Fire fighters called to locked-out resident in South Oxhey

Fire fighters rescue locked-out resident

Fire fighters rescue locked-out resident

First published in News Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author by , Senior Reporter

Firefighters were called to South Oxhey this morning after a person got locked out of their property.

A crew from Watford attended the Hamilton Road house after receiving reports at 5.14am that a  resident became locked out of their house.

Firefighters helped the resident gain entry to the house.

Comments (29)

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4:28pm Fri 28 Feb 14

Hornets number 12 fan says...

What complete waste of an Emergency Service!!!!
What complete waste of an Emergency Service!!!! Hornets number 12 fan
  • Score: 7

6:30pm Fri 28 Feb 14

looneytoone says...

Absolutely ridiculous! That's what locksmiths are for....but then again, they're not free are they!? Fire Service should send a bill to the homeowner!
Absolutely ridiculous! That's what locksmiths are for....but then again, they're not free are they!? Fire Service should send a bill to the homeowner! looneytoone
  • Score: 7

7:28pm Fri 28 Feb 14

gasguzzler says...

More productive than sitting on there backsides in the station !
More productive than sitting on there backsides in the station ! gasguzzler
  • Score: -4

7:55pm Fri 28 Feb 14

Nascot says...

gasguzzler wrote:
More productive than sitting on there backsides in the station !
Stupid comment from someone who is clearly so dense they cannot even spell 'their' correctly.
[quote][p][bold]gasguzzler[/bold] wrote: More productive than sitting on there backsides in the station ![/p][/quote]Stupid comment from someone who is clearly so dense they cannot even spell 'their' correctly. Nascot
  • Score: 0

8:07pm Fri 28 Feb 14

gasguzzler says...

Nascot wrote:
gasguzzler wrote:
More productive than sitting on there backsides in the station !
Stupid comment from someone who is clearly so dense they cannot even spell 'their' correctly.
Thanks for the English lesson and insults.
That aside I still believe I've got a good point.I
[quote][p][bold]Nascot[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]gasguzzler[/bold] wrote: More productive than sitting on there backsides in the station ![/p][/quote]Stupid comment from someone who is clearly so dense they cannot even spell 'their' correctly.[/p][/quote]Thanks for the English lesson and insults. That aside I still believe I've got a good point.I gasguzzler
  • Score: 1

9:44pm Fri 28 Feb 14

Hairy Hornet says...

i blame the fire service for responding to the call. I would have given them the number of a 24 hour locksmith. Would attendance have compromised their ability to respond to a real emergency?
i blame the fire service for responding to the call. I would have given them the number of a 24 hour locksmith. Would attendance have compromised their ability to respond to a real emergency? Hairy Hornet
  • Score: 3

9:49pm Fri 28 Feb 14

Retlas says...

Perhaps leave a key with a trusted neighbour or relative?
Perhaps leave a key with a trusted neighbour or relative? Retlas
  • Score: 3

11:15am Sat 1 Mar 14

LocalBoy1 says...

And how much did that cost the tax payer? Will the resident pay the bill? A locksmith would have been more appropriate. Why do the EMERGENCY fire service accept these ridiculous calls.
And how much did that cost the tax payer? Will the resident pay the bill? A locksmith would have been more appropriate. Why do the EMERGENCY fire service accept these ridiculous calls. LocalBoy1
  • Score: 1

4:44pm Sat 1 Mar 14

LSC says...

LocalBoy1 wrote:
And how much did that cost the tax payer? Will the resident pay the bill? A locksmith would have been more appropriate. Why do the EMERGENCY fire service accept these ridiculous calls.
To be honest, just a bit of diesel, unless it happened around a shift change time and the fire fighters went into overtime.
It does seem ridiculous on one level, but on the bright side it was more practice at responding, finding an address in a hurry, judging traffic, working as a team and so on.
My first reaction was with most of the other comments above, and I see no harm in billing the person who called, about the price a locksmith would charge.
[quote][p][bold]LocalBoy1[/bold] wrote: And how much did that cost the tax payer? Will the resident pay the bill? A locksmith would have been more appropriate. Why do the EMERGENCY fire service accept these ridiculous calls.[/p][/quote]To be honest, just a bit of diesel, unless it happened around a shift change time and the fire fighters went into overtime. It does seem ridiculous on one level, but on the bright side it was more practice at responding, finding an address in a hurry, judging traffic, working as a team and so on. My first reaction was with most of the other comments above, and I see no harm in billing the person who called, about the price a locksmith would charge. LSC
  • Score: -2

8:23pm Sat 1 Mar 14

LocalBoy1 says...

