Watford and Three Rivers councils face £1.6m IT bill to update new software

Watford Observer: Watford and Three Rivers councils face £1.6m IT bill to update new software Watford and Three Rivers councils face £1.6m IT bill to update new software

Council bosses are requesting more than £1.6 million to modernise out-dated computer software in order to avert what opposition politicans have called a potential "disaster".

 

Three Rivers District Council has been asked to stump up £653,000 to fix its "aged" software, which will directly impact on council-run services such as housing benefits, revenues and electoral services.

As these services are shared between Three Rivers District Council and Watford Borough Council, the two local authorities will be sharing the computer costs.

The amount of £653,000 requested from Three Rivers would only cover 40 per cent of the cash needed.

The council outsourced its IT service to Capita in May last year and the request for extra funding comes just months after Three Rivers set its annual budget.

This new programme was not included in the original budget and is therefore additional expenditure to that already agreed. 

Councillor David Sansom, Conservative representative for Rickmansworth Town, said: "I am amazed to find that the Three Rivers ICT department is yet again facing disaster and in need of £653,000.

"The Liberal Democrats at Three Rivers District Council have only just set their budget for this year and already it is being blown apart by the need to urgently replace ‘aged servers’.

"They were not much younger three months ago when the budget was set, you have to question what kind of management sets an annual budget and then can’t even stick with it for three months."

The proposal was put forward to the district council’s policy and resources committee meeting on Monday night.

Politicians rejected the application for the full sum of money, instead committing £200,000 to the programme.

Ann Shaw, leader of the Liberal Democrat-run council, said: "The policy and resources committee did not agree to the sum requested.

"The IT Service has been outsourced and new information has come forward but far more detail is required.

"The council is reviewing the whole budget to see where savings can be made to meet reduced revenue and compensate for necessary expenditure.

"It is also expected that investment in the council's IT will enable staff to work more efficiently and produce savings for the future."

In order for the scheme to go ahead, 60 per cent  will need to be supplied by Watford Borough Council - on top of the remaining £453,000 if extra funding is not awarded by Three Rivers.

Comments (21)

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5:18pm Thu 10 Jul 14

croxley46 says...

Meet it from reserves - both councils have been rooking us Council Tax payers for years, then wasting OUR money on grandiose schemes such as the Parade and Pond redevelopment.
Outsourcing doesn't work - it's a false economy.
Meet it from reserves - both councils have been rooking us Council Tax payers for years, then wasting OUR money on grandiose schemes such as the Parade and Pond redevelopment. Outsourcing doesn't work - it's a false economy. croxley46
  • Score: 9

6:32pm Thu 10 Jul 14

Feel Coax says...

Expecting a comment from a certain IT Consultant.
Expecting a comment from a certain IT Consultant. Feel Coax
  • Score: 4

7:00pm Thu 10 Jul 14

Retlas says...

Rip off Britain comes to mind!!

What's hapened to all the money invested by TRDC in Iceland - no funnies please - that I think was, in some way, reimbursed?

Use the the reserves, that croxley46 refers to. I have to use my savings for some expenditure and the council taxpayer is not a cash cow. Eventualy it will run dry!!

Rant over!!
Rip off Britain comes to mind!! What's hapened to all the money invested by TRDC in Iceland - no funnies please - that I think was, in some way, reimbursed? Use the the reserves, that croxley46 refers to. I have to use my savings for some expenditure and the council taxpayer is not a cash cow. Eventualy it will run dry!! Rant over!! Retlas
  • Score: 6

8:24pm Thu 10 Jul 14

ancientandageing says...

might consider going for a radical non Microsoft based solution, could save a lot of money
might consider going for a radical non Microsoft based solution, could save a lot of money ancientandageing
  • Score: -2

9:25pm Thu 10 Jul 14

theturpster says...

