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Michael Seres

Being a patient is so much more than just taking the meds

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 5:40pm Tuesday 15th July 2014

It has been a while since my last post but that was for good reason. With so much going on I thought that I would take a step back and not post for a while. However the last few weeks as a patient have made me reflect and want to share a few thoughts with you.

Michael Seres

Who am I asks the bowel transplant patient

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 9:18am Tuesday 29th April 2014

I recently finished watching the brilliant BBC hit legal drama Silk. At the end of the series there was a vote for a new head of chambers and the two barristers started their speeches with the question “who am I”. This question has been swimming around in my head ever since. Who am I as a bowel transplant patient? Who am I as a long term patient? But in reality do those questions really matter? Should it just be; who am I, the individual?

Trusty House

Clarendon Living

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 3:54pm Tuesday 18th February 2014

Last Thursday, was a very exciting day when I attended the launch of “Clarendon Living”, our “Market Rent” brand. I had originally viewed the building before the works commenced and I could not believe my eyes with the finished project.

Champneys

Champneys the health spa and fitness motivation

Posted on 9:41am Thursday 13th February 2014

Q. I had lots of good intentions to exercise regularly in January but now I’m back on the sofa. Help!

Harjit Sarang

Surrogacy abroad

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 4:54pm Tuesday 21st January 2014

Would you opt for surrogacy abroad?

Michael Seres

A patient's wish list for 2014

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 2:49pm Tuesday 21st January 2014

This is a very personal list for me. A mixture of of my own health wishes and those that I would like to see happen in healthcare. It would be great to hear if any of your views are similar to my own. So here goes.

Harjit Sarang

Top female entrepreneur

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 9:51am Tuesday 21st January 2014

Top female entrepreneur in Hertfordshire Life magazine

Harjit Sarang

"Activism is the rent I pay to be on this planet" Alice walker

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 9:53am Friday 29th November 2013

What rent do you pay?

Michael Seres

Doctors empathise with patients - but do patients empathise with Doctors?

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 11:19am Tuesday 19th November 2013

Going back in to hospital doesn’t get easier just because you are a regular. If anything it gets even tougher because you know what is in store. I have just returned home after a ten day stretch and further surgery. As you would expect there is a blog post coming after my little journey but before that post that I wanted to write this particular article and share it with you. I take great pride in the fact that my care is very much a partnership between patient and healthcare professional. Empathy has been talked about as a key component in the partnership.  In fact I have read many articles about the best doctors are those who show empathy to their patients. After much exploration though I struggled to find articles that talk about patients who can empathise with their doctors. We can debate why this is the case for ages but for me perhaps one reason is that we often choose to take for granted the work that our HCPs do in helping us. Whilst we all want collaboration and partnership maybe that doesn’t always extend to a real understanding of what the medics go through. I think that I am just as guilty as others in this department. That was until this particular in-patient stay. The day before I went in to hospital my surgeon and I had a very open telephone call about the surgery. Nothing unusual there except I do remember thinking that he being even more cautious than normal and very specific about each individual point and potential consequence. I knew that post-transplant surgery is inevitably more complex than pre-transplant so again I sort of shrugged it off. Arriving in hospital something didn’t feel quite right. Not about my health but about the atmosphere on the ward and the way he spoke to me. Again I was told that he would do absolutely nothing to put me in jeopardy or take any risks whatsoever. I then asked a question and all the answers to the other questions in my head became obvious. Tragically an incredibly brave fellow bowel transplant patient had passed away a few days earlier. It hits all us bowel transplant patients very hard when one of the family doesn’t make it. You see, because there are so few of us we are a family. We share the successes and collectively feel the pain. That family feeling doesn’t though just apply to fellow patients. Right in front of my eyes I was seeing the pain and upset felt by the transplant team and my surgeon. Our surgeon. Nothing that anyone could have done could have prevented this tragedy. This patient was just the bravest person you could ever wish to meet. There standing in front of me was a person who not only felt his own pain but felt the pain of every single one of us and also the pain that this patient’s family were going through. He was devastated. I tried to explain that we all know the deal when we go through this surgery. We know the risks. We also know that he cannot be at our bedside 24hrs a day. I told him that he also has a family and a life and that there is no other person or surgeon that we would want in our corner than him. Those were not empty words they were the truth. I mean it, we all mean it – he is simply the best. His response was astounding. So much so that I am trying to write it down for you as close to word for word as I can. - My family understand that I need to be here for you all. I have dedicated my life to you and I want to and need to be there for you every single minute of the day. It is my responsibility to look after you and to care for you. I feel the pain you feel and when someone passes away I have to deal with my own demons and try and find a way of dealing with it for all you!