LSC wrote:
LocalBoy1 wrote:
And how much did that cost the tax payer? Will the resident pay the bill? A locksmith would have been more appropriate. Why do the EMERGENCY fire service accept these ridiculous calls.
To be honest, just a bit of diesel, unless it happened around a shift change time and the fire fighters went into overtime.
It does seem ridiculous on one level, but on the bright side it was more practice at responding, finding an address in a hurry, judging traffic, working as a team and so on.
My first reaction was with most of the other comments above, and I see no harm in billing the person who called, about the price a locksmith would charge.
To be honest just a bit of diesel?......... Have you any idea how much it costs to call out a fire crew?.. "Calling out the fire brigade will now cost £400+ per hour" (Telegraph) These are rates quoted for 2012.

Anyone dialling 999, and requesting a service for a non life-threatening situation, will be informed that they will be expected to cover the call-out and attendance costs. This will start at £412.80 an hour per appliance or specialist vehicle, including VAT.

The sort of incidents for which the force will be charging include pumping flood water from homes and rescuing livestock and pets.

Other situations that will no longer be covered free include attending homes when people have been LOCKED OUT which the service says should not be its responsibility.

The only way the fire service may cover the call out cost, is if it is considered to be life threatening!. So she may get away with it. I do hope she has learned her lesson "this time" (Telegraph article 2012. Charges being imposed by West Midlands Fire Service) I wonder what Watford will charge?
[quote][p][bold]LSC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LocalBoy1[/bold] wrote: And how much did that cost the tax payer? Will the resident pay the bill? A locksmith would have been more appropriate. Why do the EMERGENCY fire service accept these ridiculous calls.[/p][/quote]To be honest, just a bit of diesel, unless it happened around a shift change time and the fire fighters went into overtime. It does seem ridiculous on one level, but on the bright side it was more practice at responding, finding an address in a hurry, judging traffic, working as a team and so on. My first reaction was with most of the other comments above, and I see no harm in billing the person who called, about the price a locksmith would charge.[/p][/quote]To be honest just a bit of diesel?......... Have you any idea how much it costs to call out a fire crew?.. "Calling out the fire brigade will now cost £400+ per hour" (Telegraph) These are rates quoted for 2012. Anyone dialling 999, and requesting a service for a non life-threatening situation, will be informed that they will be expected to cover the call-out and attendance costs. This will start at £412.80 an hour per appliance or specialist vehicle, including VAT. The sort of incidents for which the force will be charging include pumping flood water from homes and rescuing livestock and pets. Other situations that will no longer be covered free include attending homes when people have been LOCKED OUT which the service says should not be its responsibility. The only way the fire service may cover the call out cost, is if it is considered to be life threatening!. So she may get away with it. I do hope she has learned her lesson "this time" (Telegraph article 2012. Charges being imposed by West Midlands Fire Service) I wonder what Watford will charge? LocalBoy1
  • Score: -1

12:55am Sun 2 Mar 14

LSC says...

"To be honest just a bit of diesel?......... Have you any idea how much it costs to call out a fire crew?.. "Calling out the fire brigade will now cost £400+ per hour" (Telegraph) These are rates quoted for 2012. "

I don't know how they arrive at these figures. We pay the dispatchers anyway, busy or not. We pay the fire crew anyway, busy or not. We already bought the fire station and the fire engines.
I totally agree that these stupid calls by stupid people should be discouraged.
But I don't see £400+ in costs that weren't already there.
To make a proper comparison, how much does Watford Fire Station cost per night when there are no actual call outs?
At a guess, and it is a real guess, there must be about 10 firefighters, 4 or 5 dispatchers, a handfull of cleaners and maintanence staff, their bins are emptied and the place is lit and heated. They have to eat and the sewage has to be dealt with. Frequently the fire appliances, pumps, ladders, jaws of life etc need servicing and they cost more than a Ford Focus.

