Three dogs seized from elderly owner following alleged attack

Three dogs seized from elderly owner following alleged attack

Three dogs seized from elderly owner following alleged attack

First published in News Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author by , Senior Reporter

Three dogs have been seized by police after a man was bitten on a Watford footpath.

On Friday, April 11, it was alleged that a group of dogs attacked a dog being walked by two teenage girls in Harebreaks recreation ground.

Another incident occurred on Monday, May 19, when it was alleged that a dog bit a man in his 30s, causing swelling, on a footpath in the Harebreaks area.

A warrant was granted by a magistrates’ court and officers seized the three dogs under the Dangerous Dogs Act.

Officers from the North Watford Safer Neighbourhood Team (SNT) seized three dogs from an address in Watford on Friday, May 30, following incidents reported in the area.

The team was supported by officers from the Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Hertfordshire Dog Unit.

The owner of the dogs, a 72-year-old man from Watford, was interviewed under caution and reported for the offence of allowing a dog to be dangerously out of control in a public place.

PC Nicola Simons said: "Our priority is the safety of the public and so the power to seize the dogs was used whilst the owner of the dogs attends court to answer these allegations. We would like to reassure the public that we take all incidents involving dogs very seriously and will always attempt to take positive action."

The dogs are currently housed in kennels and their owner is awaiting a court date.

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9:07pm Wed 4 Jun 14

misty177 says...

I know these 3 dogs and whilst one of them can be a bit jealous and protective there is no way you would call them dangerous dogs. Would need to know what really happened to cause these incidents. Whilst I am sorry for the bloke who got nipped I really hope these dogs are not destroyed as they don't deserve it. Kept on leads at all times yes but not destroyed
I know these 3 dogs and whilst one of them can be a bit jealous and protective there is no way you would call them dangerous dogs. Would need to know what really happened to cause these incidents. Whilst I am sorry for the bloke who got nipped I really hope these dogs are not destroyed as they don't deserve it. Kept on leads at all times yes but not destroyed misty177
  • Score: 0

8:38am Thu 5 Jun 14

The Rover says...

misty177 wrote:
I know these 3 dogs and whilst one of them can be a bit jealous and protective there is no way you would call them dangerous dogs. Would need to know what really happened to cause these incidents. Whilst I am sorry for the bloke who got nipped I really hope these dogs are not destroyed as they don't deserve it. Kept on leads at all times yes but not destroyed
Problem is the opportunity to keep the dogs on leads has passed. These are 2 incidents that have been reported. I am sure there will be more than were not reported.
[quote][p][bold]misty177[/bold] wrote: I know these 3 dogs and whilst one of them can be a bit jealous and protective there is no way you would call them dangerous dogs. Would need to know what really happened to cause these incidents. Whilst I am sorry for the bloke who got nipped I really hope these dogs are not destroyed as they don't deserve it. Kept on leads at all times yes but not destroyed[/p][/quote]Problem is the opportunity to keep the dogs on leads has passed. These are 2 incidents that have been reported. I am sure there will be more than were not reported. The Rover
  • Score: 6

10:48am Thu 5 Jun 14

garston tony says...

Unless these dogs were reacting in self defence ie the man and those other dogs had been attacking them unprovoked first then misty these dogs have shown themselves to be dangerous and there is no excuse for calling them anything else.

I dont get this idea that just because a dog(s) are ok around the owner and their friends that it is assumed they are going to be alright around everyone in all environments. They are animals and can turn, even against the owner and people they know, without warning.

There have been far too many reports of previously docile dogs turning on their owners let alone strangers to deadly effect to justify your complacency misty, lets just be thankful that they didnt cause more harm and hope that they are dealt with appropriately
Unless these dogs were reacting in self defence ie the man and those other dogs had been attacking them unprovoked first then misty these dogs have shown themselves to be dangerous and there is no excuse for calling them anything else. I dont get this idea that just because a dog(s) are ok around the owner and their friends that it is assumed they are going to be alright around everyone in all environments. They are animals and can turn, even against the owner and people they know, without warning. There have been far too many reports of previously docile dogs turning on their owners let alone strangers to deadly effect to justify your complacency misty, lets just be thankful that they didnt cause more harm and hope that they are dealt with appropriately garston tony
  • Score: 9

11:08am Thu 5 Jun 14

garston tony says...

