Flooding forces road closures across Hertfordshire

Lower High Street in Watford earlier. Picture by @JamPond

Lower High Street in Watford earlier. Picture by @JamPond

First published in News
Last updated

An update on road closures across Hertfordshire issued by the county council at 1.10pm 

Dacorum, Three Rivers & Watford

A411 Lower High Street Watford Road Closure still required

Water Lane, Watford Road Closure still required

Park Road, Rickmansworth Road Closure still required

Green Street, Chorleywood Road Closure still required

Moor Lane, Rickmansworth Fire and rescue report on gold command call

St Albans, Hertsmere & Welwyn Hatfield

Coopers Green Lane, Hatfield Road Closure still required

Colney Heath Lane, Closure still required

Sandpit Lane, St Albans Road Closure still required

Coopers Green Lane, Closure still required

Mackerye End, Harpenden Road Closure still required

Water End Lane, Wheathampstead Road Closure still required

Bushey Hall Road, Bushey Road Closed

East Herts & Broxbourne

B181 Roydon Road, Stanstead Abbotts Road Closure still required

B158 Lower Hatfield Road, Essendon Road Closure still required

Beane Road, Hertford Road Closure still required

St Marys Lane, Hertford Road Closure still required

Horns Mills Lane, Hertford Road Closure still required

Warren Lane, Braughing - Land slide Road Closed – Tree Surgeon and Works Crew trying to clear

North Herts & Stevenage

Old Knebworth Lane, Stevenage Road Closure still required

Comments (5)

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9:42am Sun 9 Feb 14

theguitarman says...

Good information.

Just one thing, can anyone explain what "Moor Lane, Rickmansworth Fire and rescue report on gold command call " means ?

This is job techno speak which mere mortals like the rest of us no understand !
Good information. Just one thing, can anyone explain what "Moor Lane, Rickmansworth Fire and rescue report on gold command call " means ? This is job techno speak which mere mortals like the rest of us no understand ! theguitarman
  • Score: 0

10:35am Sun 9 Feb 14

cgpc Rob says...

Scots Hill/Park Road closed, lots of traffic going down SH turning around and coming back up the hill, simple sign stating Road Closed, open to local traffic only access!

would Help.
Scots Hill/Park Road closed, lots of traffic going down SH turning around and coming back up the hill, simple sign stating Road Closed, open to local traffic only access! would Help. cgpc Rob
  • Score: 0

12:03pm Sun 9 Feb 14

Reader (R) says...

theguitarman wrote:
Good information.

Just one thing, can anyone explain what "Moor Lane, Rickmansworth Fire and rescue report on gold command call " means ?

This is job techno speak which mere mortals like the rest of us no understand !
Gold

The Gold Commander is in overall control of his or her organisation's resources at the incident. This person will not be on site, but at a distant control room, Gold Command, where he or she will formulate the strategy for dealing with the incident. If the Gold Commanders for various organisations at an incident are not collocated, they will be in constant touch with each other by videoconference or telephone.
The CCA requires police to host and chair the multi agency gold command. This responsibility will usually fall to the Local Chief Constable or their nominated deputy.
Silver

The Silver Commander is the tactical commander who manages tactical implementation following the strategic direction given by Gold and makes it into sets of actions that are completed by Bronze. Depending on the organisation. They may or not be at scene. Fire tend to be, police tend not to be. However this is a dynamic decision. Other organisations make their own decisions although many are encouraged to attend or send a representative to the police led multi agency silver command as detailed in the CCA.
This could be located in a. command vehicle at or near the scene or a remote building such as the police hq. There is a common misconception that all blue light services share one big control room and emergency control centre. This is generally not the case.
This role is often not strictly rank-related but does often fall to senior officers as opposed to constables or sergeants.
Bronze