I'd call that near £400 an hour without them doing anything at all.
"To be honest just a bit of diesel?......... Have you any idea how much it costs to call out a fire crew?.. "Calling out the fire brigade will now cost £400+ per hour" (Telegraph) These are rates quoted for 2012. " I don't know how they arrive at these figures. We pay the dispatchers anyway, busy or not. We pay the fire crew anyway, busy or not. We already bought the fire station and the fire engines. I totally agree that these stupid calls by stupid people should be discouraged. But I don't see £400+ in costs that weren't already there. To make a proper comparison, how much does Watford Fire Station cost per night when there are no actual call outs? At a guess, and it is a real guess, there must be about 10 firefighters, 4 or 5 dispatchers, a handfull of cleaners and maintanence staff, their bins are emptied and the place is lit and heated. They have to eat and the sewage has to be dealt with. Frequently the fire appliances, pumps, ladders, jaws of life etc need servicing and they cost more than a Ford Focus. I'd call that near £400 an hour without them doing anything at all. LSC
  • Score: 2

1:06am Sun 2 Mar 14

LSC says...

I'll also add, I worked for a firm supplying Vauxhall up in Luton. When the Vectra was coming off the line, at the rate of one per minute, they reserved the right to charge us up to £10,000 A MINUTE if our product caused a line stop. Because that is how much a factory costs to stand around. I'm pleased to say it never happened on my watch, but £400 per hour for a 24 hour facility with employees?

Peanuts.
I'll also add, I worked for a firm supplying Vauxhall up in Luton. When the Vectra was coming off the line, at the rate of one per minute, they reserved the right to charge us up to £10,000 A MINUTE if our product caused a line stop. Because that is how much a factory costs to stand around. I'm pleased to say it never happened on my watch, but £400 per hour for a 24 hour facility with employees? Peanuts. LSC
  • Score: 0

11:33am Sun 2 Mar 14

LocalBoy1 says...

LSC wrote:
I'll also add, I worked for a firm supplying Vauxhall up in Luton. When the Vectra was coming off the line, at the rate of one per minute, they reserved the right to charge us up to £10,000 A MINUTE if our product caused a line stop. Because that is how much a factory costs to stand around. I'm pleased to say it never happened on my watch, but £400 per hour for a 24 hour facility with employees?

Peanuts.
I am not sure what your point is?? although I'm sure you have one?? I will let this topic go at this point, because I know you of old LSC on the WO... and it will just go on and on.. So bye for now on this topic.. have a nice weekend..
[quote][p][bold]LSC[/bold] wrote: I'll also add, I worked for a firm supplying Vauxhall up in Luton. When the Vectra was coming off the line, at the rate of one per minute, they reserved the right to charge us up to £10,000 A MINUTE if our product caused a line stop. Because that is how much a factory costs to stand around. I'm pleased to say it never happened on my watch, but £400 per hour for a 24 hour facility with employees? Peanuts.[/p][/quote]I am not sure what your point is?? although I'm sure you have one?? I will let this topic go at this point, because I know you of old LSC on the WO... and it will just go on and on.. So bye for now on this topic.. have a nice weekend.. LocalBoy1
  • Score: 0

9:12am Mon 3 Mar 14

garston tony says...

Unless there is an actual emergency element to the situation (there was another lock out earlier that day were a baby was alone in the house) no the Fire Brigade are not the people that should be attending. IF they do attend ('emergency' or not) then they should charge the full £400ph for their time, people will soon realise a lock smith would be the better option.

As to the £400ph figure I agree that is mostly going to made up of costs that are incurred if they are called out or not
Unless there is an actual emergency element to the situation (there was another lock out earlier that day were a baby was alone in the house) no the Fire Brigade are not the people that should be attending. IF they do attend ('emergency' or not) then they should charge the full £400ph for their time, people will soon realise a lock smith would be the better option. As to the £400ph figure I agree that is mostly going to made up of costs that are incurred if they are called out or not garston tony
  • Score: 0

6:06pm Mon 3 Mar 14

LocalBoy1 says...

garston tony wrote:
Unless there is an actual emergency element to the situation (there was another lock out earlier that day were a baby was alone in the house) no the Fire Brigade are not the people that should be attending. IF they do attend ('emergency' or not) then they should charge the full £400ph for their time, people will soon realise a lock smith would be the better option.