I in no way wish to sound like I am against dogs and their owners (many of whom I know are responsible) but the article suggests that these dogs were off the leash. Again I dont wish to sound like I am against dogs being let off the leash but, as the above unfortunate incidents show, it has to be in appropriate suroundings and taking into account both the temperament of the dog itself as well as whoever else may be in the surrounding area.

I'll give you an example, the other weekend when it was nice weather I and a group of friends went to a park and with us were some young children. There were other people in the park including some people walking their dogs. On several occassions we had dogs run through our picnic with the owners, if they bothered to acknowledge the disturbance at all, laughing off the incident with a 'it wont hurt you' or 'its just being friendly ha ha'.

Sorry I dont care if its friendly and hasnt in the past bitten anyone I a) dont want a dog snuffling and slavering through what I am about to eat and walking all over it knocking things over and b) to a young child your beloved dog can be a frightening beast and if a child is shying away from your pet in fright and tears a jokey laugh is not an appropriate response.

Not one of those dogs responded immediately to their masters calls to come away (some owners didnt even bother to call them away!), not one. So if it had gotten into any of those beasts heads to attack one of us there would have been no help from the owner. The lack of responsible ownership was made worse that we were not the only ones having a picnic and these dogs were just going from one group to the next with the owners not doing a thing to prevent it. Sorry dog owners, not everyone one wants a hairy canine around them so dont act like your dog is everyones best friend
I in no way wish to sound like I am against dogs and their owners (many of whom I know are responsible) but the article suggests that these dogs were off the leash. Again I dont wish to sound like I am against dogs being let off the leash but, as the above unfortunate incidents show, it has to be in appropriate suroundings and taking into account both the temperament of the dog itself as well as whoever else may be in the surrounding area. I'll give you an example, the other weekend when it was nice weather I and a group of friends went to a park and with us were some young children. There were other people in the park including some people walking their dogs. On several occassions we had dogs run through our picnic with the owners, if they bothered to acknowledge the disturbance at all, laughing off the incident with a 'it wont hurt you' or 'its just being friendly ha ha'. Sorry I dont care if its friendly and hasnt in the past bitten anyone I a) dont want a dog snuffling and slavering through what I am about to eat and walking all over it knocking things over and b) to a young child your beloved dog can be a frightening beast and if a child is shying away from your pet in fright and tears a jokey laugh is not an appropriate response. Not one of those dogs responded immediately to their masters calls to come away (some owners didnt even bother to call them away!), not one. So if it had gotten into any of those beasts heads to attack one of us there would have been no help from the owner. The lack of responsible ownership was made worse that we were not the only ones having a picnic and these dogs were just going from one group to the next with the owners not doing a thing to prevent it. Sorry dog owners, not everyone one wants a hairy canine around them so dont act like your dog is everyones best friend garston tony
  • Score: 9

12:13pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Boosey says...

