Radlett man's death in Georgia 'could have been the result of a road traffic accident'

Watford Observer: Radlett man's death in Georgia 'could have been the result of a road traffic accident' Radlett man's death in Georgia 'could have been the result of a road traffic accident'

It is still not clear how a man from Radlett died in Georgia almost four years ago, an inquest revealed.

Philip Rodgers’s body was discovered in a village in Mukhadtskaro, Mtskheta, at 8am on March 27, 2010 according to a report from the Ministry of Justice, which was given to the British Embassy.

At an inquest, Hertfordshire Coroner Edward Thomas said it was not known why the 45-year-old British national, of Shenley Road, Radlett, was in the country.

Mr Rodgers’ body was bought back to the UK and the death certificate confirmed the reason for the cause of death was closed trauma of the chest, swelling, and bruising of the lungs.

A forensic post mortem examination was carried out in the UK by Peter Dureet.

He said in his report: "The body was of a well nourished male, six feet and one and a half inches in height. No natural disease was found to account to, or contribute to, his death.

"There were features internally and externally which could have been the result of a road traffic accident. The external parchment abrasions and internal deep bruising on the back fall into this category. There is no evidence of any vehicle impact. There is no evidence of any significant trauma to the body which could cause death by head injury, or trauma to the chest.

"One possibility is that he was struck by a vehicle from the back and fell forward creating the chest abrasions."

There was however no facial injuries to support this theory and decomposition was such that these findings were present and disappeared.

Coroner Thomas said in the respiratory system Mr Dureet found no evidence of fractures on the ribs but a report from the forensic examination carried out in Georgia suggested the cause of death was "acute insufficiency of breath" which could have been developed on the background of serious alcohol intoxication.  The were also traces on ethanol in Mr Rodgers' blood.

Mr Rodgers had apparently spoken to his family a day before he died and had gone to a Georgian hospital on March 25 but was discharged.

Police were reportedly unable to continue with their investigation into his death.

Coroner Thomas said: "The family tell me the police in the UK were not able to assist further in the investigation. The family sought information from the British Embassy, the foreign office in London and they feel all possible investigations into the circumstances have been undertaken and nothing further can be done." 

The cause of death was recorded as unascertained and an open verdict was given.

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