Trusty House

Our Journey Together

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 8:43am Friday 15th November 2013

I have been counting down the days to Wednesday, 6th November when I was going to be the Guest of Honour at “Our Journey Together”. This event took place at The Making of Harry Potter – Warner Bros. Studio Tour London.

Don't just talk to the patient - listen to us!

Posted on 10:51am Monday 4th November 2013

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X3jy7X_Y2dk&feature=share&list=UU_cK4xEI-uZY79uBiGjR9WQ

Trusty House

Community Chest

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 10:29am Tuesday 15th October 2013

I am very excited that the Trust has some money available to help invest in the local community with projects and community initiatives that will make such a difference!

Michael Seres

Being a bowel transplant patient doesn't mean life can't go on

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 9:34pm Tuesday 8th October 2013

I have to start this particular bowel transplant blog with a birthday hug. Who for, well me actually. Why? Well at the precise time I post this blog I was, two years, ago coming out of theatre after my transplant surgery. Who was the first person to remember? No not me but my incredible surgeon who sent me a congratulatory text. You can’t ask for better doctor-patient engagement than that can you? I have just returned from a really interesting trip to the United States. Utah and then California in fact. Utah was a brief stopover to have a meeting and then I was on to California where I had the privilege of giving the key note opening speech at Stanford Medical School’s MedicineX conference. Together with my transplant dietician Marion O’Connor we discussed how the use of digital technologies has transformed patient – doctor engagement within the bowel transplant programme.  We discussed how the use of basic technologies starting with email and text moving through to social media, blogging and finally skype clinics (yes any NHS managers reading this – Skype clinics do work and patients love them) lead to better collaboration, better engagement, better compliance and better relationships between patient and doctor but also patient to patient. More on the Stanford experience in a minute. (If you are that inpatient I will let you scroll down now) I wanted to talk about an interesting dynamic that has happened recently in my care and the impact it is still having on me as the patient. As you know I have continued to experience a plethora of symptoms ranging from basic Usain Bolt style runs to the toilet; extreme pain on the right hand side of my stomach; various joints locking at regular intervals and without warning leading to events such as the weekly ritual known as dropping the drinking glasses I am holding because the pain in the hand is so great and finally there is nightly chuck up. In fact I have got so good at the nightly vomiting that I don’t now even wake anyone up. So with those symptoms I was referred to a brilliant gastroenterologist, Dr Satish Keshev. After scopes both up and down (you get the drift), an MRE and a pill capsule test he was certain that there was potential Crohn’s activity. Now as a bowel transplant patient that really is your worst nightmare hearing those words again. However as I am on heavy immunosuppressants the choice of medications available are very limiting. Why? Well because the risk of infection is heighted being a transplant patient. So his view was resect that area as the same time as doing the other surgery. And with that news he asked me to talk to my surgeon and he would do the same. A couple of days later I speak with Anil and the words “there is no way it is Crohn’s” come loud and clear in my ear. I did manage to get the word “but” before he then went on to tell my why it couldn’t be Crohn’s and how he needed more proof. We then went on to discuss what potential surgery was needed. This bit was relatively simple. Remove the gall bladder (stones that can’t be lasered) and connect the transplanted bowel up to the top part of the stomach so that everything drains directly in to the new bowel. Pace maker I hear you cry! Well yes, it is conceivably still on the table but I have heard nothing. In true NHS administration not one single note, email, phone call (now I am being stupid) has happened so who knows. Option B was always the drainage process so that has just become option 1a.

