofpop

10:11am Sat 28 Dec 13

Andrew Turpie says...

All I can tell from the story above us that the windows registry corruption which 99% of the time is either down to installing a poorly coded application or the machine has had the power interrupted whilst writing to the registry. All manufacturers now have on board recovery build into a hidden partition on the hard drive and I'm certain in can be invoked by hitting F10/11 on boot up.

Since Vista, most machines do not include recovery disks (a move by Microsoft to combat piracy) there are warnings inside that tell you to create recovery media, when you first boot to desktop from new pop up messages keep reminding you like an old annoying aunt to create them until you tick the "Do not remind me again" option and close the window down (which most of my customers at the time chose to ignore both the written and pop ups lol).

PC World are box shifters, that's why they are the cheapest store retailers around. They sell at a near loss each device and rely on the extras like the sales of Office, Anti virus and the services like setting up and installing software to break even. The PC performance warranty for 7 quid a month suited some people who trashed their machines with malware as they just rocked in with their machine on a fortnightly basis and data was backed up and restored without question. One person who could have done with it I remember was a lass who purchased a £700 Sony Viao laptop and within 3 days smashed the LCD screen by closing the lid without realising a pen was resting on the keys. In a nut shell its horses for courses.

But that was over 5 years ago since I left there to go onto other things and business models and policies may have changed.

I notice the originators live in my street and I think I know them to say morning to and if they track me down from reading this I will willing to help with future tech issues as I do for many neighbours in Souldern Street :)
All I can tell from the story above us that the windows registry corruption which 99% of the time is either down to installing a poorly coded application or the machine has had the power interrupted whilst writing to the registry. All manufacturers now have on board recovery build into a hidden partition on the hard drive and I'm certain in can be invoked by hitting F10/11 on boot up. Since Vista, most machines do not include recovery disks (a move by Microsoft to combat piracy) there are warnings inside that tell you to create recovery media, when you first boot to desktop from new pop up messages keep reminding you like an old annoying aunt to create them until you tick the "Do not remind me again" option and close the window down (which most of my customers at the time chose to ignore both the written and pop ups lol). PC World are box shifters, that's why they are the cheapest store retailers around. They sell at a near loss each device and rely on the extras like the sales of Office, Anti virus and the services like setting up and installing software to break even. The PC performance warranty for 7 quid a month suited some people who trashed their machines with malware as they just rocked in with their machine on a fortnightly basis and data was backed up and restored without question. One person who could have done with it I remember was a lass who purchased a £700 Sony Viao laptop and within 3 days smashed the LCD screen by closing the lid without realising a pen was resting on the keys. In a nut shell its horses for courses. But that was over 5 years ago since I left there to go onto other things and business models and policies may have changed. I notice the originators live in my street and I think I know them to say morning to and if they track me down from reading this I will willing to help with future tech issues as I do for many neighbours in Souldern Street :) Andrew Turpie

11:37am Sat 28 Dec 13

ian.hooker says...

ateddy wrote:
Some people are such big liars and attention seekers! How do you even knoe if they used their pc correctly. Are you trying to say that a good company will produce £550 pound worth of a machine without doing any quality test?? And a company like pc world will make money out of sending a machine for repair! Get your facts right before publishing any rubbish biased news and stop abusing the power of media with corrupt tacts!
Of course manufacturers run tests but occasionally a fault will not appear for a day, a week, a month or even a year etc. PC World should have been able to see if the fault was likely to have been inflicted by the customer within an hour or two - not take nearly 2 weeks. If they can't do that they should have replaced or refunded as a gesture of good will. The assistant was clearly a "jobsworth". But I agree with others who say this is a slow news day "dead donkey".
[quote][p][bold]ateddy[/bold] wrote: Some people are such big liars and attention seekers! How do you even knoe if they used their pc correctly. Are you trying to say that a good company will produce £550 pound worth of a machine without doing any quality test?? And a company like pc world will make money out of sending a machine for repair! Get your facts right before publishing any rubbish biased news and stop abusing the power of media with corrupt tacts![/p][/quote]Of course manufacturers run tests but occasionally a fault will not appear for a day, a week, a month or even a year etc. PC World should have been able to see if the fault was likely to have been inflicted by the customer within an hour or two - not take nearly 2 weeks. If they can't do that they should have replaced or refunded as a gesture of good will. The assistant was clearly a "jobsworth". But I agree with others who say this is a slow news day "dead donkey". ian.hooker

12:23pm Sat 28 Dec 13

EU_OUT_NOW says...

kingofpop wrote:
Shouldn't matter what day of the year it is...they should still offer the same level of service! If you go out for a meal and order 20 minutes before service stops would it be acceptable to get less care taken with your meal? All yhese places are the same and do everything they can to avoid refunds....havent seen anyone post anything about a positive experience at pc world, which makes me think there must be a reason. Is it even legal for a store to sell an item, then refuse to refund/fix it and tell the consumer to go direct to the product maker?
Problem?
"My laptop is broken, can I get it repaired or replaced" (put this in Google) .............. found on the Which website (can't put the whole URL, WO will block it) There is also a good video explaining the consumers rights on the same page.

The Sale of Goods Act states that products should be as described, of satisfactory quality and fit for purpose.

If a laptop you’ve bought develops a FAULT, you have the right to reject it and get your money back, or you can have it repaired or replaced............
.....

Question is, was it fit for the purpose? Did it develop a FAULT? That is to say, was the O/S messed up? If so by whom or what? Who, if that's what happened is responsible for user error? PC World, the manufacturer or the user?
[quote][p][bold]kingofpop[/bold] wrote: Shouldn't matter what day of the year it is...they should still offer the same level of service! If you go out for a meal and order 20 minutes before service stops would it be acceptable to get less care taken with your meal? All yhese places are the same and do everything they can to avoid refunds....havent seen anyone post anything about a positive experience at pc world, which makes me think there must be a reason. Is it even legal for a store to sell an item, then refuse to refund/fix it and tell the consumer to go direct to the product maker?[/p][/quote]Problem? "My laptop is broken, can I get it repaired or replaced" (put this in Google) .............. found on the Which website (can't put the whole URL, WO will block it) There is also a good video explaining the consumers rights on the same page. The Sale of Goods Act states that products should be as described, of satisfactory quality and fit for purpose. If a laptop you’ve bought develops a FAULT, you have the right to reject it and get your money back, or you can have it repaired or replaced............ ..... Question is, was it fit for the purpose? Did it develop a FAULT? That is to say, was the O/S messed up? If so by whom or what? Who, if that's what happened is responsible for user error? PC World, the manufacturer or the user? EU_OUT_NOW

12:42pm Sat 28 Dec 13

EU_OUT_NOW says...

Andrew Turpie wrote:
All I can tell from the story above us that the windows registry corruption which 99% of the time is either down to installing a poorly coded application or the machine has had the power interrupted whilst writing to the registry. All manufacturers now have on board recovery build into a hidden partition on the hard drive and I'm certain in can be invoked by hitting F10/11 on boot up.