A Bronze Commander directly controls an organisation's resources at the incident and will be found with their staff working at the scene. A commander or representative from each involved responder will be present and take direction from their organisation with the overall effort generally coordinated by the police.
A common misconception is that the Fire service are in charge at a fire incident. This is not the case since the amendments to the fire act and introduction of generic incident management procedures in the CCA 2004. They do control all actions within the inner cordon. The hot zone is theirs to work within. The forward command post or vehicle will be located outside of the hot zone and is where the bronze command group will assemble, co ordinated by the police.
It is worth bearing in mind for clarity that agencies do not instruct each other how to carry out their role. Ie police do not tell fire how to tackle the fire, they concentrate on results and implications. Similarly fire will never tell ambulance how to treat casualties etc. etc.
If an incident is widespread geographically, different Bronzes may assume responsibility for different locations. If the incident is of a complex nature, as is often the case, different Bronzes are given their own tasks or responsibilities at an incident, for example taking statements, cordon management, or survivor management.
[quote][p][bold]theguitarman[/bold] wrote: Good information. Just one thing, can anyone explain what "Moor Lane, Rickmansworth Fire and rescue report on gold command call " means ? This is job techno speak which mere mortals like the rest of us no understand ![/p][/quote]Gold[edit] The Gold Commander is in overall control of his or her organisation's resources at the incident. This person will not be on site, but at a distant control room, Gold Command, where he or she will formulate the strategy for dealing with the incident. If the Gold Commanders for various organisations at an incident are not collocated, they will be in constant touch with each other by videoconference or telephone. The CCA requires police to host and chair the multi agency gold command. This responsibility will usually fall to the Local Chief Constable or their nominated deputy. Silver[edit] The Silver Commander is the tactical commander who manages tactical implementation following the strategic direction given by Gold and makes it into sets of actions that are completed by Bronze. Depending on the organisation. They may or not be at scene. Fire tend to be, police tend not to be. However this is a dynamic decision. Other organisations make their own decisions although many are encouraged to attend or send a representative to the police led multi agency silver command as detailed in the CCA. This could be located in a. command vehicle at or near the scene or a remote building such as the police hq. There is a common misconception that all blue light services share one big control room and emergency control centre. This is generally not the case. This role is often not strictly rank-related but does often fall to senior officers as opposed to constables or sergeants. Bronze[edit] A Bronze Commander directly controls an organisation's resources at the incident and will be found with their staff working at the scene. A commander or representative from each involved responder will be present and take direction from their organisation with the overall effort generally coordinated by the police. A common misconception is that the Fire service are in charge at a fire incident. This is not the case since the amendments to the fire act and introduction of generic incident management procedures in the CCA 2004. They do control all actions within the inner cordon. The hot zone is theirs to work within. The forward command post or vehicle will be located outside of the hot zone and is where the bronze command group will assemble, co ordinated by the police. It is worth bearing in mind for clarity that agencies do not instruct each other how to carry out their role. Ie police do not tell fire how to tackle the fire, they concentrate on results and implications. Similarly fire will never tell ambulance how to treat casualties etc. etc. If an incident is widespread geographically, different Bronzes may assume responsibility for different locations. If the incident is of a complex nature, as is often the case, different Bronzes are given their own tasks or responsibilities at an incident, for example taking statements, cordon management, or survivor management. Reader (R)
  • Score: 2

1:13pm Sun 9 Feb 14

theguitarman says...

Reader (R) wrote:
theguitarman wrote:
Good information.

Just one thing, can anyone explain what "Moor Lane, Rickmansworth Fire and rescue report on gold command call " means ?

This is job techno speak which mere mortals like the rest of us no understand !
Gold

The Gold Commander is in overall control of his or her organisation's resources at the incident. This person will not be on site, but at a distant control room, Gold Command, where he or she will formulate the strategy for dealing with the incident. If the Gold Commanders for various organisations at an incident are not collocated, they will be in constant touch with each other by videoconference or telephone.
The CCA requires police to host and chair the multi agency gold command. This responsibility will usually fall to the Local Chief Constable or their nominated deputy.
Silver