I have a rescue dog and with all rescue dogs they have issues. My dog has never been socialised and is frightened of other dogs and to show that she is frightened she will run up to the other dogs and bark.
Not once has she ever bitten another dog but unfortunately if the other dog runs, she will chase and possibly just roll the dog over.
Sometimes the other dog will retaliate and a fight occurs but it looks worse than it actually is and normally my dog is on the receiving end.
Unfortunately it's the way of the world, all humans don't automatically get on and it's the same in the animal world.
The problem is the owners reactions, maybe they should read up about dog behaviour before owning one and stop screaming and wanting a fight just because a dog has barked at theirs.
Also I would be very surprised that one of those dogs mentioned above bit someone just for the hell of it.
Dogs will be dogs, shame about the picnic though!
Seriously, I have had grown men nearly crying because my dog has barked at their precious poppy or whatever the name of the dog is, grown men threatening to knock my head off because their own reaction has worsened the situation, I also know of female dog walkers being bullied by grown men. I have had to bite my tongue on so many occasions.
It's not the dog, it's the owner!
I have a rescue dog and with all rescue dogs they have issues. My dog has never been socialised and is frightened of other dogs and to show that she is frightened she will run up to the other dogs and bark. Not once has she ever bitten another dog but unfortunately if the other dog runs, she will chase and possibly just roll the dog over. Sometimes the other dog will retaliate and a fight occurs but it looks worse than it actually is and normally my dog is on the receiving end. Unfortunately it's the way of the world, all humans don't automatically get on and it's the same in the animal world. The problem is the owners reactions, maybe they should read up about dog behaviour before owning one and stop screaming and wanting a fight just because a dog has barked at theirs. Also I would be very surprised that one of those dogs mentioned above bit someone just for the hell of it. Dogs will be dogs, shame about the picnic though! Seriously, I have had grown men nearly crying because my dog has barked at their precious poppy or whatever the name of the dog is, grown men threatening to knock my head off because their own reaction has worsened the situation, I also know of female dog walkers being bullied by grown men. I have had to bite my tongue on so many occasions. It's not the dog, it's the owner! Boosey
  • Score: -4

8:27am Fri 6 Jun 14

garston tony says...

Boosey wrote:
I have a rescue dog and with all rescue dogs they have issues. My dog has never been socialised and is frightened of other dogs and to show that she is frightened she will run up to the other dogs and bark. Not once has she ever bitten another dog but unfortunately if the other dog runs, she will chase and possibly just roll the dog over. Sometimes the other dog will retaliate and a fight occurs but it looks worse than it actually is and normally my dog is on the receiving end. Unfortunately it's the way of the world, all humans don't automatically get on and it's the same in the animal world. The problem is the owners reactions, maybe they should read up about dog behaviour before owning one and stop screaming and wanting a fight just because a dog has barked at theirs. Also I would be very surprised that one of those dogs mentioned above bit someone just for the hell of it. Dogs will be dogs, shame about the picnic though! Seriously, I have had grown men nearly crying because my dog has barked at their precious poppy or whatever the name of the dog is, grown men threatening to knock my head off because their own reaction has worsened the situation, I also know of female dog walkers being bullied by grown men. I have had to bite my tongue on so many occasions. It's not the dog, it's the owner!
You have a dog that you know is jumpy and yet its other peoples fault if they dont react to it the way you would like them to!

Hows about you have a dog that is jumpy and you dont allow it to get near anyone or anything that means others have to react in a manner 'that worsens the situation' in the first place.

Sorry, this is precisely what I am on about a dog owner who thinks we should all accept their precious and allow it to do whatever it wants around us.
[quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: I have a rescue dog and with all rescue dogs they have issues. My dog has never been socialised and is frightened of other dogs and to show that she is frightened she will run up to the other dogs and bark. Not once has she ever bitten another dog but unfortunately if the other dog runs, she will chase and possibly just roll the dog over. Sometimes the other dog will retaliate and a fight occurs but it looks worse than it actually is and normally my dog is on the receiving end. Unfortunately it's the way of the world, all humans don't automatically get on and it's the same in the animal world. The problem is the owners reactions, maybe they should read up about dog behaviour before owning one and stop screaming and wanting a fight just because a dog has barked at theirs. Also I would be very surprised that one of those dogs mentioned above bit someone just for the hell of it. Dogs will be dogs, shame about the picnic though! Seriously, I have had grown men nearly crying because my dog has barked at their precious poppy or whatever the name of the dog is, grown men threatening to knock my head off because their own reaction has worsened the situation, I also know of female dog walkers being bullied by grown men. I have had to bite my tongue on so many occasions. It's not the dog, it's the owner![/p][/quote]You have a dog that you know is jumpy and yet its other peoples fault if they dont react to it the way you would like them to! Hows about you have a dog that is jumpy and you dont allow it to get near anyone or anything that means others have to react in a manner 'that worsens the situation' in the first place. Sorry, this is precisely what I am on about a dog owner who thinks we should all accept their precious and allow it to do whatever it wants around us. garston tony
  • Score: 6