Since Vista, most machines do not include recovery disks (a move by Microsoft to combat piracy) there are warnings inside that tell you to create recovery media, when you first boot to desktop from new pop up messages keep reminding you like an old annoying aunt to create them until you tick the "Do not remind me again" option and close the window down (which most of my customers at the time chose to ignore both the written and pop ups lol).

PC World are box shifters, that's why they are the cheapest store retailers around. They sell at a near loss each device and rely on the extras like the sales of Office, Anti virus and the services like setting up and installing software to break even. The PC performance warranty for 7 quid a month suited some people who trashed their machines with malware as they just rocked in with their machine on a fortnightly basis and data was backed up and restored without question. One person who could have done with it I remember was a lass who purchased a £700 Sony Viao laptop and within 3 days smashed the LCD screen by closing the lid without realising a pen was resting on the keys. In a nut shell its horses for courses.

But that was over 5 years ago since I left there to go onto other things and business models and policies may have changed.

I notice the originators live in my street and I think I know them to say morning to and if they track me down from reading this I will willing to help with future tech issues as I do for many neighbours in Souldern Street :)
At last!!!! Someone on here that puts a sensible objective view forward. I do the same for my friends and neighbours too. Registry corruption, driver conflicts, blue screen crash, wont boot past BIOS....... and so on, sometimes fixing the same machine several times. Users often don't even try to learn the basics of Windows and ignore or don't follow "Initial Setup" such as my neighbour who set up his nice new Windows 8 laptop to speak German in error..):):)
[quote][p][bold]Andrew Turpie[/bold] wrote: All I can tell from the story above us that the windows registry corruption which 99% of the time is either down to installing a poorly coded application or the machine has had the power interrupted whilst writing to the registry. All manufacturers now have on board recovery build into a hidden partition on the hard drive and I'm certain in can be invoked by hitting F10/11 on boot up. Since Vista, most machines do not include recovery disks (a move by Microsoft to combat piracy) there are warnings inside that tell you to create recovery media, when you first boot to desktop from new pop up messages keep reminding you like an old annoying aunt to create them until you tick the "Do not remind me again" option and close the window down (which most of my customers at the time chose to ignore both the written and pop ups lol). PC World are box shifters, that's why they are the cheapest store retailers around. They sell at a near loss each device and rely on the extras like the sales of Office, Anti virus and the services like setting up and installing software to break even. The PC performance warranty for 7 quid a month suited some people who trashed their machines with malware as they just rocked in with their machine on a fortnightly basis and data was backed up and restored without question. One person who could have done with it I remember was a lass who purchased a £700 Sony Viao laptop and within 3 days smashed the LCD screen by closing the lid without realising a pen was resting on the keys. In a nut shell its horses for courses. But that was over 5 years ago since I left there to go onto other things and business models and policies may have changed. I notice the originators live in my street and I think I know them to say morning to and if they track me down from reading this I will willing to help with future tech issues as I do for many neighbours in Souldern Street :)[/p][/quote]At last!!!! Someone on here that puts a sensible objective view forward. I do the same for my friends and neighbours too. Registry corruption, driver conflicts, blue screen crash, wont boot past BIOS....... and so on, sometimes fixing the same machine several times. Users often don't even try to learn the basics of Windows and ignore or don't follow "Initial Setup" such as my neighbour who set up his nice new Windows 8 laptop to speak German in error..):):) EU_OUT_NOW

1:02pm Sat 28 Dec 13

Reader (R) says...

Lets hope you kept the receipt for the anti -virus software safe.
Lets hope you kept the receipt for the anti -virus software safe. Reader (R)

1:14pm Sat 28 Dec 13

Andrew Turpie says...

EU_OUT_NOW wrote:
Andrew Turpie wrote:
All I can tell from the story above us that the windows registry corruption which 99% of the time is either down to installing a poorly coded application or the machine has had the power interrupted whilst writing to the registry. All manufacturers now have on board recovery build into a hidden partition on the hard drive and I'm certain in can be invoked by hitting F10/11 on boot up.

Since Vista, most machines do not include recovery disks (a move by Microsoft to combat piracy) there are warnings inside that tell you to create recovery media, when you first boot to desktop from new pop up messages keep reminding you like an old annoying aunt to create them until you tick the "Do not remind me again" option and close the window down (which most of my customers at the time chose to ignore both the written and pop ups lol).

PC World are box shifters, that's why they are the cheapest store retailers around. They sell at a near loss each device and rely on the extras like the sales of Office, Anti virus and the services like setting up and installing software to break even. The PC performance warranty for 7 quid a month suited some people who trashed their machines with malware as they just rocked in with their machine on a fortnightly basis and data was backed up and restored without question. One person who could have done with it I remember was a lass who purchased a £700 Sony Viao laptop and within 3 days smashed the LCD screen by closing the lid without realising a pen was resting on the keys. In a nut shell its horses for courses.

But that was over 5 years ago since I left there to go onto other things and business models and policies may have changed.

I notice the originators live in my street and I think I know them to say morning to and if they track me down from reading this I will willing to help with future tech issues as I do for many neighbours in Souldern Street :)
At last!!!! Someone on here that puts a sensible objective view forward. I do the same for my friends and neighbours too. Registry corruption, driver conflicts, blue screen crash, wont boot past BIOS....... and so on, sometimes fixing the same machine several times. Users often don't even try to learn the basics of Windows and ignore or don't follow "Initial Setup" such as my neighbour who set up his nice new Windows 8 laptop to speak German in error..):):)
Ha ha- yep it does happen, after spending 18 months as a tech guy and on the customer service desk, i believe I have almost seen it all from the dark side of capitalism and where seemly normal customer go absolutely nuts (physical, verbal and racial abuse), a downside to the drug known as consumerism. Thankfully none were aimed at me as I always checked and double checked my tech work and always aimed for a win/win situ between customer and store. What is apparent, the public at large do see computers and notebooks as white goods and are as interested in the workings of inside one as I am interested of the insides of a fridge freezer. I must say during my time down at the store I had built up a bit of a clientele who would only want to deal with me even on the shop floor and a few desperately tracking me down after I left to do work for them.

I would say that about 80% of not working returns were user related and a full destructive recovery sorted the issues, the remaining 20% were down to hardware which I used my on personal diagnostic routines to get faster results.