Trusty House

Watford Foodbank and Challenge 6

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 12:56pm Thursday 12th September 2013

Life can be challenging and just living day-to-day can be very difficult for some people due to all kinds of different reasons. 

My Trip to Herts Pride

Posted on 1:35pm Friday 6th September 2013

I really enjoyed last Saturday, not only was it a really sunny day in Cassiobury Park but also the very first Herts Pride Event! Herts Pride 2013 was based around the theme of Health and WellBeing. There were lots of different agencies there and I got all sorts of health advice. There were also amazing things to buy, see and eat. It was really a day that appealed to the whole family. I met lots of people who were having a great time. There were also some fabulous acts in the Glam marquee stage and the Vibe with Pride stage had some amazing dance and music acts.

Trusty House

★ Challenge Six ★ – Putting Something Back Into The Community

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 11:23am Thursday 22nd August 2013

In celebration of our Sixth Birthday in September all of our staff have been given the opportunity to give something back to the community by carrying out six hours of voluntary work over a six month period. It’s what the Trust and our Gateway ethos is all about and together all our efforts will make such a positive difference to our local community areas and to ourselves. We are calling this Challenge Six.

Michael Seres

Bowel transplant patient morphs into patient NHS Commissioner

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 5:27pm Wednesday 21st August 2013

I thought that it was time I wrote down a summary of where my life was in bowel transplant land. In doing that I realised that my role as a patient was changing. Was that down to me or down actually to the changing nature of the NHS here in the UK? I will let you decide. A warning this is a long post  So with a backdrop of life being so much better than it was prior to my transplant this is my current daily and weekly schedule.

Trusty House

Prime Minister Visits Cycle Hub

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 9:41am Friday 16th August 2013

On Thursday, 12th August I was very privileged to meet Prime Minister David Cameron and Olympic Cyclists Sir Chris Hoy and Victoria Pendelton. They were visiting Watford Cycle Hub, which is one of our Social Enterprises, to find out how the Hub is promoting cycling in Watford.

Trusty House

New Homes

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 3:06pm Monday 12th August 2013

I was really excited to hear about the success of our bid for funding from the Homes and Communities Agency (HCA). This will support our growing programme of new homes to meet the need for affordable housing in Watford & Three Rivers.

Trusty House

Pop Up Business School

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 10:45am Friday 9th August 2013

Last Saturday and Sunday the Trust organised a Pop Up Business event at Harebreaks Community Hub. With over 30 people from Watford, Three Rivers and Hertsmere attending this was a key part of our drive to help 100 people into work by summer 2015. I can never turn down the opportunity to expand my ideas and made sure I enrolled on this course as soon as I heard about it. Am I glad I did it was truly inspiring. The weekend included exercises in confidence building, understanding your target market and selling skills. It also guided attendees on the use of social media and the internet for trading and a demonstration of how easy it is to build a website. The trainers were inspirational and good fun and the event was really engaging. So much so, that the group will be meeting again on Saturday 21st September to share their experiences and how they have got on with their 3 key actions they took from the weekend.

Trusty House

Working in Partnership

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 1:57pm Tuesday 30th July 2013

To help our tenants pay their rent by Direct Debit, one of the new incentives I am really excited about is a quarterly ‘Trusty’s Seasonal Savings’ offer. This is our first offer for new tenants signing up to Direct Debits and they, in turn will receive Home Contents Insurance for free for the first 12 months. How cool is that!! Do make sure you look out for other offers going forward after all, these are great opportunities not to be missed.