ancientandageing wrote:
might consider going for a radical non Microsoft based solution, could save a lot of money
Not necessarily, the individual MS license for retail is not a bench mark for this spend. Councils are part of the MS VLS (volume licensing scheme) which really works out a pittance per workstation). Migrating to a complete open source network for what you save on licensing would be blown out the water with man hours used to configure, plus the staff training on top. Something I myself have investigated.
[quote][p][bold]ancientandageing[/bold] wrote: might consider going for a radical non Microsoft based solution, could save a lot of money[/p][/quote]Not necessarily, the individual MS license for retail is not a bench mark for this spend. Councils are part of the MS VLS (volume licensing scheme) which really works out a pittance per workstation). Migrating to a complete open source network for what you save on licensing would be blown out the water with man hours used to configure, plus the staff training on top. Something I myself have investigated. theturpster
  • Score: 2

10:51pm Thu 10 Jul 14

ancientandageing says...

theturpster wrote:
ancientandageing wrote:
might consider going for a radical non Microsoft based solution, could save a lot of money
Not necessarily, the individual MS license for retail is not a bench mark for this spend. Councils are part of the MS VLS (volume licensing scheme) which really works out a pittance per workstation). Migrating to a complete open source network for what you save on licensing would be blown out the water with man hours used to configure, plus the staff training on top. Something I myself have investigated.
so you have considered it and I bow to your investigation based knowledge
[quote][p][bold]theturpster[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ancientandageing[/bold] wrote: might consider going for a radical non Microsoft based solution, could save a lot of money[/p][/quote]Not necessarily, the individual MS license for retail is not a bench mark for this spend. Councils are part of the MS VLS (volume licensing scheme) which really works out a pittance per workstation). Migrating to a complete open source network for what you save on licensing would be blown out the water with man hours used to configure, plus the staff training on top. Something I myself have investigated.[/p][/quote]so you have considered it and I bow to your investigation based knowledge ancientandageing
  • Score: -1

10:54pm Thu 10 Jul 14

croxley46 says...

Retlas wrote:
Rip off Britain comes to mind!!

What's hapened to all the money invested by TRDC in Iceland - no funnies please - that I think was, in some way, reimbursed?

Use the the reserves, that croxley46 refers to. I have to use my savings for some expenditure and the council taxpayer is not a cash cow. Eventualy it will run dry!!

Rant over!!
As well as Iceland (not the one that used to be called Bejams!) I seem to recall that a lot of councils in the U.K., including TRDC (definitely) and perhaps Watford too, invested millions, foolishly, in the BCCI (Bank of Credit and Commerce International) based in the United Arab Emirates, about 10 - 15 years ago, offering high interest rates, but which went bust. Can't remember the reasons - money laundering perhaps but I do recall it was some illegal practice.
The councils were supposed to get some of their money back, but did it ever happen or was it just written off? - again, OUR money. It all went very quiet and I bet not one head rolled.
[quote][p][bold]Retlas[/bold] wrote: Rip off Britain comes to mind!! What's hapened to all the money invested by TRDC in Iceland - no funnies please - that I think was, in some way, reimbursed? Use the the reserves, that croxley46 refers to. I have to use my savings for some expenditure and the council taxpayer is not a cash cow. Eventualy it will run dry!! Rant over!![/p][/quote]As well as Iceland (not the one that used to be called Bejams!) I seem to recall that a lot of councils in the U.K., including TRDC (definitely) and perhaps Watford too, invested millions, foolishly, in the BCCI (Bank of Credit and Commerce International) based in the United Arab Emirates, about 10 - 15 years ago, offering high interest rates, but which went bust. Can't remember the reasons - money laundering perhaps but I do recall it was some illegal practice. The councils were supposed to get some of their money back, but did it ever happen or was it just written off? - again, OUR money. It all went very quiet and I bet not one head rolled. croxley46
  • Score: 3

8:15am Fri 11 Jul 14

cgpc Rob says...

Why surprised, as stated council tax payers are looked upon as a cash cow, in all levels of government!

Starting at parish councils, upwards!


Should TRDC merge with Dacorum/Hertsmere?
Why surprised, as stated council tax payers are looked upon as a cash cow, in all levels of government! Starting at parish councils, upwards! Should TRDC merge with Dacorum/Hertsmere? cgpc Rob
  • Score: -4

9:01am Fri 11 Jul 14

Phil Cox (UKIP) says...