I understand that the tech guys no longer reside in stores, which is a shame as then when I was there we would have had the capacity to fire this up on the bench whilst the customer was there and get it sorted pronto.
[quote][p][bold]EU_OUT_NOW[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andrew Turpie[/bold] wrote: All I can tell from the story above us that the windows registry corruption which 99% of the time is either down to installing a poorly coded application or the machine has had the power interrupted whilst writing to the registry. All manufacturers now have on board recovery build into a hidden partition on the hard drive and I'm certain in can be invoked by hitting F10/11 on boot up. Since Vista, most machines do not include recovery disks (a move by Microsoft to combat piracy) there are warnings inside that tell you to create recovery media, when you first boot to desktop from new pop up messages keep reminding you like an old annoying aunt to create them until you tick the "Do not remind me again" option and close the window down (which most of my customers at the time chose to ignore both the written and pop ups lol). PC World are box shifters, that's why they are the cheapest store retailers around. They sell at a near loss each device and rely on the extras like the sales of Office, Anti virus and the services like setting up and installing software to break even. The PC performance warranty for 7 quid a month suited some people who trashed their machines with malware as they just rocked in with their machine on a fortnightly basis and data was backed up and restored without question. One person who could have done with it I remember was a lass who purchased a £700 Sony Viao laptop and within 3 days smashed the LCD screen by closing the lid without realising a pen was resting on the keys. In a nut shell its horses for courses. But that was over 5 years ago since I left there to go onto other things and business models and policies may have changed. I notice the originators live in my street and I think I know them to say morning to and if they track me down from reading this I will willing to help with future tech issues as I do for many neighbours in Souldern Street :)[/p][/quote]At last!!!! Someone on here that puts a sensible objective view forward. I do the same for my friends and neighbours too. Registry corruption, driver conflicts, blue screen crash, wont boot past BIOS....... and so on, sometimes fixing the same machine several times. Users often don't even try to learn the basics of Windows and ignore or don't follow "Initial Setup" such as my neighbour who set up his nice new Windows 8 laptop to speak German in error..):):)[/p][/quote]Ha ha- yep it does happen, after spending 18 months as a tech guy and on the customer service desk, i believe I have almost seen it all from the dark side of capitalism and where seemly normal customer go absolutely nuts (physical, verbal and racial abuse), a downside to the drug known as consumerism. Thankfully none were aimed at me as I always checked and double checked my tech work and always aimed for a win/win situ between customer and store. What is apparent, the public at large do see computers and notebooks as white goods and are as interested in the workings of inside one as I am interested of the insides of a fridge freezer. I must say during my time down at the store I had built up a bit of a clientele who would only want to deal with me even on the shop floor and a few desperately tracking me down after I left to do work for them. I would say that about 80% of not working returns were user related and a full destructive recovery sorted the issues, the remaining 20% were down to hardware which I used my on personal diagnostic routines to get faster results. I understand that the tech guys no longer reside in stores, which is a shame as then when I was there we would have had the capacity to fire this up on the bench whilst the customer was there and get it sorted pronto. Andrew Turpie

1:29pm Sat 28 Dec 13

Andrew Turpie says...

Always use the analogy, that if you buy a petrol driven car, take it straight to the garage and fill it with diesel, you cannot hold the retailer responsible, hence why operating systems and software are not covered in warranty and warranty is strictly hardware only. A lot of people still believe that laptop batteries and power supplies are covered, but technically are not as battery cells can be destroyed via a poor charge/discharge and power supply units can be destroyed with poor dirty mains surges and spikes. These are deemed as consumables and if reported to the manufacturer may be changed as a gesture of good will :)
Always use the analogy, that if you buy a petrol driven car, take it straight to the garage and fill it with diesel, you cannot hold the retailer responsible, hence why operating systems and software are not covered in warranty and warranty is strictly hardware only. A lot of people still believe that laptop batteries and power supplies are covered, but technically are not as battery cells can be destroyed via a poor charge/discharge and power supply units can be destroyed with poor dirty mains surges and spikes. These are deemed as consumables and if reported to the manufacturer may be changed as a gesture of good will :) Andrew Turpie

2:28pm Sat 28 Dec 13

EU_OUT_NOW says...

Andrew Turpie wrote:
Always use the analogy, that if you buy a petrol driven car, take it straight to the garage and fill it with diesel, you cannot hold the retailer responsible, hence why operating systems and software are not covered in warranty and warranty is strictly hardware only. A lot of people still believe that laptop batteries and power supplies are covered, but technically are not as battery cells can be destroyed via a poor charge/discharge and power supply units can be destroyed with poor dirty mains surges and spikes. These are deemed as consumables and if reported to the manufacturer may be changed as a gesture of good will :)
A very good analogy, unfortunately as you say the consumer tends to see PCs/Laptops as white goods. It's broke so I want a new one!.... I don't care who broke it I still want a new one!...):):):): Haven't been into PC World for a long time as I buy all my parts online, surprised to hear they have shut down their Tech Centre..... It used to set them apart from the others. Ah well, maybe they will go the Comet way?
[quote][p][bold]Andrew Turpie[/bold] wrote: Always use the analogy, that if you buy a petrol driven car, take it straight to the garage and fill it with diesel, you cannot hold the retailer responsible, hence why operating systems and software are not covered in warranty and warranty is strictly hardware only. A lot of people still believe that laptop batteries and power supplies are covered, but technically are not as battery cells can be destroyed via a poor charge/discharge and power supply units can be destroyed with poor dirty mains surges and spikes. These are deemed as consumables and if reported to the manufacturer may be changed as a gesture of good will :)[/p][/quote]A very good analogy, unfortunately as you say the consumer tends to see PCs/Laptops as white goods. It's broke so I want a new one!.... I don't care who broke it I still want a new one!...):):):): Haven't been into PC World for a long time as I buy all my parts online, surprised to hear they have shut down their Tech Centre..... It used to set them apart from the others. Ah well, maybe they will go the Comet way? EU_OUT_NOW

5:28pm Sat 28 Dec 13

Strontium90 says...

No wonder this company has featured on consumer programs such as "Watchdog" so often, especially in relation to their expensive and unnecessary extended warranties. I buy everything from John Lewis who will always replace faulty goods without question.
No wonder this company has featured on consumer programs such as "Watchdog" so often, especially in relation to their expensive and unnecessary extended warranties. I buy everything from John Lewis who will always replace faulty goods without question. Strontium90

8:06am Sun 29 Dec 13

Andrew Turpie says...

kingofpop wrote:
Shouldn't matter what day of the year it is...they should still offer the same level of service! If you go out for a meal and order 20 minutes before service stops would it be acceptable to get less care taken with your meal? All yhese places are the same and do everything they can to avoid refunds....havent seen anyone post anything about a positive experience at pc world, which makes me think there must be a reason. Is it even legal for a store to sell an item, then refuse to refund/fix it and tell the consumer to go direct to the product maker?
A worst case scenario is yes, Customer gets message to create recovery media > Customer chooses to ignore request to create recovery media > Customer through own negligence destroys data on both the operating system and recovery partition > Customer expects retailer to host recovery media for every make and model of laptop ever built > Customer kicks off at manufacturer's £50 charge for recovery media that Microsoft insist for as it activates another OEM licence key > tech guy rants on phone at manufacturer trying his best to help customer > Manufacturer telling tech guy they will only deal direct with the customer on this issue, have a nice day "click" buzzz.
[quote][p][bold]kingofpop[/bold] wrote: Shouldn't matter what day of the year it is...they should still offer the same level of service! If you go out for a meal and order 20 minutes before service stops would it be acceptable to get less care taken with your meal? All yhese places are the same and do everything they can to avoid refunds....havent seen anyone post anything about a positive experience at pc world, which makes me think there must be a reason. Is it even legal for a store to sell an item, then refuse to refund/fix it and tell the consumer to go direct to the product maker?[/p][/quote]A worst case scenario is yes, Customer gets message to create recovery media > Customer chooses to ignore request to create recovery media > Customer through own negligence destroys data on both the operating system and recovery partition > Customer expects retailer to host recovery media for every make and model of laptop ever built > Customer kicks off at manufacturer's £50 charge for recovery media that Microsoft insist for as it activates another OEM licence key > tech guy rants on phone at manufacturer trying his best to help customer > Manufacturer telling tech guy they will only deal direct with the customer on this issue, have a nice day "click" buzzz. Andrew Turpie

8:14am Sun 29 Dec 13

Andrew Turpie says...