As to the £400ph figure I agree that is mostly going to made up of costs that are incurred if they are called out or not
I think you may find that the costs for a fire unit and staff on standby and the costs for a fire unit and staff on call are evaluated at two quite different hourly rates.
[quote][p][bold]garston tony[/bold] wrote: Unless there is an actual emergency element to the situation (there was another lock out earlier that day were a baby was alone in the house) no the Fire Brigade are not the people that should be attending. IF they do attend ('emergency' or not) then they should charge the full £400ph for their time, people will soon realise a lock smith would be the better option. As to the £400ph figure I agree that is mostly going to made up of costs that are incurred if they are called out or not[/p][/quote]I think you may find that the costs for a fire unit and staff on standby and the costs for a fire unit and staff on call are evaluated at two quite different hourly rates. LocalBoy1
  • Score: 0

9:20pm Mon 3 Mar 14

LSC says...

LocalBoy1 wrote:
garston tony wrote:
Unless there is an actual emergency element to the situation (there was another lock out earlier that day were a baby was alone in the house) no the Fire Brigade are not the people that should be attending. IF they do attend ('emergency' or not) then they should charge the full £400ph for their time, people will soon realise a lock smith would be the better option.

As to the £400ph figure I agree that is mostly going to made up of costs that are incurred if they are called out or not
I think you may find that the costs for a fire unit and staff on standby and the costs for a fire unit and staff on call are evaluated at two quite different hourly rates.
You might be right, I confess I don't know. But it would seem somewhat bizarre. Are you telling me that firefighters receive a basic wage but a bonus if they actually have to do any work? They aren't bankers.
[quote][p][bold]LocalBoy1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]garston tony[/bold] wrote: Unless there is an actual emergency element to the situation (there was another lock out earlier that day were a baby was alone in the house) no the Fire Brigade are not the people that should be attending. IF they do attend ('emergency' or not) then they should charge the full £400ph for their time, people will soon realise a lock smith would be the better option. As to the £400ph figure I agree that is mostly going to made up of costs that are incurred if they are called out or not[/p][/quote]I think you may find that the costs for a fire unit and staff on standby and the costs for a fire unit and staff on call are evaluated at two quite different hourly rates.[/p][/quote]You might be right, I confess I don't know. But it would seem somewhat bizarre. Are you telling me that firefighters receive a basic wage but a bonus if they actually have to do any work? They aren't bankers. LSC
  • Score: 0

1:17pm Tue 4 Mar 14

LocalBoy1 says...

LSC wrote:
LocalBoy1 wrote:
garston tony wrote:
Unless there is an actual emergency element to the situation (there was another lock out earlier that day were a baby was alone in the house) no the Fire Brigade are not the people that should be attending. IF they do attend ('emergency' or not) then they should charge the full £400ph for their time, people will soon realise a lock smith would be the better option.

As to the £400ph figure I agree that is mostly going to made up of costs that are incurred if they are called out or not
I think you may find that the costs for a fire unit and staff on standby and the costs for a fire unit and staff on call are evaluated at two quite different hourly rates.
You might be right, I confess I don't know. But it would seem somewhat bizarre. Are you telling me that firefighters receive a basic wage but a bonus if they actually have to do any work? They aren't bankers.
You have missed the point completely. Try to look outside the box!. I am talking about costing's, standby v call out/active duty. costing's paid for by the tax payer!. You somehow have misinterpreted that as wages plus bonus for the staff. I give up again LSC...
[quote][p][bold]LSC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LocalBoy1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]garston tony[/bold] wrote: Unless there is an actual emergency element to the situation (there was another lock out earlier that day were a baby was alone in the house) no the Fire Brigade are not the people that should be attending. IF they do attend ('emergency' or not) then they should charge the full £400ph for their time, people will soon realise a lock smith would be the better option. As to the £400ph figure I agree that is mostly going to made up of costs that are incurred if they are called out or not[/p][/quote]I think you may find that the costs for a fire unit and staff on standby and the costs for a fire unit and staff on call are evaluated at two quite different hourly rates.[/p][/quote]You might be right, I confess I don't know. But it would seem somewhat bizarre. Are you telling me that firefighters receive a basic wage but a bonus if they actually have to do any work? They aren't bankers.[/p][/quote]You have missed the point completely. Try to look outside the box!. I am talking about costing's, standby v call out/active duty. costing's paid for by the tax payer!. You somehow have misinterpreted that as wages plus bonus for the staff. I give up again LSC... LocalBoy1
  • Score: 0

2:12pm Tue 4 Mar 14

LSC says...