Managing your condition is not just about treatment

Posted on 5:08pm Thursday 25th July 2013

Wow, so much has happened in my bowel transplant world where to begin? Usually I like to focus on what has been happening to my health from a physical perspective. However I want to devote this post to telling you what it has been like managing basic things such as medications from a patient perspective. Sharing my own frustrating episode surrounding my obtaining my routine anti sickness mediation highlights what is wrong with the current situation in England and why being a long term patient is about so much more than just having ongoing treatment. Crohn’s Disease, bowel transplant – pah it’s got nothing on trying to get a prescription sorted.

Trusty House

Board and Gateway Leadership Team Elections

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 11:00am Friday 19th July 2013

It’s Election time again for our tenants and leaseholders. This year we have 2 vacancies on our Board and 3 on the Gateway Leadership Team (GLT). I am pleased to report that we have had some really excellent and capable candidates come forward!

Trusty House

Pop Up Business School

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 3:14pm Tuesday 16th July 2013

Although we are having beautiful weather, the economy out there is pretty tough, jobs are harder to find and unemployment is high.  Changes in welfare benefit mean that people are seeing a reduction of money coming in to their homes.  To help combat this, the Trust and the Pop Up Business School are working together to offer local people the latest tools, techniques and ways of starting a business. This is a fantastic opportunity to come along to the Watford and Three Rivers Pop Up Business Event which is taking place at Harebreaks Community Hub, Harebreaks Watford on Saturday, 3rd and Sunday, 4th August. The Business School is running a two day version to help you get going, start your own business and make money!

Harjit Sarang

Surrogacy Lawyer - Surrogacy in India

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 1:22pm Friday 12th July 2013

Surrogacy in India

Harjit Sarang

Co-parenting / donor matching

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 9:13am Wednesday 10th July 2013

Co-parenting and donor matching

Bowels, Botox and a Bowel Transplant Symposium

Posted on 8:24am Tuesday 2nd July 2013

If I am to be totally honest the last week or so since my last post has been a bit tough in my bowel transplant world. It felt a little like watching my football team QPR last season. Hoping for a run of success but sadly each match ending in defeat and subsequent supporter frustration. However unlike QPR who got relegated, my week did end on a fantastic note with a speech at the global Intestinal Transplant Symposium in Oxford.

Trusty House

Engaging with Older People

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 10:33am Thursday 20th June 2013

The variety I have in my role as Trusty is second to none. I always have a wonderful time whenever I get the chance to attend events and particularly, those that engage with older people and I am extremely privileged to have had the opportunity in the last week to attend two such events. Last Friday (14th June), I joined residents of Tree Bridge House in Garston when young and old sung their hearts out at the final afternoon of our popular music project, ‘Singing in the Schemes’.