I hope the council are not stupid enough to write a blank cheque for this "upgrade" without first examining all the options.

I would advise them to get a good consultant in to advise them. It could save them a fortune. A week of a consultants time should do it.

Out of principle I would not outsource a council IT. I have seen how big companies take advantage of customers on IT outsourcing and a council has to be more of a pushover than most.

One is assuming of course that the council would like to be prudent whilst spending our taxes. Not everything I see leads me to believe that to be true.
I hope the council are not stupid enough to write a blank cheque for this "upgrade" without first examining all the options. I would advise them to get a good consultant in to advise them. It could save them a fortune. A week of a consultants time should do it. Out of principle I would not outsource a council IT. I have seen how big companies take advantage of customers on IT outsourcing and a council has to be more of a pushover than most. One is assuming of course that the council would like to be prudent whilst spending our taxes. Not everything I see leads me to believe that to be true. Phil Cox (UKIP)
  • Score: 3

11:56am Fri 11 Jul 14

LocalBoy1 says...

This doesn't make sense to me. We have just wasted 4/5 million on a pond with bridge and now they are flapping around because the councils IT/Windows software is out of date and they have to find the money to avert a potential "disaster". ??? An odd sense of priorities!
This doesn't make sense to me. We have just wasted 4/5 million on a pond with bridge and now they are flapping around because the councils IT/Windows software is out of date and they have to find the money to avert a potential "disaster". ??? An odd sense of priorities! LocalBoy1
  • Score: 2

12:00pm Fri 11 Jul 14

TRT says...

Wondering if this is the mass Windows 2003 migration I keep reading about in the IT press... I expect there will be some hardware upgrade required as well if this is the case.
Wondering if this is the mass Windows 2003 migration I keep reading about in the IT press... I expect there will be some hardware upgrade required as well if this is the case. TRT
  • Score: 0

12:16pm Fri 11 Jul 14

Andrew Turpie says...

TRT wrote:
Wondering if this is the mass Windows 2003 migration I keep reading about in the IT press... I expect there will be some hardware upgrade required as well if this is the case.
Only a slight increase in ECC server grade RAM would be required per sever to jump to the next stage.

Windows server 2008r2 is still supported until 2016 IIRC. Microsoft do certain annual subscriptions which allow you to upgrade OSes at anytime. If you go to the right Microsoft dealer you can get a licence for around £23 per server per year.

I am assuming that they are still using physical servers, the best way to go would be to perform a "greenfield" install of the new OS across the board and then next budget, look to invest in virtualising their server estate. It has saved me £s and headaches in my job.
[quote][p][bold]TRT[/bold] wrote: Wondering if this is the mass Windows 2003 migration I keep reading about in the IT press... I expect there will be some hardware upgrade required as well if this is the case.[/p][/quote]Only a slight increase in ECC server grade RAM would be required per sever to jump to the next stage. Windows server 2008r2 is still supported until 2016 IIRC. Microsoft do certain annual subscriptions which allow you to upgrade OSes at anytime. If you go to the right Microsoft dealer you can get a licence for around £23 per server per year. I am assuming that they are still using physical servers, the best way to go would be to perform a "greenfield" install of the new OS across the board and then next budget, look to invest in virtualising their server estate. It has saved me £s and headaches in my job. Andrew Turpie
  • Score: 0

12:26pm Fri 11 Jul 14

TRT says...

Andrew Turpie wrote:
TRT wrote:
Wondering if this is the mass Windows 2003 migration I keep reading about in the IT press... I expect there will be some hardware upgrade required as well if this is the case.
Only a slight increase in ECC server grade RAM would be required per sever to jump to the next stage.

Windows server 2008r2 is still supported until 2016 IIRC. Microsoft do certain annual subscriptions which allow you to upgrade OSes at anytime. If you go to the right Microsoft dealer you can get a licence for around £23 per server per year.