11:48am Fri 6 Jun 14

Boosey says...

garston tony wrote:
Boosey wrote:
I have a rescue dog and with all rescue dogs they have issues. My dog has never been socialised and is frightened of other dogs and to show that she is frightened she will run up to the other dogs and bark. Not once has she ever bitten another dog but unfortunately if the other dog runs, she will chase and possibly just roll the dog over. Sometimes the other dog will retaliate and a fight occurs but it looks worse than it actually is and normally my dog is on the receiving end. Unfortunately it's the way of the world, all humans don't automatically get on and it's the same in the animal world. The problem is the owners reactions, maybe they should read up about dog behaviour before owning one and stop screaming and wanting a fight just because a dog has barked at theirs. Also I would be very surprised that one of those dogs mentioned above bit someone just for the hell of it. Dogs will be dogs, shame about the picnic though! Seriously, I have had grown men nearly crying because my dog has barked at their precious poppy or whatever the name of the dog is, grown men threatening to knock my head off because their own reaction has worsened the situation, I also know of female dog walkers being bullied by grown men. I have had to bite my tongue on so many occasions. It's not the dog, it's the owner!
You have a dog that you know is jumpy and yet its other peoples fault if they dont react to it the way you would like them to!

Hows about you have a dog that is jumpy and you dont allow it to get near anyone or anything that means others have to react in a manner 'that worsens the situation' in the first place.

Sorry, this is precisely what I am on about a dog owner who thinks we should all accept their precious and allow it to do whatever it wants around us.
It's the minority like you who know **** all and make a mountain out of a mole hill!
[quote][p][bold]garston tony[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: I have a rescue dog and with all rescue dogs they have issues. My dog has never been socialised and is frightened of other dogs and to show that she is frightened she will run up to the other dogs and bark. Not once has she ever bitten another dog but unfortunately if the other dog runs, she will chase and possibly just roll the dog over. Sometimes the other dog will retaliate and a fight occurs but it looks worse than it actually is and normally my dog is on the receiving end. Unfortunately it's the way of the world, all humans don't automatically get on and it's the same in the animal world. The problem is the owners reactions, maybe they should read up about dog behaviour before owning one and stop screaming and wanting a fight just because a dog has barked at theirs. Also I would be very surprised that one of those dogs mentioned above bit someone just for the hell of it. Dogs will be dogs, shame about the picnic though! Seriously, I have had grown men nearly crying because my dog has barked at their precious poppy or whatever the name of the dog is, grown men threatening to knock my head off because their own reaction has worsened the situation, I also know of female dog walkers being bullied by grown men. I have had to bite my tongue on so many occasions. It's not the dog, it's the owner![/p][/quote]You have a dog that you know is jumpy and yet its other peoples fault if they dont react to it the way you would like them to! Hows about you have a dog that is jumpy and you dont allow it to get near anyone or anything that means others have to react in a manner 'that worsens the situation' in the first place. Sorry, this is precisely what I am on about a dog owner who thinks we should all accept their precious and allow it to do whatever it wants around us.[/p][/quote]It's the minority like you who know **** all and make a mountain out of a mole hill! Boosey
  • Score: -2

12:26pm Fri 6 Jun 14

Boosey says...

garston tony wrote:
Boosey wrote:
I have a rescue dog and with all rescue dogs they have issues. My dog has never been socialised and is frightened of other dogs and to show that she is frightened she will run up to the other dogs and bark. Not once has she ever bitten another dog but unfortunately if the other dog runs, she will chase and possibly just roll the dog over. Sometimes the other dog will retaliate and a fight occurs but it looks worse than it actually is and normally my dog is on the receiving end. Unfortunately it's the way of the world, all humans don't automatically get on and it's the same in the animal world. The problem is the owners reactions, maybe they should read up about dog behaviour before owning one and stop screaming and wanting a fight just because a dog has barked at theirs. Also I would be very surprised that one of those dogs mentioned above bit someone just for the hell of it. Dogs will be dogs, shame about the picnic though! Seriously, I have had grown men nearly crying because my dog has barked at their precious poppy or whatever the name of the dog is, grown men threatening to knock my head off because their own reaction has worsened the situation, I also know of female dog walkers being bullied by grown men. I have had to bite my tongue on so many occasions. It's not the dog, it's the owner!
You have a dog that you know is jumpy and yet its other peoples fault if they dont react to it the way you would like them to!