Strontium90 wrote:
No wonder this company has featured on consumer programs such as "Watchdog" so often, especially in relation to their expensive and unnecessary extended warranties. I buy everything from John Lewis who will always replace faulty goods without question.
Their "expensive" pc performance cover gave :

Unlimited data back up and OS recovery at £60 a time.
Unlimited data recovery via Kroll Ontrack system at £100 a time.
Annual health check at £30 a time.
Accidental damage for LCD screens around £150 a time.
Machine written off and replaced by a similar spec if not repaired with the agreed time.

Even this tightwad thought the above was reasonable at £7.99 a month.
But as I said, horses for courses and there was many customers who used it to its maximum potential..
[quote][p][bold]Strontium90[/bold] wrote: No wonder this company has featured on consumer programs such as "Watchdog" so often, especially in relation to their expensive and unnecessary extended warranties. I buy everything from John Lewis who will always replace faulty goods without question.[/p][/quote]Their "expensive" pc performance cover gave : Unlimited data back up and OS recovery at £60 a time. Unlimited data recovery via Kroll Ontrack system at £100 a time. Annual health check at £30 a time. Accidental damage for LCD screens around £150 a time. Machine written off and replaced by a similar spec if not repaired with the agreed time. Even this tightwad thought the above was reasonable at £7.99 a month. But as I said, horses for courses and there was many customers who used it to its maximum potential.. Andrew Turpie

9:04am Sun 29 Dec 13

Andrew Turpie says...

Some poster above said that their friends photos were deleted after a simple virus removal. I saw some machines that had in excess of 4000 system files infected and once removed and re started, failed to boot to desktop. Sometimes there is no such thing as a simple virus removal, each being a different case each time. As for deleted photos, company policy stated that we weren't to root through peoples drives due to DPA data protection act and that unless customer directed, only the generic windows libraries were allowed to be backed up. If some user created a folder on the root of the C: drive and dumped photos in there (some customers did tell me they did), then the chances are they would be missed.

I have heard in good faith, that the tech guy who found inappropriate images on a certain Glitters PC had to be let go because they were stashed out the way...?
Some poster above said that their friends photos were deleted after a simple virus removal. I saw some machines that had in excess of 4000 system files infected and once removed and re started, failed to boot to desktop. Sometimes there is no such thing as a simple virus removal, each being a different case each time. As for deleted photos, company policy stated that we weren't to root through peoples drives due to DPA data protection act and that unless customer directed, only the generic windows libraries were allowed to be backed up. If some user created a folder on the root of the C: drive and dumped photos in there (some customers did tell me they did), then the chances are they would be missed. I have heard in good faith, that the tech guy who found inappropriate images on a certain Glitters PC had to be let go because they were stashed out the way...? Andrew Turpie

11:17am Sun 29 Dec 13

Popeonarope says...

Andrew Turpie wrote:
Some poster above said that their friends photos were deleted after a simple virus removal. I saw some machines that had in excess of 4000 system files infected and once removed and re started, failed to boot to desktop. Sometimes there is no such thing as a simple virus removal, each being a different case each time. As for deleted photos, company policy stated that we weren't to root through peoples drives due to DPA data protection act and that unless customer directed, only the generic windows libraries were allowed to be backed up. If some user created a folder on the root of the C: drive and dumped photos in there (some customers did tell me they did), then the chances are they would be missed.

I have heard in good faith, that the tech guy who found inappropriate images on a certain Glitters PC had to be let go because they were stashed out the way...?
Removing a virus is not difficult, and should be a matter of routine for people who work on a technical desk. However, they didnt remove the virus in the usual way; they rebuilt the machine as a shortcut. This is a viable solution but deletes everything which can be recovered with recovery software; it is easier to prevent than to cure!
Yes, there are laws in place to protect the consumer, but a simple question of "is there anything on the laptop you want to keep?" would be prudent.
My MCSE was in Windows NT. Slightly redundant now but still useful to know when someone is trying to sell you something. I supported the John Lewis ES9000 mainframe transition to a client / server setup in the mid 90s and troubleshot more pcs than i care to remember.
I have not been in a PC World store in over six years so was unaware the Tech Guys were removed from the stores. I appreciate not all of them were useless, just the ones i dealt with.
Personally i dont have virus protection on any of my laptops or pcs. There is nothing on them that i would care if I lost as all data is backed up to a NAS regularly and im careful on what i sites i access.
I make a images for each computer that restores it to my own specification and when it needs rebuilding it takes
[quote][p][bold]Andrew Turpie[/bold] wrote: Some poster above said that their friends photos were deleted after a simple virus removal. I saw some machines that had in excess of 4000 system files infected and once removed and re started, failed to boot to desktop. Sometimes there is no such thing as a simple virus removal, each being a different case each time. As for deleted photos, company policy stated that we weren't to root through peoples drives due to DPA data protection act and that unless customer directed, only the generic windows libraries were allowed to be backed up. If some user created a folder on the root of the C: drive and dumped photos in there (some customers did tell me they did), then the chances are they would be missed. I have heard in good faith, that the tech guy who found inappropriate images on a certain Glitters PC had to be let go because they were stashed out the way...?[/p][/quote]Removing a virus is not difficult, and should be a matter of routine for people who work on a technical desk. However, they didnt remove the virus in the usual way; they rebuilt the machine as a shortcut. This is a viable solution but deletes everything which can be recovered with recovery software; it is easier to prevent than to cure! Yes, there are laws in place to protect the consumer, but a simple question of "is there anything on the laptop you want to keep?" would be prudent. My MCSE was in Windows NT. Slightly redundant now but still useful to know when someone is trying to sell you something. I supported the John Lewis ES9000 mainframe transition to a client / server setup in the mid 90s and troubleshot more pcs than i care to remember. I have not been in a PC World store in over six years so was unaware the Tech Guys were removed from the stores. I appreciate not all of them were useless, just the ones i dealt with. Personally i dont have virus protection on any of my laptops or pcs. There is nothing on them that i would care if I lost as all data is backed up to a NAS regularly and im careful on what i sites i access. I make a images for each computer that restores it to my own specification and when it needs rebuilding it takes Popeonarope

11:21am Sun 29 Dec 13

Popeonarope says...

less than 20 minutes.