I am assuming that they are still using physical servers, the best way to go would be to perform a "greenfield" install of the new OS across the board and then next budget, look to invest in virtualising their server estate. It has saved me £s and headaches in my job.
Unlimited clients?
[quote][p][bold]Andrew Turpie[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]TRT[/bold] wrote: Wondering if this is the mass Windows 2003 migration I keep reading about in the IT press... I expect there will be some hardware upgrade required as well if this is the case.[/p][/quote]Only a slight increase in ECC server grade RAM would be required per sever to jump to the next stage. Windows server 2008r2 is still supported until 2016 IIRC. Microsoft do certain annual subscriptions which allow you to upgrade OSes at anytime. If you go to the right Microsoft dealer you can get a licence for around £23 per server per year. I am assuming that they are still using physical servers, the best way to go would be to perform a "greenfield" install of the new OS across the board and then next budget, look to invest in virtualising their server estate. It has saved me £s and headaches in my job.[/p][/quote]Unlimited clients? TRT
  • Score: 0

1:13pm Fri 11 Jul 14

Andrew Turpie says...

TRT wrote:
Andrew Turpie wrote:
TRT wrote:
Wondering if this is the mass Windows 2003 migration I keep reading about in the IT press... I expect there will be some hardware upgrade required as well if this is the case.
Only a slight increase in ECC server grade RAM would be required per sever to jump to the next stage.

Windows server 2008r2 is still supported until 2016 IIRC. Microsoft do certain annual subscriptions which allow you to upgrade OSes at anytime. If you go to the right Microsoft dealer you can get a licence for around £23 per server per year.

I am assuming that they are still using physical servers, the best way to go would be to perform a "greenfield" install of the new OS across the board and then next budget, look to invest in virtualising their server estate. It has saved me £s and headaches in my job.
Unlimited clients?
Dependent on the agreement type with MS. Workstation licenses, CALs (Client Access Licences), MS Office is available on an open value license - calculated on your FTE (Full Time Employment) total. You pay per employee that works over 200 hours per annum. You can discount any staff which do completely manual tasks (say cleaners and catering staff). I have managed to get Windows down to about £8 per annum per employee and Office weighs in at around £11 each. This model makes it more affordable and is perpetual (Current windows license means I could mix and match between all flavours of Windows from Win 7 Pro right up to Win 8.1 Pro. CALS again are per employee and should cost around a couple of quid each.
[quote][p][bold]TRT[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andrew Turpie[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]TRT[/bold] wrote: Wondering if this is the mass Windows 2003 migration I keep reading about in the IT press... I expect there will be some hardware upgrade required as well if this is the case.[/p][/quote]Only a slight increase in ECC server grade RAM would be required per sever to jump to the next stage. Windows server 2008r2 is still supported until 2016 IIRC. Microsoft do certain annual subscriptions which allow you to upgrade OSes at anytime. If you go to the right Microsoft dealer you can get a licence for around £23 per server per year. I am assuming that they are still using physical servers, the best way to go would be to perform a "greenfield" install of the new OS across the board and then next budget, look to invest in virtualising their server estate. It has saved me £s and headaches in my job.[/p][/quote]Unlimited clients?[/p][/quote]Dependent on the agreement type with MS. Workstation licenses, CALs (Client Access Licences), MS Office is available on an open value license - calculated on your FTE (Full Time Employment) total. You pay per employee that works over 200 hours per annum. You can discount any staff which do completely manual tasks (say cleaners and catering staff). I have managed to get Windows down to about £8 per annum per employee and Office weighs in at around £11 each. This model makes it more affordable and is perpetual (Current windows license means I could mix and match between all flavours of Windows from Win 7 Pro right up to Win 8.1 Pro. CALS again are per employee and should cost around a couple of quid each. Andrew Turpie
  • Score: 0

2:00pm Fri 11 Jul 14

LocalBoy1 says...

Andrew Turpie wrote:
TRT wrote:
Andrew Turpie wrote:
TRT wrote:
Wondering if this is the mass Windows 2003 migration I keep reading about in the IT press... I expect there will be some hardware upgrade required as well if this is the case.
Only a slight increase in ECC server grade RAM would be required per sever to jump to the next stage.

