Defibrillator to be installed in Asda Watford

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First published in News Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author by , Senior Reporter

A public access defibrillator is to be installed in Asda Watford and store staff trained in CPR.

Asda, with partner the British Heart Foundation, is rolling out defibrillators in a bid to give its customers the best chance of survival in the case of a cardiac arrest.

The public access defibrillators in the Asda stores can be used by any member of the public to deliver an electric shock to the heart when someone is having a cardiac arrest.

Asda's Kate Naub said: "We’re really proud of our relationship with the BHF and want the people in the Hertfordshire to have the best chance of survival if cardiac arrest strikes.

"It can take a number of minutes for an ambulance to reach one of our stores in response to an emergency like a cardiac arrest.

"Asda’s investment of over half a million pounds in providing life-saving defibrillators for all of the communities we operate in could significantly cut the amount of time a cardiac arrest sufferer has to wait for life-saving CPR and defibrillation, giving them the best possible chance of survival."

Amit Aggarwal, head of Corporate Fundraising at the British Heart Foundation, added: "Cardiac arrest survival rates in the UK are astonishingly low.

But Asda’s bold commitment to become the first large retailer to have CPR trained colleagues and public access defibrillators in every store will be instrumental in helping communities up and down the country access the life-saving support they need in an emergency.

"This really could mean the difference between life and death for someone having a cardiac arrest while doing something as ordinary as shopping."

The British Heart Foundation is also working with local ambulance trusts to run familiarisation training for Asda staff on how to use the defibrillator.

Comments (9)

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6:10pm Sat 19 Jul 14

Popeonarope says...

Surely their prices aren't that bad!
Surely their prices aren't that bad! Popeonarope
  • Score: 3

8:40pm Sat 19 Jul 14

croxley46 says...

Shouldn't the trained staff be the ones to use it though, not a shopper?
Also, can it be used on someone fitted with a heart pace-maker ?
Shouldn't the trained staff be the ones to use it though, not a shopper? Also, can it be used on someone fitted with a heart pace-maker ? croxley46
  • Score: 0

10:07pm Sat 19 Jul 14

LSC says...

I may be totally wrong, and probably am if the BHF are supporting this, but my understanding is that a defibrillator stabalises an erratic heartbeat, and does little or nothing in the case of cardiac arrest.
Without a heart monitor hooked up, I'm not sure what the average person out buying spuds for dinner will be able to achieve with this equipment. Even staff trained to use it will not know when to use it or whether it has worked without a heart monitor to tell them.
Seems like a PR stunt by all involved to me, that won't actually save a single life in the real world.
CPR is great while you wait for the professionals, but then leave the clever stuff to them. Don't stick 10,000 volts through someone that it turns out has had a stroke, not a heart problem.
I may be totally wrong, and probably am if the BHF are supporting this, but my understanding is that a defibrillator stabalises an erratic heartbeat, and does little or nothing in the case of cardiac arrest. Without a heart monitor hooked up, I'm not sure what the average person out buying spuds for dinner will be able to achieve with this equipment. Even staff trained to use it will not know when to use it or whether it has worked without a heart monitor to tell them. Seems like a PR stunt by all involved to me, that won't actually save a single life in the real world. CPR is great while you wait for the professionals, but then leave the clever stuff to them. Don't stick 10,000 volts through someone that it turns out has had a stroke, not a heart problem. LSC
  • Score: 1

9:00am Sun 20 Jul 14

looneytoone says...

If this is like the machines you find in train stations and airports etc then anyone can use them, the machine does all the work and will only give a shock if they need to. All the person has to do is put the pads on the patient and turn it on. It won't shock if it senses a normal heartbeat. Very clever bit of kit. Better to have it and never need it it think.
If this is like the machines you find in train stations and airports etc then anyone can use them, the machine does all the work and will only give a shock if they need to. All the person has to do is put the pads on the patient and turn it on. It won't shock if it senses a normal heartbeat. Very clever bit of kit. Better to have it and never need it it think. looneytoone
  • Score: 7

10:56am Sun 20 Jul 14

Cuthbert007 says...