The value of the patient

Posted on 8:24pm Monday 17th June 2013

Aside from the ups and downs of being a bowel transplant patient these last two weeks have been a welcome change from focusing on my own health challenges. Whilst phosphate levels continue to yoyo and my medical team and I grapple with bile salt levels, bacterial overgrowth, stomach dysmotility and now gastric colic reflux. All these issues in isolation would be fine but the combined effect has not been great. The fact that I was able to attend and participate at two conferences has been a welcome relief. Attending them has also been a challenge. It has led me to reflect on one point. What is the value of a patient? I ask this question, not in the context of the fact that without patient’s healthcare doesn’t exist. That would be silly. No I ask it in relation to the value that patients bring to external events around health. In truth I believe that there should be no event without patients. Patients Included is a type of Kyte mark created by Lucien Engelen. His TedX talk sums the objectives up far better than I can. Behind all of this lies the fact that actually patients bring enormous value to events. As a patient we almost feel like it is an incredible honour to be invited and that we are the token after thought. Actually if we really value the patient then we should be the first thought. Take the organisation for one thing. Most patients if they are asked to speak are still on medications, usually are not as fit and able as others and it takes far more planning for a patient to attend and speak that anyone else. Yet when we are asked we are usually expected to travel on the same schedule as a well person. Travel to and from venues on the same time frame with no thought or consideration for what we have to go through in order to be there. Now I am not on a big crusade here to travel first class everywhere, although that would be lovely. (BA/Virgin etc – yes I would love a little pampering) No what I am saying is that if you truly value the input of a patient then show that you understand. Plan and allow for patients and what they have to go through to attend. A relaxed and less stressed patient will deliver even more value.  My conference journey started by attending an event Using Social Media in Healthcare. The key note was given by Dr Mark Newbold the truly inspiring NHS Chief Executive of Heart of England. He talked about his journey in to using social media and the fact that he now posts his CEO diary on his blog. He talked about the value of social media not just as a communication function but as a way of making a difference by being truly interactive. My role was being part of a panel discussion with my #NHSSM colleague Gemma Finnegan. I talked about how to use digital technologies as part of your healthcare toolbox when managing your condition. The main thrust was my belief that using basic technology such as text, email and of course social media changes the way we interact with our healthcare professionals. To me it is obvious. Maybe that is because I am a patient. To those on the other side of the fence the word “fear” seems to engulf them and be a barrier to engagement in this way. From there I was invited to moderate a panel and be a key note speaker at Doctors 2.0 & You in Paris. I am incredibly lucky to be invited to such events. The idea of a few days in the Paris sunshine being mentally stimulated and challenged is phenomenal and the event didn’t disappoint. I had the great privilege of moderating a panel entitled Patient Designed Healthcare. The panel examined where we are today and what the future might hold. The panel consisted of what I can only describe as inspirational e-patients (Kathi Apostolidis, Liza Bernstein) and a former hospital leader now using design-thinking to inspire better staff and patient experiences, Nick Dawson.  A constant theme running through all the discussion was use of social media and how to engage and influence. We debated briefly what the term e-patient meant. I prefer to be known as an i-patient (an interactive and informed patient) but that is for another day. We finished the panel with the following question. What is the role of the patient in the future? It was answered brilliantly in one word by Gilles Frydman founder of Smart Patients – “Centre” In other words the patient will be firmly at the centre of all healthcare in the future. I guess the question that springs to my mind is why is that in the future? Why are we not there now? If you value a patient then we should be at the centre. The NHS has this saying “nothing about me without me” A bit of a tick box at the moment if you ask me. My key note presentation took a somewhat different form. Twelve Imodium, antibiotics and two anti-sickness injections later and I was ready to leave my hotel for the session. I had the honour of presenting with one of the world’s leading intestinal transplant and intestinal failure dieticians Marion O’Connor. The fact that Marion treats me is an added bonus. We talked about stripping back all the talk of apps and new technology and used our talk as a conversation between patient and healthcare professional about how we actually interact on a daily basis. What it is really like on the coal face, in the outpatient clinics, on the wards and with day to day interaction. I’m lucky, our relationship and the one I have with Anil Vaidya, and my surgeon is unique. The real question is why is it unique? Why are we all not interacting like this? It would be easy to put all the blame at the door of the doctor. Believe me I still feel that they shoulder much of it through their fear of change. However if a patient is truly interactive and a patient enters their relationship with their doctor in a collaborative way then instantly the dynamic has changed.

Trusty House

Watford Mencap Children’s Centre

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 9:22am Thursday 23rd May 2013

I recently visited the newly refurbished soft play area at Watford Mencap Children’s Centre. We awarded £3,574 from our Better Communities Fund to refurbish a soft play area at the Children’s Centre in St Albans Road which is used by children with learning disabilities.