(A four year old decided to click Post Comment before i have finished) hes far more trouble than any computer i have dealt with and more fun :o)
less than 20 minutes. (A four year old decided to click Post Comment before i have finished) hes far more trouble than any computer i have dealt with and more fun :o) Popeonarope

12:27pm Sun 29 Dec 13

Andrew Turpie says...

Popeonarope wrote:
Andrew Turpie wrote:
Some poster above said that their friends photos were deleted after a simple virus removal. I saw some machines that had in excess of 4000 system files infected and once removed and re started, failed to boot to desktop. Sometimes there is no such thing as a simple virus removal, each being a different case each time. As for deleted photos, company policy stated that we weren't to root through peoples drives due to DPA data protection act and that unless customer directed, only the generic windows libraries were allowed to be backed up. If some user created a folder on the root of the C: drive and dumped photos in there (some customers did tell me they did), then the chances are they would be missed.

I have heard in good faith, that the tech guy who found inappropriate images on a certain Glitters PC had to be let go because they were stashed out the way...?
Removing a virus is not difficult, and should be a matter of routine for people who work on a technical desk. However, they didnt remove the virus in the usual way; they rebuilt the machine as a shortcut. This is a viable solution but deletes everything which can be recovered with recovery software; it is easier to prevent than to cure!
Yes, there are laws in place to protect the consumer, but a simple question of "is there anything on the laptop you want to keep?" would be prudent.
My MCSE was in Windows NT. Slightly redundant now but still useful to know when someone is trying to sell you something. I supported the John Lewis ES9000 mainframe transition to a client / server setup in the mid 90s and troubleshot more pcs than i care to remember.
I have not been in a PC World store in over six years so was unaware the Tech Guys were removed from the stores. I appreciate not all of them were useless, just the ones i dealt with.
Personally i dont have virus protection on any of my laptops or pcs. There is nothing on them that i would care if I lost as all data is backed up to a NAS regularly and im careful on what i sites i access.
I make a images for each computer that restores it to my own specification and when it needs rebuilding it takes
Good to hear someone that has a robust backup plan, been through CompTIA A+ MCDST XP, MCSA 2003 and MCSE 2003, the A+ being the best for hardware support. Personally I use VMware OS snapshots now instead of HDD imaging as waiting around 15 mins to write the image back to the HDD made me an impatient PITA. Snapshots can now be fired up immediately and negates the need for anti virus. Try Oracles virtual box free as its open source. Granted needs a physical box with a bit of grunt but so much easier to work with.

I'm not here to ride in as the defender of DSGi as personally, I found some of the rules that head office enforced made tech jobs harder to perform and made some repairs more costly for the customer, I'm here as an ex employee to set some records straight, for instance, some chap earlier for example said that PCW didn't sell gaming PC's, well they did as before I left they sold Packard Bell iExtreme models which came with the top of the range Intel 775 processor, 6gb Ram, 2x NVIDIA PCI cards in SLI and a RAID 1 HDD configuration. As Dell resellers, they bought out Alienware at the time and started to load Alienware SKU codes onto the system.

Again was quite a few years back :)
[quote][p][bold]Popeonarope[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andrew Turpie[/bold] wrote: Some poster above said that their friends photos were deleted after a simple virus removal. I saw some machines that had in excess of 4000 system files infected and once removed and re started, failed to boot to desktop. Sometimes there is no such thing as a simple virus removal, each being a different case each time. As for deleted photos, company policy stated that we weren't to root through peoples drives due to DPA data protection act and that unless customer directed, only the generic windows libraries were allowed to be backed up. If some user created a folder on the root of the C: drive and dumped photos in there (some customers did tell me they did), then the chances are they would be missed. I have heard in good faith, that the tech guy who found inappropriate images on a certain Glitters PC had to be let go because they were stashed out the way...?[/p][/quote]Removing a virus is not difficult, and should be a matter of routine for people who work on a technical desk. However, they didnt remove the virus in the usual way; they rebuilt the machine as a shortcut. This is a viable solution but deletes everything which can be recovered with recovery software; it is easier to prevent than to cure! Yes, there are laws in place to protect the consumer, but a simple question of "is there anything on the laptop you want to keep?" would be prudent. My MCSE was in Windows NT. Slightly redundant now but still useful to know when someone is trying to sell you something. I supported the John Lewis ES9000 mainframe transition to a client / server setup in the mid 90s and troubleshot more pcs than i care to remember. I have not been in a PC World store in over six years so was unaware the Tech Guys were removed from the stores. I appreciate not all of them were useless, just the ones i dealt with. Personally i dont have virus protection on any of my laptops or pcs. There is nothing on them that i would care if I lost as all data is backed up to a NAS regularly and im careful on what i sites i access. I make a images for each computer that restores it to my own specification and when it needs rebuilding it takes[/p][/quote]Good to hear someone that has a robust backup plan, been through CompTIA A+ MCDST XP, MCSA 2003 and MCSE 2003, the A+ being the best for hardware support. Personally I use VMware OS snapshots now instead of HDD imaging as waiting around 15 mins to write the image back to the HDD made me an impatient PITA. Snapshots can now be fired up immediately and negates the need for anti virus. Try Oracles virtual box free as its open source. Granted needs a physical box with a bit of grunt but so much easier to work with. I'm not here to ride in as the defender of DSGi as personally, I found some of the rules that head office enforced made tech jobs harder to perform and made some repairs more costly for the customer, I'm here as an ex employee to set some records straight, for instance, some chap earlier for example said that PCW didn't sell gaming PC's, well they did as before I left they sold Packard Bell iExtreme models which came with the top of the range Intel 775 processor, 6gb Ram, 2x NVIDIA PCI cards in SLI and a RAID 1 HDD configuration. As Dell resellers, they bought out Alienware at the time and started to load Alienware SKU codes onto the system. Again was quite a few years back :) Andrew Turpie

12:30pm Sun 29 Dec 13

Andrew Turpie says...

Ah crud, sorry for the thumbs down popeonarope- viewing this on a smart phone and tried to thumbs up - should have pinched and zoomed lol.
Ah crud, sorry for the thumbs down popeonarope- viewing this on a smart phone and tried to thumbs up - should have pinched and zoomed lol. Andrew Turpie

1:36pm Sun 29 Dec 13

EU_OUT_NOW says...

Popeonarope says...