The Silver Commander is the tactical commander who manages tactical implementation following the strategic direction given by Gold and makes it into sets of actions that are completed by Bronze. Depending on the organisation. They may or not be at scene. Fire tend to be, police tend not to be. However this is a dynamic decision. Other organisations make their own decisions although many are encouraged to attend or send a representative to the police led multi agency silver command as detailed in the CCA.
This could be located in a. command vehicle at or near the scene or a remote building such as the police hq. There is a common misconception that all blue light services share one big control room and emergency control centre. This is generally not the case.
This role is often not strictly rank-related but does often fall to senior officers as opposed to constables or sergeants.
Bronze

A Bronze Commander directly controls an organisation's resources at the incident and will be found with their staff working at the scene. A commander or representative from each involved responder will be present and take direction from their organisation with the overall effort generally coordinated by the police.
A common misconception is that the Fire service are in charge at a fire incident. This is not the case since the amendments to the fire act and introduction of generic incident management procedures in the CCA 2004. They do control all actions within the inner cordon. The hot zone is theirs to work within. The forward command post or vehicle will be located outside of the hot zone and is where the bronze command group will assemble, co ordinated by the police.
It is worth bearing in mind for clarity that agencies do not instruct each other how to carry out their role. Ie police do not tell fire how to tackle the fire, they concentrate on results and implications. Similarly fire will never tell ambulance how to treat casualties etc. etc.
If an incident is widespread geographically, different Bronzes may assume responsibility for different locations. If the incident is of a complex nature, as is often the case, different Bronzes are given their own tasks or responsibilities at an incident, for example taking statements, cordon management, or survivor management.
Thanks, great explanation.
[quote][p][bold]Reader (R)[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]theguitarman[/bold] wrote: Good information. Just one thing, can anyone explain what "Moor Lane, Rickmansworth Fire and rescue report on gold command call " means ? This is job techno speak which mere mortals like the rest of us no understand ![/p][/quote]Gold[edit] The Gold Commander is in overall control of his or her organisation's resources at the incident. This person will not be on site, but at a distant control room, Gold Command, where he or she will formulate the strategy for dealing with the incident. If the Gold Commanders for various organisations at an incident are not collocated, they will be in constant touch with each other by videoconference or telephone. The CCA requires police to host and chair the multi agency gold command. This responsibility will usually fall to the Local Chief Constable or their nominated deputy. Silver[edit] The Silver Commander is the tactical commander who manages tactical implementation following the strategic direction given by Gold and makes it into sets of actions that are completed by Bronze. Depending on the organisation. They may or not be at scene. Fire tend to be, police tend not to be. However this is a dynamic decision. Other organisations make their own decisions although many are encouraged to attend or send a representative to the police led multi agency silver command as detailed in the CCA. This could be located in a. command vehicle at or near the scene or a remote building such as the police hq. There is a common misconception that all blue light services share one big control room and emergency control centre. This is generally not the case. This role is often not strictly rank-related but does often fall to senior officers as opposed to constables or sergeants. Bronze[edit] A Bronze Commander directly controls an organisation's resources at the incident and will be found with their staff working at the scene. A commander or representative from each involved responder will be present and take direction from their organisation with the overall effort generally coordinated by the police. A common misconception is that the Fire service are in charge at a fire incident. This is not the case since the amendments to the fire act and introduction of generic incident management procedures in the CCA 2004. They do control all actions within the inner cordon. The hot zone is theirs to work within. The forward command post or vehicle will be located outside of the hot zone and is where the bronze command group will assemble, co ordinated by the police. It is worth bearing in mind for clarity that agencies do not instruct each other how to carry out their role. Ie police do not tell fire how to tackle the fire, they concentrate on results and implications. Similarly fire will never tell ambulance how to treat casualties etc. etc. If an incident is widespread geographically, different Bronzes may assume responsibility for different locations. If the incident is of a complex nature, as is often the case, different Bronzes are given their own tasks or responsibilities at an incident, for example taking statements, cordon management, or survivor management.[/p][/quote]Thanks, great explanation. theguitarman
  • Score: 0

8:33pm Sun 9 Feb 14

Maclanx says...

Thanks, was wondering the same thing
Thanks, was wondering the same thing Maclanx
  • Score: 0

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