LSC wrote:
I may be totally wrong, and probably am if the BHF are supporting this, but my understanding is that a defibrillator stabalises an erratic heartbeat, and does little or nothing in the case of cardiac arrest.
Without a heart monitor hooked up, I'm not sure what the average person out buying spuds for dinner will be able to achieve with this equipment. Even staff trained to use it will not know when to use it or whether it has worked without a heart monitor to tell them.
Seems like a PR stunt by all involved to me, that won't actually save a single life in the real world.
CPR is great while you wait for the professionals, but then leave the clever stuff to them. Don't stick 10,000 volts through someone that it turns out has had a stroke, not a heart problem.
Its an AED defibrillator which means it will automatically check the person for irregular heart rythum and then prompt the user to press shock. If needed. You dont have to be a rocket scientist to use them and they do save lives. Every second counts.
[quote][p][bold]LSC[/bold] wrote: I may be totally wrong, and probably am if the BHF are supporting this, but my understanding is that a defibrillator stabalises an erratic heartbeat, and does little or nothing in the case of cardiac arrest. Without a heart monitor hooked up, I'm not sure what the average person out buying spuds for dinner will be able to achieve with this equipment. Even staff trained to use it will not know when to use it or whether it has worked without a heart monitor to tell them. Seems like a PR stunt by all involved to me, that won't actually save a single life in the real world. CPR is great while you wait for the professionals, but then leave the clever stuff to them. Don't stick 10,000 volts through someone that it turns out has had a stroke, not a heart problem.[/p][/quote]Its an AED defibrillator which means it will automatically check the person for irregular heart rythum and then prompt the user to press shock. If needed. You dont have to be a rocket scientist to use them and they do save lives. Every second counts. Cuthbert007
  • Score: 6

10:57am Sun 20 Jul 14

Cuthbert007 says...

LSC wrote:
I may be totally wrong, and probably am if the BHF are supporting this, but my understanding is that a defibrillator stabalises an erratic heartbeat, and does little or nothing in the case of cardiac arrest.
Without a heart monitor hooked up, I'm not sure what the average person out buying spuds for dinner will be able to achieve with this equipment. Even staff trained to use it will not know when to use it or whether it has worked without a heart monitor to tell them.
Seems like a PR stunt by all involved to me, that won't actually save a single life in the real world.
CPR is great while you wait for the professionals, but then leave the clever stuff to them. Don't stick 10,000 volts through someone that it turns out has had a stroke, not a heart problem.
Its an AED defibrillator which means it will automatically check the person for irregular heart rythum and then prompt the user to press shock. If needed. You dont have to be a rocket scientist to use them and they do save lives. Every second counts.
[quote][p][bold]LSC[/bold] wrote: I may be totally wrong, and probably am if the BHF are supporting this, but my understanding is that a defibrillator stabalises an erratic heartbeat, and does little or nothing in the case of cardiac arrest. Without a heart monitor hooked up, I'm not sure what the average person out buying spuds for dinner will be able to achieve with this equipment. Even staff trained to use it will not know when to use it or whether it has worked without a heart monitor to tell them. Seems like a PR stunt by all involved to me, that won't actually save a single life in the real world. CPR is great while you wait for the professionals, but then leave the clever stuff to them. Don't stick 10,000 volts through someone that it turns out has had a stroke, not a heart problem.[/p][/quote]Its an AED defibrillator which means it will automatically check the person for irregular heart rythum and then prompt the user to press shock. If needed. You dont have to be a rocket scientist to use them and they do save lives. Every second counts. Cuthbert007
  • Score: 2

1:42pm Sun 20 Jul 14

LSC says...