Removing a virus is not difficult, and should be a matter of routine for people who work on a technical desk. However, they didnt remove the virus in the usual way; they rebuilt the machine as a shortcut. This is a viable solution but deletes everything which can be recovered with recovery software; it is easier to prevent than to cure!
Yes, there are laws in place to protect the consumer, but a simple question of "is there anything on the laptop you want to keep?" would be prudent.
My MCSE was in Windows NT. Slightly redundant now but still useful to know when someone is trying to sell you something. I supported the John Lewis ES9000 mainframe transition to a client / server setup in the mid 90s and troubleshot more pcs than i care to remember.
I have not been in a PC World store in over six years so was unaware the Tech Guys were removed from the stores. I appreciate not all of them were useless, just the ones i dealt with.
Personally i dont have virus protection on any of my laptops or pcs. There is nothing on them that i would care if I lost as all data is backed up to a NAS regularly and im careful on what i sites i access.
I make a images for each computer that restores it to my own specification and when it needs rebuilding it takes...............
....................
.................

I wondered how long it would take one of the old school, Microsoft Certified System Engineer (MCSE) server boys to come on here and show off. Most people are normal end users and really don't know or want to know what you are talking about. Maintaining a server is a different ball game, you are also talking about an era that is out of date and beyond the bounds of most laptop users, understandably so! NAS (Network Assisted Storage) is not something we all have in our homes (Data recorders using DDS tapes?) "Removing a virus is not difficult?" Now that is a very ambiguous statement to make and depends on whether or not the person removing the virus is familiar with the Windows registry, most are not! Removing a single virus? most machines that come in for repair are riddled with registry errors. As Andrew Turpie mentioned, a fresh install of Windows is the most cost effective way of restoring the laptop/PC back to it's original status. IT'S NOT A SHORTCUT. The worst thing to ask the customer is, are there any files/folder you wish to save? It opens up a can of worms that ceases to be cost effective and is open to misunderstandings Cleaning off the hard drive and carrying out a fresh install is normal practice these days, wherever you go! Unless you find some aging techie nerd like me who is prepared to sit there for hours trying to recover the operating system and all files and folders. Unfortunately, an HDD clean and fresh install can take out data in the back up partition that has been in use since Widows Vista. So what is the answer? As we are now in the 21st century about to enter 2014 there are ways round loosing all your files/folders (without NAS) in the event of a total crash and the need for a fresh install. USB external hard drives or flash drives/memory sticks. Back up to an external device and keep it safe! (Do regular back ups). If you have loads of music and family photos then an external USB caddy/HDD is probably your best bet. To those of you who know this already, my apologies, my suggestion is merely to help those who don't. Finally, always use antivirus and a good registry cleaner that simply does it all for you is highly recommended! Happy New Year to you all, and remember BACK UP to an external device!
Popeonarope says... Removing a virus is not difficult, and should be a matter of routine for people who work on a technical desk. However, they didnt remove the virus in the usual way; they rebuilt the machine as a shortcut. This is a viable solution but deletes everything which can be recovered with recovery software; it is easier to prevent than to cure! Yes, there are laws in place to protect the consumer, but a simple question of "is there anything on the laptop you want to keep?" would be prudent. My MCSE was in Windows NT. Slightly redundant now but still useful to know when someone is trying to sell you something. I supported the John Lewis ES9000 mainframe transition to a client / server setup in the mid 90s and troubleshot more pcs than i care to remember. I have not been in a PC World store in over six years so was unaware the Tech Guys were removed from the stores. I appreciate not all of them were useless, just the ones i dealt with. Personally i dont have virus protection on any of my laptops or pcs. There is nothing on them that i would care if I lost as all data is backed up to a NAS regularly and im careful on what i sites i access. I make a images for each computer that restores it to my own specification and when it needs rebuilding it takes............... .................... ................. I wondered how long it would take one of the old school, Microsoft Certified System Engineer (MCSE) server boys to come on here and show off. Most people are normal end users and really don't know or want to know what you are talking about. Maintaining a server is a different ball game, you are also talking about an era that is out of date and beyond the bounds of most laptop users, understandably so! NAS (Network Assisted Storage) is not something we all have in our homes (Data recorders using DDS tapes?) "Removing a virus is not difficult?" Now that is a very ambiguous statement to make and depends on whether or not the person removing the virus is familiar with the Windows registry, most are not! Removing a single virus? most machines that come in for repair are riddled with registry errors. As Andrew Turpie mentioned, a fresh install of Windows is the most cost effective way of restoring the laptop/PC back to it's original status. IT'S NOT A SHORTCUT. The worst thing to ask the customer is, are there any files/folder you wish to save? It opens up a can of worms that ceases to be cost effective and is open to misunderstandings Cleaning off the hard drive and carrying out a fresh install is normal practice these days, wherever you go! Unless you find some aging techie nerd like me who is prepared to sit there for hours trying to recover the operating system and all files and folders. Unfortunately, an HDD clean and fresh install can take out data in the back up partition that has been in use since Widows Vista. So what is the answer? As we are now in the 21st century about to enter 2014 there are ways round loosing all your files/folders (without NAS) in the event of a total crash and the need for a fresh install. USB external hard drives or flash drives/memory sticks. Back up to an external device and keep it safe! (Do regular back ups). If you have loads of music and family photos then an external USB caddy/HDD is probably your best bet. To those of you who know this already, my apologies, my suggestion is merely to help those who don't. Finally, always use antivirus and a good registry cleaner that simply does it all for you is highly recommended! Happy New Year to you all, and remember BACK UP to an external device! EU_OUT_NOW

7:43pm Sun 29 Dec 13

gloryhornet4 says...

Simon_Watkins wrote:
gloryhornet4 wrote:
LSC wrote:
I agree 8th of January is too long. But expecting the Tech bods to be working on Boxing Day is a bit much. I'm not working today,and nor are most of the people reading this. I pity the generally unskilled shop staff who are made to because of the public's **** for a bargain.
It is Boxing day. I'm listening to Watford beat Millwall on the radio, eating Stilton and drinking Port. The commercial world is a long way from my mind.
LSC you are getting negative scores, but I think you are right.

Boxing day is to shift sales and many shops could not have a Danny S****U for returns getting in their way.

The day I hate most is 27 Dec. If I am working there is usually nowhere to get a sandwich so I need to go into the throngs of people taking back Danny they do not want or it does not fit, or I get no lunch.

Anyway - we have to accept that there will be a delay say until this Saturday to get a common sense answer from a shop on a problem like a PC. Little Johny or whatever can play with something else, it's not as if he is not spoilt without his PC I bet. 8 Jan is poor customer service and should not be tolerated. Not that from the description a repair should be accepted.

Hope you enjoyed the game. The woodwork got a peppering and there 2 more shouts for a penalty. 17 shots at goal and about 65% of the game. All we needed since October was to break out of walking pace when attacking and we are a threat again.
I'm sure traders would love to sell more and more new stock every day, not just Boxing Day, but it doesn't exempt them from their Sale of Goods Act *legal* responsibilities. Get real!
Simon,

I agree with you. Not saying they should side step their obligations. Just they do it through having half trained staff/poorly trained staff - at some stores that tarnish the rest.