LocalBoy1, I hold my hands up, as I try to do when I am wrong. I was not aware that they were paid more to actually go out and fight fires etc. I assumed they were on a flat rate. Apparently I'm wrong, so I withdraw my argument.
LocalBoy1, I hold my hands up, as I try to do when I am wrong. I was not aware that they were paid more to actually go out and fight fires etc. I assumed they were on a flat rate. Apparently I'm wrong, so I withdraw my argument. LSC
  • Score: 0

2:49pm Tue 4 Mar 14

LocalBoy1 says...

LSC wrote:
LocalBoy1, I hold my hands up, as I try to do when I am wrong. I was not aware that they were paid more to actually go out and fight fires etc. I assumed they were on a flat rate. Apparently I'm wrong, so I withdraw my argument.
I am talking about gross/net running costs of a fire unit + staff on station standby v cost of fire unit + staff on an active call. You however, are basing your whole debate on pay??? I totally give up!
[quote][p][bold]LSC[/bold] wrote: LocalBoy1, I hold my hands up, as I try to do when I am wrong. I was not aware that they were paid more to actually go out and fight fires etc. I assumed they were on a flat rate. Apparently I'm wrong, so I withdraw my argument.[/p][/quote]I am talking about gross/net running costs of a fire unit + staff on station standby v cost of fire unit + staff on an active call. You however, are basing your whole debate on pay??? I totally give up! LocalBoy1
  • Score: 0

2:52pm Tue 4 Mar 14

garston tony says...

I'm with LSC, I wasnt aware - if that is indeed the case - that firemen received a 'bonus' whenever they are called out.

To be fair our assumption was a fair one to make dont you think? But I note you use the word 'evaluate' which makes me think that in reality LSC and I may be right that the actual cost to the fire brigade of a crew on call isnt actually that much more than the cost to the brigade of a crew waiting for a call back at base and that the 'difference' is for accounting, possibly political purposes.

But please explain LocalBoy1 as apart from fuel and other materials they may use whilst on call out (foam etc) I cant on the surface of it see any other costs that arent there when they are not on call
I'm with LSC, I wasnt aware - if that is indeed the case - that firemen received a 'bonus' whenever they are called out. To be fair our assumption was a fair one to make dont you think? But I note you use the word 'evaluate' which makes me think that in reality LSC and I may be right that the actual cost to the fire brigade of a crew on call isnt actually that much more than the cost to the brigade of a crew waiting for a call back at base and that the 'difference' is for accounting, possibly political purposes. But please explain LocalBoy1 as apart from fuel and other materials they may use whilst on call out (foam etc) I cant on the surface of it see any other costs that arent there when they are not on call garston tony
  • Score: 0

2:58pm Tue 4 Mar 14

garston tony says...

Local was posting at the same time as you so didnt see your post before mine went up.

You're not making it any clearer, what are the significant additional costs of a unit on call above those of if they are just on standby then?
Local was posting at the same time as you so didnt see your post before mine went up. You're not making it any clearer, what are the significant additional costs of a unit on call above those of if they are just on standby then? garston tony
  • Score: 0

3:17pm Tue 4 Mar 14

LocalBoy1 says...

garston tony wrote:
I'm with LSC, I wasnt aware - if that is indeed the case - that firemen received a 'bonus' whenever they are called out.

To be fair our assumption was a fair one to make dont you think? But I note you use the word 'evaluate' which makes me think that in reality LSC and I may be right that the actual cost to the fire brigade of a crew on call isnt actually that much more than the cost to the brigade of a crew waiting for a call back at base and that the 'difference' is for accounting, possibly political purposes.