Michael Seres

Sometimes it's ok to just be a patient

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 6:42pm Wednesday 22nd May 2013

The British Medical Journal just came out with a heading that should have all patient’s jumping for joy - Let the patient revolution begin. As one of those patients who talks tirelessly about how important the role of the patient is in healthcare I was definitely one of those smiling when I heard about the article. But then I started to think a little bit more about things. A thought that hadn’t entered my head for a very long time suddenly found itself front and centre. What if a patient just wants to be a patient? Actually what if a patient just needs to be a patient? Is that still ok? In my own bowel transplant journey this week I felt like a patient who needed some help as opposed to an e-patient or the term I always prefer to be described as an i-patient (meaning interactive in all aspects of my health care). I actually felt that it was ok to be passive and turn to my medical team for help and support as opposed to constantly wanting to be part of every decision as well as striving to help find the answers.  Having started treatment for the bile mal-absorption I then underwent a CT scan to see if I had developed a hernia at the site of my stoma and where I previously had one. The results came back pretty quick to rule out a returning hernia so that was positive. From CT I then spent the day back at the John Radcliffe Hospital doing a great impression of a blocked drain that was having Dynarod drain cleaners shoved in from both ends to check for blockages. Fortunately I wasn’t awake for most of the day. Sedation in my view is not a luxury but a necessity and fortunately there was no resistance put up by the doctor. Once sedated my day comprised of a colonoscopy and endoscopy with a balloon dilation and biopsies taken for good measure. The purpose of all of this was blockage at the join of where my new transplant bowel is joined to my own bowel. This area is known as the ileo-colonic section. I am still waiting for a formal result from this day’s events but it did leave me not only feeling a little rough and sore but also a tad vulnerable again. I suddenly felt that I needed someone (in my case my surgeon) to take complete charge and help sort things out. That is what he is doing and within 24hrs I had started to receive text messages saying that he was looking in to everything. I am back in Oxford twice next week so should have some answers by then. What this week has brought home is that no matter how interactive or how positive you are, as a patient there are times when you really do simply need to be a patient. I am experiencing some ongoing issues with joint pains – bizarrely my hands, feet and back seem to lock the moment I stretch them out in any way. The suspicion is that my bone density levels are poor and possible effects of the tacromilus anti-rejection medications but we will get to the bottom of it over the coming week or two. No matter what type of patient I am my faith and trust in my medical team has never wavered. The question that I am still grappling with is whether there really is a patient revolution going on? Has technology and especially social media simply made patients more engaged and empowered? Has that has created a completely different dynamic in how healthcare gets delivered? This may well be true as is the undoubted fact that health self-management is gaining enormous traction especially with patients who have long term conditions. In that area I will just tease you a little with a new self-management hub that will launch soon. Watch out for crowdhealth – no website yet but there will be soon and it looks cracking. I’m all in favour of patient power. This slideshare really gives you an insight in to what it is all about. I do believe that patients need to take more active role in how they manage their health but sometimes there is no substitute for just wanting your doctor to look after you. Till next time x

Trusty House

Twitter

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 9:30am Thursday 16th May 2013

Are you a social media fanatic???? I never thought in a million years I would spend my day “tweeting”. You really have to keep up with web-based technologies and what better way to inform everyone of my hectic life than tweeting so I have set myself up with a “Twitter” Account.

Trusty House

Launch of Jobs At Home

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 9:45am Thursday 2nd May 2013

One of the reasons I so enjoy being me is that I lead such an exciting and diverse life. An example of this is last Thursday, 25th April I had the privilege to be standing on the Terrace of the House of Commons to attend the launch of “Jobs at Home”. I mean how often do you get a chance to attend an event such as that?

Trusty House

Watford Foodbank

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 2:06pm Friday 26th April 2013

Time has gone by so quickly since I attended the opening of the Watford Foodbank last year with the demand for their services increasing all the time. 

Jamie McDougall

There's Only One Lloyd Doyley

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 12:29pm Friday 19th April 2013

‘One-club’ players are a rarity in the world of football these days but for Watford’s very own Lloyd Doyley, this isn’t the case.

Trusty House

Social Enterprise – The Watford Cycle Hub

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 4:28pm Thursday 18th April 2013

Last week I talked about the Green Canteen and all those lovely vegetables I could use.  This week carrying on with the health living theme I thought I’d tell you about another really exciting Social Enterprise we’ve helped to develop - the Watford Cycle Hub.