As for get real - I advise on consumer and employment matters.
[quote][p][bold]Simon_Watkins[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gloryhornet4[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LSC[/bold] wrote: I agree 8th of January is too long. But expecting the Tech bods to be working on Boxing Day is a bit much. I'm not working today,and nor are most of the people reading this. I pity the generally unskilled shop staff who are made to because of the public's **** for a bargain. It is Boxing day. I'm listening to Watford beat Millwall on the radio, eating Stilton and drinking Port. The commercial world is a long way from my mind.[/p][/quote]LSC you are getting negative scores, but I think you are right. Boxing day is to shift sales and many shops could not have a Danny S****U for returns getting in their way. The day I hate most is 27 Dec. If I am working there is usually nowhere to get a sandwich so I need to go into the throngs of people taking back Danny they do not want or it does not fit, or I get no lunch. Anyway - we have to accept that there will be a delay say until this Saturday to get a common sense answer from a shop on a problem like a PC. Little Johny or whatever can play with something else, it's not as if he is not spoilt without his PC I bet. 8 Jan is poor customer service and should not be tolerated. Not that from the description a repair should be accepted. Hope you enjoyed the game. The woodwork got a peppering and there 2 more shouts for a penalty. 17 shots at goal and about 65% of the game. All we needed since October was to break out of walking pace when attacking and we are a threat again.[/p][/quote]I'm sure traders would love to sell more and more new stock every day, not just Boxing Day, but it doesn't exempt them from their Sale of Goods Act *legal* responsibilities. Get real![/p][/quote]Simon, I agree with you. Not saying they should side step their obligations. Just they do it through having half trained staff/poorly trained staff - at some stores that tarnish the rest. As for get real - I advise on consumer and employment matters. gloryhornet4

8:26pm Sun 29 Dec 13

EU_OUT_NOW says...

EU_OUT_NOW wrote:
LSC wrote:
l*u*s*t is a banned word? Wow, Auntie WO, I'll try to upset people by using that one again.
They can't ban that word? It's what makes the world go round and relationships FUN...)::):):):)
Score -5. Not bad, didn't know the people of Watford were such prudes.
[quote][p][bold]EU_OUT_NOW[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LSC[/bold] wrote: l*u*s*t is a banned word? Wow, Auntie WO, I'll try to upset people by using that one again.[/p][/quote]They can't ban that word? It's what makes the world go round and relationships FUN...)::):):):)[/p][/quote]Score -5. Not bad, didn't know the people of Watford were such prudes. EU_OUT_NOW

9:46pm Sun 29 Dec 13

Popeonarope says...

EU_OUT_NOW wrote:
Popeonarope says...

Removing a virus is not difficult, and should be a matter of routine for people who work on a technical desk. However, they didnt remove the virus in the usual way; they rebuilt the machine as a shortcut. This is a viable solution but deletes everything which can be recovered with recovery software; it is easier to prevent than to cure!
Yes, there are laws in place to protect the consumer, but a simple question of "is there anything on the laptop you want to keep?" would be prudent.
My MCSE was in Windows NT. Slightly redundant now but still useful to know when someone is trying to sell you something. I supported the John Lewis ES9000 mainframe transition to a client / server setup in the mid 90s and troubleshot more pcs than i care to remember.
I have not been in a PC World store in over six years so was unaware the Tech Guys were removed from the stores. I appreciate not all of them were useless, just the ones i dealt with.
Personally i dont have virus protection on any of my laptops or pcs. There is nothing on them that i would care if I lost as all data is backed up to a NAS regularly and im careful on what i sites i access.
I make a images for each computer that restores it to my own specification and when it needs rebuilding it takes...............

....................

.................