Windows server 2008r2 is still supported until 2016 IIRC. Microsoft do certain annual subscriptions which allow you to upgrade OSes at anytime. If you go to the right Microsoft dealer you can get a licence for around £23 per server per year.

I am assuming that they are still using physical servers, the best way to go would be to perform a "greenfield" install of the new OS across the board and then next budget, look to invest in virtualising their server estate. It has saved me £s and headaches in my job.
Unlimited clients?
Dependent on the agreement type with MS. Workstation licenses, CALs (Client Access Licences), MS Office is available on an open value license - calculated on your FTE (Full Time Employment) total. You pay per employee that works over 200 hours per annum. You can discount any staff which do completely manual tasks (say cleaners and catering staff). I have managed to get Windows down to about £8 per annum per employee and Office weighs in at around £11 each. This model makes it more affordable and is perpetual (Current windows license means I could mix and match between all flavours of Windows from Win 7 Pro right up to Win 8.1 Pro. CALS again are per employee and should cost around a couple of quid each.
Do you know, just for a minute I thought we were reading an extract from "Cisco Systems Networking Professionals Magazine" NO, no, it's alright we a still on the WO, gone off topic a bit, but it's still the WO. Good grief.....
[quote][p][bold]Andrew Turpie[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]TRT[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andrew Turpie[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]TRT[/bold] wrote: Wondering if this is the mass Windows 2003 migration I keep reading about in the IT press... I expect there will be some hardware upgrade required as well if this is the case.[/p][/quote]Only a slight increase in ECC server grade RAM would be required per sever to jump to the next stage. Windows server 2008r2 is still supported until 2016 IIRC. Microsoft do certain annual subscriptions which allow you to upgrade OSes at anytime. If you go to the right Microsoft dealer you can get a licence for around £23 per server per year. I am assuming that they are still using physical servers, the best way to go would be to perform a "greenfield" install of the new OS across the board and then next budget, look to invest in virtualising their server estate. It has saved me £s and headaches in my job.[/p][/quote]Unlimited clients?[/p][/quote]Dependent on the agreement type with MS. Workstation licenses, CALs (Client Access Licences), MS Office is available on an open value license - calculated on your FTE (Full Time Employment) total. You pay per employee that works over 200 hours per annum. You can discount any staff which do completely manual tasks (say cleaners and catering staff). I have managed to get Windows down to about £8 per annum per employee and Office weighs in at around £11 each. This model makes it more affordable and is perpetual (Current windows license means I could mix and match between all flavours of Windows from Win 7 Pro right up to Win 8.1 Pro. CALS again are per employee and should cost around a couple of quid each.[/p][/quote]Do you know, just for a minute I thought we were reading an extract from "Cisco Systems Networking Professionals Magazine" NO, no, it's alright we a still on the WO, gone off topic a bit, but it's still the WO. Good grief..... LocalBoy1
  • Score: 1

2:06pm Fri 11 Jul 14

Andrew Turpie says...

LocalBoy1 wrote:
Andrew Turpie wrote:
TRT wrote:
Andrew Turpie wrote:
TRT wrote:
Wondering if this is the mass Windows 2003 migration I keep reading about in the IT press... I expect there will be some hardware upgrade required as well if this is the case.
Only a slight increase in ECC server grade RAM would be required per sever to jump to the next stage.

Windows server 2008r2 is still supported until 2016 IIRC. Microsoft do certain annual subscriptions which allow you to upgrade OSes at anytime. If you go to the right Microsoft dealer you can get a licence for around £23 per server per year.