But please explain LocalBoy1 as apart from fuel and other materials they may use whilst on call out (foam etc) I cant on the surface of it see any other costs that arent there when they are not on call
If you don't know and you can't see it, then you know nothing about the logistical costs of running high cost/high maintenance commercial vehicles with a crew/drivers/operato
rs. You like LSC base your comments purely on a possible bonus rather than on/off road on/off call costing's. I am totally wasting my time here. I know you of old too GT as well as LSC so I will stop my comments because you are both viewing this article as laypersons and you both tend to go on and on!...
[quote][p][bold]garston tony[/bold] wrote: I'm with LSC, I wasnt aware - if that is indeed the case - that firemen received a 'bonus' whenever they are called out. To be fair our assumption was a fair one to make dont you think? But I note you use the word 'evaluate' which makes me think that in reality LSC and I may be right that the actual cost to the fire brigade of a crew on call isnt actually that much more than the cost to the brigade of a crew waiting for a call back at base and that the 'difference' is for accounting, possibly political purposes. But please explain LocalBoy1 as apart from fuel and other materials they may use whilst on call out (foam etc) I cant on the surface of it see any other costs that arent there when they are not on call[/p][/quote]If you don't know and you can't see it, then you know nothing about the logistical costs of running high cost/high maintenance commercial vehicles with a crew/drivers/operato rs. You like LSC base your comments purely on a possible bonus rather than on/off road on/off call costing's. I am totally wasting my time here. I know you of old too GT as well as LSC so I will stop my comments because you are both viewing this article as laypersons and you both tend to go on and on!... LocalBoy1
  • Score: -1

3:38pm Tue 4 Mar 14

LSC says...

I'm sorry LocalBoy1, I confess I don't understand. A firefighter costs, lets say 10 pounds an hour. A fire station costs 10 pounds an hour. A fire engine costs 10 pounds an hour. So 30 pounds an hour.
What is the difference if the fire appliance and the firefighter is sitting in the station, or is parked in Bushey High Street picking a lock?
How do the costs, apart from fuel, rise? That is what I don't understand.
I'm sorry LocalBoy1, I confess I don't understand. A firefighter costs, lets say 10 pounds an hour. A fire station costs 10 pounds an hour. A fire engine costs 10 pounds an hour. So 30 pounds an hour. What is the difference if the fire appliance and the firefighter is sitting in the station, or is parked in Bushey High Street picking a lock? How do the costs, apart from fuel, rise? That is what I don't understand. LSC
  • Score: 0

10:48am Wed 5 Mar 14

garston tony says...

Local, i queried the bonus because it was mentioned elsewhere. And we are viewing this article as lay people because we are! But to be honest you're saying what you are saying but not explaining at all why the costs shoot up when a crew go on call.

So tell us! We're only querying it because you're not telling us anything, give us some proper information and i'm not going to contest it.

Seriously, yes LSC and I and others get caught up in long discussions at times but we're not contesting what you are saying but asking you to give us some more information because we DONT KNOW! So tell us! Give us some proper information please

Seriously, you mention our other discussions but then act like JD!

JD - 'I'm right youre wrong'
Me - 'tell me why you are right'
JD - ' Im right youre wrong'
Me - 'ok, so show me where I am wrong'
JD - ' Im right youre wrong'
Me - 'come on JD, give us some meat to back up your statement'
JD - 'HA i'm right youre wrong and i'm not going to talk to you anymore'.
Me - 'typical JD cant give an answer to back up his statement'
JD - 'Im right youre wrong'
Me -'show me why'
JD - 'im right youre wrong' JD stomps off taking his football with him.
Local, i queried the bonus because it was mentioned elsewhere. And we are viewing this article as lay people because we are! But to be honest you're saying what you are saying but not explaining at all why the costs shoot up when a crew go on call. So tell us! We're only querying it because you're not telling us anything, give us some proper information and i'm not going to contest it. Seriously, yes LSC and I and others get caught up in long discussions at times but we're not contesting what you are saying but asking you to give us some more information because we DONT KNOW! So tell us! Give us some proper information please Seriously, you mention our other discussions but then act like JD! JD - 'I'm right youre wrong' Me - 'tell me why you are right' JD - ' Im right youre wrong' Me - 'ok, so show me where I am wrong' JD - ' Im right youre wrong' Me - 'come on JD, give us some meat to back up your statement' JD - 'HA i'm right youre wrong and i'm not going to talk to you anymore'. Me - 'typical JD cant give an answer to back up his statement' JD - 'Im right youre wrong' Me -'show me why' JD - 'im right youre wrong' JD stomps off taking his football with him. garston tony
  • Score: 0

10:56am Wed 5 Mar 14

garston tony says...