Harjit Sarang

Co-parenting – artificial insemination at home

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 2:03pm Wednesday 17th April 2013

getting co-parenting right

Trusty House

Social Enterprise – The Green Canteen

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 8:23am Friday 12th April 2013

How green are your fingers?? I love gardening and find it very therapeutic – there is something about being out in the fresh air, cultivating plants and watching them grow to maturity. Although with the extreme weather conditions we have been experiencing this year, it has been far more challenging but we are really excited at how the Green Canteen has developed since its inception in August last year.

Harjit Sarang

Step Parent Rights

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 11:22am Friday 22nd March 2013

“When is the right time to introduce my new Partner to the children?”

Michael Seres

A bowel transplant MOT

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 7:18pm Friday 15th March 2013

My journey has a bowel transplant patient has taken me off in a number of directions over the last couple of weeks. Some have been great some not so good but again all paths lad back to The Churchill Hospital in Oxford and the transplant unit and my surrogate family. The route to this particular visit has been interesting though and as I sit in room 11 having just ordered a take away pizza (sorry no free advertising of any pizza chains on this blog that is unless free pizzas are on offer) for some hot food at a decent time I thought that I would tell you about the latest instalment of being a patient, bowel transplant style.

Harjit Sarang

Tony and Barrie Drewitt Barlow - surrogacy

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 10:22am Monday 11th March 2013

Harjit Sarang meets Tony and Barrie Drewitt Barlow to talk surrogacy, gender selection and TOWIE!

Michael Seres

Bowel transplant to the BBC News & Sky News Channels - believe the unbelievable

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 3:12pm Monday 25th February 2013

I have tried hard this week to get my head out of bowel transplant mode and in to the space reserved for “rest of my life.” I just figured that with my head still spinning with so many things it was time for a mental clear out, a kind of spring clean of the mind. As I write this I have visions of a mini me with duster and polish sitting inside my head polishing lots of bits until they are all shiny. Just hope mini me doesn’t drop anything, that is if there is anything to actually drop.

Trusty House

Welfare Reform - Will This Affect You?

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 11:15am Friday 22nd February 2013

There are lots of changes taking place to the Welfare Benefits system this April and I’m sure that many people must be worried about how it affects them.  So I thought I’d discuss these changes with our Financial Inclusion Officer so I could help anyone who asked me about them.

Trusty House

Are You Just One Payday Cheque Away From A Crisis?

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 12:15pm Thursday 14th February 2013

With the precarious nature of today’s economy and many jobs being lost nationally with businesses going into administration, if that happened and you found yourself with no pay cheque next month, how would you cope?  How would you pay your bills and buy food for the family?  These are the questions, our residents are facing day in, day out, with many facing a pay freeze, the threat of redundancy hanging over them and some facing problems just getting basic benefits.

Harjit Sarang

Fertility Law / Parenting Law

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 10:02am Wednesday 13th February 2013

Lesbian and gay couples have been creating families for some time now. It's about time the law played catch up!

Michael Seres

What do Space Mountain & bowel transplant have in common?

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 4:24pm Sunday 10th February 2013

This last week seems to have typified my journey through bowel transplant. When I was told that having a bowel transplant was swapping one set of problems for another I knew what I was being told but never really appreciated what that actually meant. I went in to the surgery knowing the risks and complications but at that time I hadn’t eaten for 3 years and had intestinal failureso for me there was no choice.

Jamie McDougall

Are you sure Mr Holloway?

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 8:12pm Saturday 9th February 2013

After Crystal Palace’s 2 goal comeback against Watford on Friday night, Ian Holloway slated the way the hornets loan so many players from Udinese.

Jamie McDougall

Mayor Dorothy Thornhill to tackle alcohol related crime in Watford

Watford Observer: Photograph of the Author

Posted on 3:08pm Wednesday 6th February 2013

Alcohol related arrests in Watford Town Centre have increased by almost a third in the past year, but Mayor Dorothy Thornhill plans to halt the rise.

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