I am assuming that they are still using physical servers, the best way to go would be to perform a "greenfield" install of the new OS across the board and then next budget, look to invest in virtualising their server estate. It has saved me £s and headaches in my job.
Unlimited clients?
Dependent on the agreement type with MS. Workstation licenses, CALs (Client Access Licences), MS Office is available on an open value license - calculated on your FTE (Full Time Employment) total. You pay per employee that works over 200 hours per annum. You can discount any staff which do completely manual tasks (say cleaners and catering staff). I have managed to get Windows down to about £8 per annum per employee and Office weighs in at around £11 each. This model makes it more affordable and is perpetual (Current windows license means I could mix and match between all flavours of Windows from Win 7 Pro right up to Win 8.1 Pro. CALS again are per employee and should cost around a couple of quid each.
Do you know, just for a minute I thought we were reading an extract from "Cisco Systems Networking Professionals Magazine" NO, no, it's alright we a still on the WO, gone off topic a bit, but it's still the WO. Good grief.....
Apologies sir, just answering a question that was asked... carry on as you were ;-)
[quote][p][bold]LocalBoy1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andrew Turpie[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]TRT[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andrew Turpie[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]TRT[/bold] wrote: Wondering if this is the mass Windows 2003 migration I keep reading about in the IT press... I expect there will be some hardware upgrade required as well if this is the case.[/p][/quote]Only a slight increase in ECC server grade RAM would be required per sever to jump to the next stage. Windows server 2008r2 is still supported until 2016 IIRC. Microsoft do certain annual subscriptions which allow you to upgrade OSes at anytime. If you go to the right Microsoft dealer you can get a licence for around £23 per server per year. I am assuming that they are still using physical servers, the best way to go would be to perform a "greenfield" install of the new OS across the board and then next budget, look to invest in virtualising their server estate. It has saved me £s and headaches in my job.[/p][/quote]Unlimited clients?[/p][/quote]Dependent on the agreement type with MS. Workstation licenses, CALs (Client Access Licences), MS Office is available on an open value license - calculated on your FTE (Full Time Employment) total. You pay per employee that works over 200 hours per annum. You can discount any staff which do completely manual tasks (say cleaners and catering staff). I have managed to get Windows down to about £8 per annum per employee and Office weighs in at around £11 each. This model makes it more affordable and is perpetual (Current windows license means I could mix and match between all flavours of Windows from Win 7 Pro right up to Win 8.1 Pro. CALS again are per employee and should cost around a couple of quid each.[/p][/quote]Do you know, just for a minute I thought we were reading an extract from "Cisco Systems Networking Professionals Magazine" NO, no, it's alright we a still on the WO, gone off topic a bit, but it's still the WO. Good grief.....[/p][/quote]Apologies sir, just answering a question that was asked... carry on as you were ;-) Andrew Turpie
  • Score: 0

3:27pm Fri 11 Jul 14

cgpc Rob says...

TRDC also lost £4.4million on William Penn,


In addition to the above Members’ Allowances, Councillors receive a payment for contributing towards the
cost of ICT for carrying out their duties. Councillors that use their own computer receive £370 per annum.
All Councillors can receive a payment of £100 for stationery.

The 2014/15 budget for Members ICT is £19,600

How much could be saved if the computer allowance was £370 over four years and if the cllr leaves prior to four years, they buy the computer at current rates
TRDC also lost £4.4million on William Penn, In addition to the above Members’ Allowances, Councillors receive a payment for contributing towards the cost of ICT for carrying out their duties. Councillors that use their own computer receive £370 per annum. All Councillors can receive a payment of £100 for stationery. The 2014/15 budget for Members ICT is £19,600 How much could be saved if the computer allowance was £370 over four years and if the cllr leaves prior to four years, they buy the computer at current rates cgpc Rob
  • Score: -1

3:49pm Fri 11 Jul 14

LocalBoy1 says...

cgpc Rob wrote:
TRDC also lost £4.4million on William Penn,


In addition to the above Members’ Allowances, Councillors receive a payment for contributing towards the
cost of ICT for carrying out their duties. Councillors that use their own computer receive £370 per annum.
All Councillors can receive a payment of £100 for stationery.