I wondered how long it would take one of the old school, Microsoft Certified System Engineer (MCSE) server boys to come on here and show off. Most people are normal end users and really don't know or want to know what you are talking about. Maintaining a server is a different ball game, you are also talking about an era that is out of date and beyond the bounds of most laptop users, understandably so! NAS (Network Assisted Storage) is not something we all have in our homes (Data recorders using DDS tapes?) "Removing a virus is not difficult?" Now that is a very ambiguous statement to make and depends on whether or not the person removing the virus is familiar with the Windows registry, most are not! Removing a single virus? most machines that come in for repair are riddled with registry errors. As Andrew Turpie mentioned, a fresh install of Windows is the most cost effective way of restoring the laptop/PC back to it's original status. IT'S NOT A SHORTCUT. The worst thing to ask the customer is, are there any files/folder you wish to save? It opens up a can of worms that ceases to be cost effective and is open to misunderstandings Cleaning off the hard drive and carrying out a fresh install is normal practice these days, wherever you go! Unless you find some aging techie nerd like me who is prepared to sit there for hours trying to recover the operating system and all files and folders. Unfortunately, an HDD clean and fresh install can take out data in the back up partition that has been in use since Widows Vista. So what is the answer? As we are now in the 21st century about to enter 2014 there are ways round loosing all your files/folders (without NAS) in the event of a total crash and the need for a fresh install. USB external hard drives or flash drives/memory sticks. Back up to an external device and keep it safe! (Do regular back ups). If you have loads of music and family photos then an external USB caddy/HDD is probably your best bet. To those of you who know this already, my apologies, my suggestion is merely to help those who don't. Finally, always use antivirus and a good registry cleaner that simply does it all for you is highly recommended! Happy New Year to you all, and remember BACK UP to an external device!
I didnt make any comment to show off, only to show i have a history in IT and know a bit about it. If i wanted to show off i would have mentioned my MCSE, BSc, MSc (Imperial College), BEng and many MS / Oracle certificates! :o) That said, i learnt the most in IT from someone who had no qualifications at all in the late 80s.
I agree most users would not have a clue on removing viruses and any related corruption. If you read it again i said "Removing a virus is not difficult, and should be a matter of routine for people who work on a technical desk".
People on a technical helpdesk should know how to remove viruses as standard and if that requires a rebuild, to check if there is any media the customer wants to keep before it is rebuilt. It is customer service that will go a long way to repair the reputation of a industry damaged by broken promises and under-trained support staff. Assuming the customers do not know how to restore their software it is not a unreasonable to assume they may not be literate enough to backup the data they require.
My professional IT experience was in the 90s and technology has evolved considerably now, both in architecture and software. Cloud technology, proxy advertising, big data and mass social media have changed the playing field and will continue to do so.
But the basics remain the same; PC World has never completed a service for me that was satisfactory. I took my business elsewhere as anyone else would do and will never bother them again.
This kid may be responsible for the fault, maybe not. PC World could rebuild the system in a couple of hours if they were geared up to do so. It just shows me they are still not interested in helping anyone; just in taking their money. The OP may as well have bought a PC from a market stall.
[quote][p][bold]EU_OUT_NOW[/bold] wrote: Popeonarope says... Removing a virus is not difficult, and should be a matter of routine for people who work on a technical desk. However, they didnt remove the virus in the usual way; they rebuilt the machine as a shortcut. This is a viable solution but deletes everything which can be recovered with recovery software; it is easier to prevent than to cure! Yes, there are laws in place to protect the consumer, but a simple question of "is there anything on the laptop you want to keep?" would be prudent. My MCSE was in Windows NT. Slightly redundant now but still useful to know when someone is trying to sell you something. I supported the John Lewis ES9000 mainframe transition to a client / server setup in the mid 90s and troubleshot more pcs than i care to remember. I have not been in a PC World store in over six years so was unaware the Tech Guys were removed from the stores. I appreciate not all of them were useless, just the ones i dealt with. Personally i dont have virus protection on any of my laptops or pcs. There is nothing on them that i would care if I lost as all data is backed up to a NAS regularly and im careful on what i sites i access. I make a images for each computer that restores it to my own specification and when it needs rebuilding it takes............... .................... ................. I wondered how long it would take one of the old school, Microsoft Certified System Engineer (MCSE) server boys to come on here and show off. Most people are normal end users and really don't know or want to know what you are talking about. Maintaining a server is a different ball game, you are also talking about an era that is out of date and beyond the bounds of most laptop users, understandably so! NAS (Network Assisted Storage) is not something we all have in our homes (Data recorders using DDS tapes?) "Removing a virus is not difficult?" Now that is a very ambiguous statement to make and depends on whether or not the person removing the virus is familiar with the Windows registry, most are not! Removing a single virus? most machines that come in for repair are riddled with registry errors. As Andrew Turpie mentioned, a fresh install of Windows is the most cost effective way of restoring the laptop/PC back to it's original status. IT'S NOT A SHORTCUT. The worst thing to ask the customer is, are there any files/folder you wish to save? It opens up a can of worms that ceases to be cost effective and is open to misunderstandings Cleaning off the hard drive and carrying out a fresh install is normal practice these days, wherever you go! Unless you find some aging techie nerd like me who is prepared to sit there for hours trying to recover the operating system and all files and folders. Unfortunately, an HDD clean and fresh install can take out data in the back up partition that has been in use since Widows Vista. So what is the answer? As we are now in the 21st century about to enter 2014 there are ways round loosing all your files/folders (without NAS) in the event of a total crash and the need for a fresh install. USB external hard drives or flash drives/memory sticks. Back up to an external device and keep it safe! (Do regular back ups). If you have loads of music and family photos then an external USB caddy/HDD is probably your best bet. To those of you who know this already, my apologies, my suggestion is merely to help those who don't. Finally, always use antivirus and a good registry cleaner that simply does it all for you is highly recommended! Happy New Year to you all, and remember BACK UP to an external device![/p][/quote]I didnt make any comment to show off, only to show i have a history in IT and know a bit about it. If i wanted to show off i would have mentioned my MCSE, BSc, MSc (Imperial College), BEng and many MS / Oracle certificates! :o) That said, i learnt the most in IT from someone who had no qualifications at all in the late 80s. I agree most users would not have a clue on removing viruses and any related corruption. If you read it again i said "Removing a virus is not difficult, and should be a matter of routine for people who work on a technical desk". People on a technical helpdesk should know how to remove viruses as standard and if that requires a rebuild, to check if there is any media the customer wants to keep before it is rebuilt. It is customer service that will go a long way to repair the reputation of a industry damaged by broken promises and under-trained support staff. Assuming the customers do not know how to restore their software it is not a unreasonable to assume they may not be literate enough to backup the data they require. My professional IT experience was in the 90s and technology has evolved considerably now, both in architecture and software. Cloud technology, proxy advertising, big data and mass social media have changed the playing field and will continue to do so. But the basics remain the same; PC World has never completed a service for me that was satisfactory. I took my business elsewhere as anyone else would do and will never bother them again. This kid may be responsible for the fault, maybe not. PC World could rebuild the system in a couple of hours if they were geared up to do so. It just shows me they are still not interested in helping anyone; just in taking their money. The OP may as well have bought a PC from a market stall. Popeonarope

4:39pm Wed 1 Jan 14

Dr Martin says...

LSC wrote:
"I'm sure traders would love to sell more and more new stock every day, not just Boxing Day, but it doesn't exempt them from their Sale of Goods Act *legal* responsibilities. Get real!"

The Sale of Goods Act isn't a catch-all get out of jail free card. Quite clearly the computer was working at the point of sale, so the shop is clear on the SaGA. IF the shop also sold the customer the game, then there might be a case, but it appears they didn't.
So we are out of the sale of Goods Act and into a Warranty issue anyway.
That being so, the shop has the right to investigate, especially as software, that I presume they did not recommend, had been added to the product.
If I put 25" wheels on my new car after I take it home, and then the rear axle falls off, it isn't the car salesman's fault unless I asked, and he assured me, the car could cope with 25" wheels from a certain supplier. If the car could cope with those wheels, the chances are it would be an optional extra anyway and the shop would have sold me them themselves to bump the price up.

Having said that, it is reasonable to expect a PC to have games installed, and it should be able to cope with that. But what game and from where?
It is only fair they find out. If it was from Pirate Bay and contained Malware, the shop has no responsibility whatsoever. For a £550 sale, they have every right to find that out.

There was a recent thing on 4Chan where someone asked how to speed up their PC, and some 'joker' replied that they should delete the system32 file. (Please do not do this folks). Apparently hundreds did though.
Presumably some of those hundreds were still under warranty; do you think they should get a free replacement?
http://www.southwale
sargus.co.uk/news/10
905742.More_than_100
_kids_are_caught_wit
h_cannabis_in_Gwent
Join in LSC
[quote][p][bold]LSC[/bold] wrote: "I'm sure traders would love to sell more and more new stock every day, not just Boxing Day, but it doesn't exempt them from their Sale of Goods Act *legal* responsibilities. Get real!" The Sale of Goods Act isn't a catch-all get out of jail free card. Quite clearly the computer was working at the point of sale, so the shop is clear on the SaGA. IF the shop also sold the customer the game, then there might be a case, but it appears they didn't. So we are out of the sale of Goods Act and into a Warranty issue anyway. That being so, the shop has the right to investigate, especially as software, that I presume they did not recommend, had been added to the product. If I put 25" wheels on my new car after I take it home, and then the rear axle falls off, it isn't the car salesman's fault unless I asked, and he assured me, the car could cope with 25" wheels from a certain supplier. If the car could cope with those wheels, the chances are it would be an optional extra anyway and the shop would have sold me them themselves to bump the price up. Having said that, it is reasonable to expect a PC to have games installed, and it should be able to cope with that. But what game and from where? It is only fair they find out. If it was from Pirate Bay and contained Malware, the shop has no responsibility whatsoever. For a £550 sale, they have every right to find that out. There was a recent thing on 4Chan where someone asked how to speed up their PC, and some 'joker' replied that they should delete the system32 file. (Please do not do this folks). Apparently hundreds did though. Presumably some of those hundreds were still under warranty; do you think they should get a free replacement?[/p][/quote]http://www.southwale sargus.co.uk/news/10 905742.More_than_100 _kids_are_caught_wit h_cannabis_in_Gwent Join in LSC Dr Martin

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