Teenage drug-dealer told to 'go away and don't even think about coming back' by judge

Teenage drug-dealer told to 'go away and don't even think about coming back' by judge

Teenage drug-dealer told to 'go away and don't even think about coming back' by judge

First published in News by

A teenage drug dealer was given a chance by a judge, who told him to: "Go away and don't even think about coming back."

Joshua Finn, 19, of Woodland Way, Bedmond, received a two year suspended sentence and a six month curfew after the police found 13 wraps of the cocaine hidden in the loft at his home.

Prosecutor Margaret Mascherenas told St Albans crown court on Tuesday that the officers discovered cocaine, weighing 12.34 grams, and a dealer's list when they raided the address.

Finn was arrested and made no comment to police questions. He refused to give the officers the PIN to his mobile phone, so they were unable to investigate his contacts.

He pleaded guilty to supplying cocaine on March 25 this year. He had no previous convictions, but one caution for shoplifting.

Defence barrister Richard Storey said: "He had begun to use cocaine and had developed an £80-a-day habit.

"He got into debt with pay day loan companies and owed £3,000, but has sought help and is now paying the money back at £250 a month.

"He has said he deserves to be punished and has stopped taking cocaine."

Mr Storey said Finn was now working as a trainee roofer, earning £300 a week.

Judge John Plumstead told him: "You have a good work record. You are going to have to decide whether you are going to settle down as a decent member of humanity or go into criminality. Do you understand?"

Finn, who had been supported in court by his mother and a former boss, replied: "I understand."

The judge passed a two year jail term suspended for 18 months, with a six month curfew on Friday and Saturday nights between 8pm and 8am and ordered him to pay £380 costs.

He said: "Go away and don't even think about coming back."

Comments (6)

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11:36am Wed 16 Apr 14

Boosey says...

Softly softly does it, what a pathetic judge!
Softly softly does it, what a pathetic judge! Boosey
  • Score: 4

12:28pm Wed 16 Apr 14

garston tony says...

Normally I'd agree with you Boosey, all I would say is that if this chap does take this opportunity to turn things around this is probably not a bad decision in the circumstances. However if the lad does end up back in court at some point in the future there should be no more chances given
Normally I'd agree with you Boosey, all I would say is that if this chap does take this opportunity to turn things around this is probably not a bad decision in the circumstances. However if the lad does end up back in court at some point in the future there should be no more chances given garston tony
  • Score: 9

12:59pm Wed 16 Apr 14

D_Penn says...

I would love to think that this guy could turn his life around, but one part of this report concerned me.

One of the conditions for avoiding imprisonment should have been for him to give the police his mobile's PIN number. His unwillingness to co-operate on this matter suggests his loyalties are still misplaced.

The judge should have placed more weighting to this aspect and sent him down.
I would love to think that this guy could turn his life around, but one part of this report concerned me. One of the conditions for avoiding imprisonment should have been for him to give the police his mobile's PIN number. His unwillingness to co-operate on this matter suggests his loyalties are still misplaced. The judge should have placed more weighting to this aspect and sent him down. D_Penn
  • Score: 2

7:30pm Wed 16 Apr 14

Boosey says...

D_Penn wrote:
I would love to think that this guy could turn his life around, but one part of this report concerned me.

One of the conditions for avoiding imprisonment should have been for him to give the police his mobile's PIN number. His unwillingness to co-operate on this matter suggests his loyalties are still misplaced.

The judge should have placed more weighting to this aspect and sent him down.
100% agree.
[quote][p][bold]D_Penn[/bold] wrote: I would love to think that this guy could turn his life around, but one part of this report concerned me. One of the conditions for avoiding imprisonment should have been for him to give the police his mobile's PIN number. His unwillingness to co-operate on this matter suggests his loyalties are still misplaced. The judge should have placed more weighting to this aspect and sent him down.[/p][/quote]100% agree. Boosey
  • Score: -3

2:36pm Thu 17 Apr 14

CaptainPC says...

Hang on. He was selling stuff people wanted to buy. He hasn't hurt anyone, he's pleased guilty and he's working, why send him to jail?

The pin number to his mobile phone? Why should police have access to his private information. There was no evidential need as he pleased guilty and there was obviously no just cause as other OB would have made a seizure order.

Interesting to know that UKIP are in favour of MORE police powers.....
Hang on. He was selling stuff people wanted to buy. He hasn't hurt anyone, he's pleased guilty and he's working, why send him to jail? The pin number to his mobile phone? Why should police have access to his private information. There was no evidential need as he pleased guilty and there was obviously no just cause as other OB would have made a seizure order. Interesting to know that UKIP are in favour of MORE police powers..... CaptainPC
  • Score: 3

4:53pm Thu 17 Apr 14

RadioactiveRant says...

D_Penn wrote:
I would love to think that this guy could turn his life around, but one part of this report concerned me.

One of the conditions for avoiding imprisonment should have been for him to give the police his mobile's PIN number. His unwillingness to co-operate on this matter suggests his loyalties are still misplaced.

The judge should have placed more weighting to this aspect and sent him down.
He could have been sent down for failure to disclose his PIN (Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000, Part III). Others have been.

Its like the police/courts can't even be bothered to do their jobs any more.
[quote][p][bold]D_Penn[/bold] wrote: I would love to think that this guy could turn his life around, but one part of this report concerned me. One of the conditions for avoiding imprisonment should have been for him to give the police his mobile's PIN number. His unwillingness to co-operate on this matter suggests his loyalties are still misplaced. The judge should have placed more weighting to this aspect and sent him down.[/p][/quote]He could have been sent down for failure to disclose his PIN (Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000, Part III). Others have been. Its like the police/courts can't even be bothered to do their jobs any more. RadioactiveRant
  • Score: -2

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