Hows about you have a dog that is jumpy and you dont allow it to get near anyone or anything that means others have to react in a manner 'that worsens the situation' in the first place.

Sorry, this is precisely what I am on about a dog owner who thinks we should all accept their precious and allow it to do whatever it wants around us.
I do my utmost to keep away from other dog owners, I do not go anywhere where there are children playing and it's not always the case my dog will go to another but I don't threaten people just because their dog has had a go at mine. This is not always the outcome, some dogs will want to play and mine will always accept but as I have said previously, not everyone gets on and it's the same in the canine world.
Yes, I agree it was irresponsible of the dog owners to allow their pets to rampage through your picnic and frighten your children but don't tar all dog owners with the same brush.
[quote][p][bold]garston tony[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: I have a rescue dog and with all rescue dogs they have issues. My dog has never been socialised and is frightened of other dogs and to show that she is frightened she will run up to the other dogs and bark. Not once has she ever bitten another dog but unfortunately if the other dog runs, she will chase and possibly just roll the dog over. Sometimes the other dog will retaliate and a fight occurs but it looks worse than it actually is and normally my dog is on the receiving end. Unfortunately it's the way of the world, all humans don't automatically get on and it's the same in the animal world. The problem is the owners reactions, maybe they should read up about dog behaviour before owning one and stop screaming and wanting a fight just because a dog has barked at theirs. Also I would be very surprised that one of those dogs mentioned above bit someone just for the hell of it. Dogs will be dogs, shame about the picnic though! Seriously, I have had grown men nearly crying because my dog has barked at their precious poppy or whatever the name of the dog is, grown men threatening to knock my head off because their own reaction has worsened the situation, I also know of female dog walkers being bullied by grown men. I have had to bite my tongue on so many occasions. It's not the dog, it's the owner![/p][/quote]You have a dog that you know is jumpy and yet its other peoples fault if they dont react to it the way you would like them to! Hows about you have a dog that is jumpy and you dont allow it to get near anyone or anything that means others have to react in a manner 'that worsens the situation' in the first place. Sorry, this is precisely what I am on about a dog owner who thinks we should all accept their precious and allow it to do whatever it wants around us.[/p][/quote]I do my utmost to keep away from other dog owners, I do not go anywhere where there are children playing and it's not always the case my dog will go to another but I don't threaten people just because their dog has had a go at mine. This is not always the outcome, some dogs will want to play and mine will always accept but as I have said previously, not everyone gets on and it's the same in the canine world. Yes, I agree it was irresponsible of the dog owners to allow their pets to rampage through your picnic and frighten your children but don't tar all dog owners with the same brush. Boosey
  • Score: 0

1:00pm Fri 6 Jun 14

garston tony says...