LSC, since Local cant give us any facts i'm with you still at this moment.

Ok, he mentioned servicing of vehicles but dont they train with them when they are waiting for a call out so to a certain extent arent those costs going to be incurred/attributabl
e to the time on stand by also?

There's fuel, but the brigade to PR stuff and go out and about. I've also seen an engine turn up outside a house because the home owner requested a review of their fire safety so there are fuel and running expenses when they are not on an actual call out.

They use up expendable stuff like foam etc during training.

Until/unless Local or someone else can give us some information i'm totally in the dark as to why the real costs are so dramtically high for a run of the mill call out (if there is such a thing) and time on standby waiting for such a call.

The only thing I can think of is my previous guess that maybe there isnt an actual major difference but they present one for political or PR or accounting purposes?
LSC, since Local cant give us any facts i'm with you still at this moment. Ok, he mentioned servicing of vehicles but dont they train with them when they are waiting for a call out so to a certain extent arent those costs going to be incurred/attributabl e to the time on stand by also? There's fuel, but the brigade to PR stuff and go out and about. I've also seen an engine turn up outside a house because the home owner requested a review of their fire safety so there are fuel and running expenses when they are not on an actual call out. They use up expendable stuff like foam etc during training. Until/unless Local or someone else can give us some information i'm totally in the dark as to why the real costs are so dramtically high for a run of the mill call out (if there is such a thing) and time on standby waiting for such a call. The only thing I can think of is my previous guess that maybe there isnt an actual major difference but they present one for political or PR or accounting purposes? garston tony
  • Score: 0

1:14pm Wed 5 Mar 14

LocalBoy1 says...

You are a pair of old tarts LSC and GT, work it out for yourselves. It isn't rocket science! How can you possibly compare me to JD? JD is quite unique, there is only one JD...)):):):)
You are a pair of old tarts LSC and GT, work it out for yourselves. It isn't rocket science! How can you possibly compare me to JD? JD is quite unique, there is only one JD...)):):):) LocalBoy1
  • Score: -1

12:59pm Thu 6 Mar 14

garston tony says...

LocalBoy1 wrote:
You are a pair of old tarts LSC and GT, work it out for yourselves. It isn't rocket science! How can you possibly compare me to JD? JD is quite unique, there is only one JD...)):):):)
Oh JD is unique alright, but not in a good way. You're just like him because you wont back up what you say!
[quote][p][bold]LocalBoy1[/bold] wrote: You are a pair of old tarts LSC and GT, work it out for yourselves. It isn't rocket science! How can you possibly compare me to JD? JD is quite unique, there is only one JD...)):):):)[/p][/quote]Oh JD is unique alright, but not in a good way. You're just like him because you wont back up what you say! garston tony
  • Score: 0

4:16pm Thu 6 Mar 14

LocalBoy1 says...

garston tony wrote:
LocalBoy1 wrote:
You are a pair of old tarts LSC and GT, work it out for yourselves. It isn't rocket science! How can you possibly compare me to JD? JD is quite unique, there is only one JD...)):):):)
Oh JD is unique alright, but not in a good way. You're just like him because you wont back up what you say!
This is an old chestnut with you GT, you normally pull this card out in a political debate. However, I cannot teach you what you are unable to learn...
[quote][p][bold]garston tony[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LocalBoy1[/bold] wrote: You are a pair of old tarts LSC and GT, work it out for yourselves. It isn't rocket science! How can you possibly compare me to JD? JD is quite unique, there is only one JD...)):):):)[/p][/quote]Oh JD is unique alright, but not in a good way. You're just like him because you wont back up what you say![/p][/quote]This is an old chestnut with you GT, you normally pull this card out in a political debate. However, I cannot teach you what you are unable to learn... LocalBoy1
  • Score: 0

9:27am Fri 28 Mar 14

dropped a monster says...

sounds the sort of thing old toilet mouth racist poster gypo joe on the newshopper would do on his way to clean toilets! perhaps he forgot his tu tu and was going back for it then realised he'd like to see some guys in uniforms! lmao ;)
sounds the sort of thing old toilet mouth racist poster gypo joe on the newshopper would do on his way to clean toilets! perhaps he forgot his tu tu and was going back for it then realised he'd like to see some guys in uniforms! lmao ;) dropped a monster
  • Score: 0

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