The 2014/15 budget for Members ICT is £19,600

How much could be saved if the computer allowance was £370 over four years and if the cllr leaves prior to four years, they buy the computer at current rates
??????? Pass.... ):):
[quote][p][bold]cgpc Rob[/bold] wrote: TRDC also lost £4.4million on William Penn, In addition to the above Members’ Allowances, Councillors receive a payment for contributing towards the cost of ICT for carrying out their duties. Councillors that use their own computer receive £370 per annum. All Councillors can receive a payment of £100 for stationery. The 2014/15 budget for Members ICT is £19,600 How much could be saved if the computer allowance was £370 over four years and if the cllr leaves prior to four years, they buy the computer at current rates[/p][/quote]??????? Pass.... ):): LocalBoy1
  • Score: 0

12:04am Mon 14 Jul 14

cgpc Rob says...

LocalBoy1 wrote:
cgpc Rob wrote:
TRDC also lost £4.4million on William Penn,


In addition to the above Members’ Allowances, Councillors receive a payment for contributing towards the
cost of ICT for carrying out their duties. Councillors that use their own computer receive £370 per annum.
All Councillors can receive a payment of £100 for stationery.

The 2014/15 budget for Members ICT is £19,600

How much could be saved if the computer allowance was £370 over four years and if the cllr leaves prior to four years, they buy the computer at current rates
??????? Pass.... ):):
What!
[quote][p][bold]LocalBoy1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cgpc Rob[/bold] wrote: TRDC also lost £4.4million on William Penn, In addition to the above Members’ Allowances, Councillors receive a payment for contributing towards the cost of ICT for carrying out their duties. Councillors that use their own computer receive £370 per annum. All Councillors can receive a payment of £100 for stationery. The 2014/15 budget for Members ICT is £19,600 How much could be saved if the computer allowance was £370 over four years and if the cllr leaves prior to four years, they buy the computer at current rates[/p][/quote]??????? Pass.... ):):[/p][/quote]What! cgpc Rob
  • Score: 0

11:55am Mon 14 Jul 14

LocalBoy1 says...

cgpc Rob wrote:
LocalBoy1 wrote:
cgpc Rob wrote:
TRDC also lost £4.4million on William Penn,


In addition to the above Members’ Allowances, Councillors receive a payment for contributing towards the
cost of ICT for carrying out their duties. Councillors that use their own computer receive £370 per annum.
All Councillors can receive a payment of £100 for stationery.

The 2014/15 budget for Members ICT is £19,600

How much could be saved if the computer allowance was £370 over four years and if the cllr leaves prior to four years, they buy the computer at current rates
??????? Pass.... ):):
What!
It means, I bow to your superior knowledge, it's gone over my head, so I pass!
[quote][p][bold]cgpc Rob[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LocalBoy1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cgpc Rob[/bold] wrote: TRDC also lost £4.4million on William Penn, In addition to the above Members’ Allowances, Councillors receive a payment for contributing towards the cost of ICT for carrying out their duties. Councillors that use their own computer receive £370 per annum. All Councillors can receive a payment of £100 for stationery. The 2014/15 budget for Members ICT is £19,600 How much could be saved if the computer allowance was £370 over four years and if the cllr leaves prior to four years, they buy the computer at current rates[/p][/quote]??????? Pass.... ):):[/p][/quote]What![/p][/quote]It means, I bow to your superior knowledge, it's gone over my head, so I pass! LocalBoy1
  • Score: 1

2:15pm Mon 14 Jul 14

Andrew Turpie says...

Should councils allow staff to use personal devices to work on? I would presume that they are aware of the risks of data leakage and theft of personal devices. For £370 they could purchase a council owned laptop which would be encrypted, asset marked etc - this could easy have a life span of 4 years, plus it would be surrendered upon leaving the role and handed straight to the successor. Successful fines against companies for breaches of the data protection act are pretty expensive tab to pick up (some >£50k). I'm imagining a hourglass of pound notes disappearing down the small hole.....
Should councils allow staff to use personal devices to work on? I would presume that they are aware of the risks of data leakage and theft of personal devices. For £370 they could purchase a council owned laptop which would be encrypted, asset marked etc - this could easy have a life span of 4 years, plus it would be surrendered upon leaving the role and handed straight to the successor. Successful fines against companies for breaches of the data protection act are pretty expensive tab to pick up (some >£50k). I'm imagining a hourglass of pound notes disappearing down the small hole..... Andrew Turpie
  • Score: 0
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