Fair enough, I stand corrected. It does sound a clever bit of kit, but I don't know if I'd have the courage to use it without training.
I suppose it is the cynic in me thinking that this sort of thing can justify less ambulances around and slower response times, in the same way CCTV 'justified' less coppers on the beat.
Fair enough, I stand corrected. It does sound a clever bit of kit, but I don't know if I'd have the courage to use it without training. I suppose it is the cynic in me thinking that this sort of thing can justify less ambulances around and slower response times, in the same way CCTV 'justified' less coppers on the beat. LSC
  • Score: -3

9:04am Mon 21 Jul 14

Reader (R) says...

LSC wrote:
Fair enough, I stand corrected. It does sound a clever bit of kit, but I don't know if I'd have the courage to use it without training.
I suppose it is the cynic in me thinking that this sort of thing can justify less ambulances around and slower response times, in the same way CCTV 'justified' less coppers on the beat.
Ambulance attendance time is 8 minutes on a blue light call, brain death can occur in 4 minutes from cardiac arrest. This piece of kit is the difference between life or death when waiting for an ambulance to attend.
[quote][p][bold]LSC[/bold] wrote: Fair enough, I stand corrected. It does sound a clever bit of kit, but I don't know if I'd have the courage to use it without training. I suppose it is the cynic in me thinking that this sort of thing can justify less ambulances around and slower response times, in the same way CCTV 'justified' less coppers on the beat.[/p][/quote]Ambulance attendance time is 8 minutes on a blue light call, brain death can occur in 4 minutes from cardiac arrest. This piece of kit is the difference between life or death when waiting for an ambulance to attend. Reader (R)
  • Score: 3

2:11pm Mon 21 Jul 14

LSC says...

Reader (R) wrote:
LSC wrote:
Fair enough, I stand corrected. It does sound a clever bit of kit, but I don't know if I'd have the courage to use it without training.
I suppose it is the cynic in me thinking that this sort of thing can justify less ambulances around and slower response times, in the same way CCTV 'justified' less coppers on the beat.
Ambulance attendance time is 8 minutes on a blue light call, brain death can occur in 4 minutes from cardiac arrest. This piece of kit is the difference between life or death when waiting for an ambulance to attend.
I understand that, and it is hard to see how 8 minutes can be improved on much in the real world.
But my recent ambulance experiences have not been great. A few weeks ago we waited 1 hour 10 minutes for an ambulance for someone with a severe head injury, unconscious, in shock from blood loss, history of diabetes and heart problems. A 'blues and twos' in anyone's book.

The other time I went in an ambulance with someone to Watford General. The paramedics were quick enough, but the handover at the hospital took nearly two hours, during which time the crew could not leave an attend other cases.
I'm just not confident in the system, and would prefer to see that addressed over DIY alternatives.
[quote][p][bold]Reader (R)[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LSC[/bold] wrote: Fair enough, I stand corrected. It does sound a clever bit of kit, but I don't know if I'd have the courage to use it without training. I suppose it is the cynic in me thinking that this sort of thing can justify less ambulances around and slower response times, in the same way CCTV 'justified' less coppers on the beat.[/p][/quote]Ambulance attendance time is 8 minutes on a blue light call, brain death can occur in 4 minutes from cardiac arrest. This piece of kit is the difference between life or death when waiting for an ambulance to attend.[/p][/quote]I understand that, and it is hard to see how 8 minutes can be improved on much in the real world. But my recent ambulance experiences have not been great. A few weeks ago we waited 1 hour 10 minutes for an ambulance for someone with a severe head injury, unconscious, in shock from blood loss, history of diabetes and heart problems. A 'blues and twos' in anyone's book. The other time I went in an ambulance with someone to Watford General. The paramedics were quick enough, but the handover at the hospital took nearly two hours, during which time the crew could not leave an attend other cases. I'm just not confident in the system, and would prefer to see that addressed over DIY alternatives. LSC
  • Score: -1

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