Boosey wrote:
garston tony wrote:
Boosey wrote: I have a rescue dog and with all rescue dogs they have issues. My dog has never been socialised and is frightened of other dogs and to show that she is frightened she will run up to the other dogs and bark. Not once has she ever bitten another dog but unfortunately if the other dog runs, she will chase and possibly just roll the dog over. Sometimes the other dog will retaliate and a fight occurs but it looks worse than it actually is and normally my dog is on the receiving end. Unfortunately it's the way of the world, all humans don't automatically get on and it's the same in the animal world. The problem is the owners reactions, maybe they should read up about dog behaviour before owning one and stop screaming and wanting a fight just because a dog has barked at theirs. Also I would be very surprised that one of those dogs mentioned above bit someone just for the hell of it. Dogs will be dogs, shame about the picnic though! Seriously, I have had grown men nearly crying because my dog has barked at their precious poppy or whatever the name of the dog is, grown men threatening to knock my head off because their own reaction has worsened the situation, I also know of female dog walkers being bullied by grown men. I have had to bite my tongue on so many occasions. It's not the dog, it's the owner!
You have a dog that you know is jumpy and yet its other peoples fault if they dont react to it the way you would like them to! Hows about you have a dog that is jumpy and you dont allow it to get near anyone or anything that means others have to react in a manner 'that worsens the situation' in the first place. Sorry, this is precisely what I am on about a dog owner who thinks we should all accept their precious and allow it to do whatever it wants around us.
It's the minority like you who know **** all and make a mountain out of a mole hill!
From early childhood to mid 30's I always had a dog, my sibling has had dogs and many of my friends have them still. I may not have a dog now but I am far from unknowing about their ownership.

I was not taring all dog owners with the same brush, I made that point clear in a previous post. I am aware that there are plenty of responsible owners but I was basing my coments on yours where you gave the impression that you felt if your dog was not behaving it was someone elses fault.

Not everyone knows how to deal with dogs, that is not their fault, so if they dont know how to act around your dog - especially given its jumpy nature - and makes things worse then how is that their fault? The onus is on you not to allow your pet to get into that situation. Easier said than done yes, but you are wrong to blame the reactions of others for your dogs actions and temperament which is what you were doing
[quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]garston tony[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boosey[/bold] wrote: I have a rescue dog and with all rescue dogs they have issues. My dog has never been socialised and is frightened of other dogs and to show that she is frightened she will run up to the other dogs and bark. Not once has she ever bitten another dog but unfortunately if the other dog runs, she will chase and possibly just roll the dog over. Sometimes the other dog will retaliate and a fight occurs but it looks worse than it actually is and normally my dog is on the receiving end. Unfortunately it's the way of the world, all humans don't automatically get on and it's the same in the animal world. The problem is the owners reactions, maybe they should read up about dog behaviour before owning one and stop screaming and wanting a fight just because a dog has barked at theirs. Also I would be very surprised that one of those dogs mentioned above bit someone just for the hell of it. Dogs will be dogs, shame about the picnic though! Seriously, I have had grown men nearly crying because my dog has barked at their precious poppy or whatever the name of the dog is, grown men threatening to knock my head off because their own reaction has worsened the situation, I also know of female dog walkers being bullied by grown men. I have had to bite my tongue on so many occasions. It's not the dog, it's the owner![/p][/quote]You have a dog that you know is jumpy and yet its other peoples fault if they dont react to it the way you would like them to! Hows about you have a dog that is jumpy and you dont allow it to get near anyone or anything that means others have to react in a manner 'that worsens the situation' in the first place. Sorry, this is precisely what I am on about a dog owner who thinks we should all accept their precious and allow it to do whatever it wants around us.[/p][/quote]It's the minority like you who know **** all and make a mountain out of a mole hill![/p][/quote]From early childhood to mid 30's I always had a dog, my sibling has had dogs and many of my friends have them still. I may not have a dog now but I am far from unknowing about their ownership. I was not taring all dog owners with the same brush, I made that point clear in a previous post. I am aware that there are plenty of responsible owners but I was basing my coments on yours where you gave the impression that you felt if your dog was not behaving it was someone elses fault. Not everyone knows how to deal with dogs, that is not their fault, so if they dont know how to act around your dog - especially given its jumpy nature - and makes things worse then how is that their fault? The onus is on you not to allow your pet to get into that situation. Easier said than done yes, but you are wrong to blame the reactions of others for your dogs actions and temperament which is what you were doing garston tony
  • Score: 2

4:00pm Fri 6 Jun 14

misty177 says...

Garston Tony -
What are you an expert on dogs or beasts as you like to call?
Garston Tony - What are you an expert on dogs or beasts as you like to call? misty177
  • Score: 1

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